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krossbow
2010-07-20, 10:46 PM
Intent:
The intent of this is to both improve the monk up to tier 3-2 levels, as well as allow individuals to create a monk that "feels" like what they believe a monk should be. The design of this is so that you could have a mystically styled on, a purely physical one or a speed designed one. Thoughts and feedback would be greatly appreciated.


Monk


Game Rule Information

Alignment: Lawful
Hit Die: 1d8.
Starting Gold: 200

Class Skills: The monkís class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (Dex), Climb (Str), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Escape Artist (Dex), Hide (Dex), Jump (Str), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Perform (Cha), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Spot (Wis), Swim (Str), and Tumble (Dex).
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: (4+Int or wis Mod)

Requirements: Monks practice a system of belief that stresses the reincarnation and divinity in all things; as such, their views contrast sharply with the deities of faerun, and are branded by the deities as being the faithless. A cleric, paladin or other religious class loses all spellcasting and supernatural abilities if they become a monk, and a monk who becomes a cleric or other divine class loses their chi and monk class features.


Weapon Proficiencies: Monks are proficient with club, crossbow (light or heavy), dagger, handaxe, javelin, kama, nunchaku, quarterstaff, sai, shuriken, siangham, and sling.

Monks are proficient with light armor.


Monk
{table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|unarmed strike damage|
Bonus Chi|Fast movement|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Class abilities

1st|
+0|
1d6|
0|+5|
+2|
+2|
+2|Unarmored defense, Wisdom & knowledge, Unarmed strike proficiency, Chi, School training

2nd|
+1|
1d8|
0|+5|
+3|
+3|
+3|Greater unarmored defense

3rd|
+2|
1d8|
0|+10|
+3|
+3|
+3|School training

4th|
+3|
1d8|
1|+10|
+4|
+4|
+4|

5th|
+3|
1d8|
1|+15|
+4|
+4|
+4|school training

6th|
+4|
2d6|
1|+15|
+5|
+5|
+5|

7th|
+5|
2d6|
1|+20|
+5|
+5|
+5|school training

8th|
+6|
2d6|
2|+20|
+6|
+6|
+6|

9th|
+6|
2d6|
2|+25|
+6|
+6|
+6|school training

10th|
+7|
2d8|
2|+25|
+7|
+7|
+7| Focused chi

11th|
+8|
2d8|
2|+30|
+7|
+7|
+7|school training

12th|
+9|
2d8|
3|+30|
+8|
+8|
+8|

13th|
+9|
2d8|
3|+35|
+8|
+8|
+8|school training

14th|
+10|
3d6|
3|+35|
+9|
+9|
+9|

15th|
+11|
3d6|
3|+40|
+9|
+9|
+9|school training

16th|
+12|
3d6|
4|+40|
+10|
+10|
+10|

17th|
+12|
3d6|
4|+45|
+10|
+10|
+10|school training

18th|
+13|
3d8|
4|+45|
+11|
+11|
+11|

19th|
+14|
3d8|
4|+50|
+11|
+11|
+11|school training

20th|
+15|
3d8|
5|+50|
+12|
+12|
+12|school training[/table]

Class abilities:

Chi: Monks learn to center themselves, allowing themselves to draw upon inner reserves of strength. This energy is partially physical, but also spiritual; the energy of chi is identical to the energy that the gods gain from worship and prayer, only in this case harnessed by the monk himself rather than another being.

A monk may tap into their chi as a free action, sacrificing one point to add 1d4 as a bonus to a single d20 roll of their choice (only 1 point of chi can be tapped per d20 roll unless otherwise stated), or as a dodge bonus to their AC for one round. Additionally, certain monk abilities use chi.
A good way to keep track of chi is to keep a cup with quarters next to you; keep a quarter out for every point of chi you have, and toss it in the cup when you tap it.

A monk begins with a pool of maximum chi equal to their wisdom modifier, and gains bonus chi points as they level up.

A monk may attempt to center himself in combat as a full round action with a concentration check; the DC for this is the CR of the situation he is in +15. Success refills 1/2 of his maximum chi; failure refills one chi. A monk may never have more than their maximum chi. A monk in a non-threatening situation may take 20 to center themselves; if not in combat or another dangerous situation, generally assume a monk is at full chi due to this.

Focused Chi: A monk may tap two points of chi as a bonus to d20 rolls rather than just one.

Fast Movement: As a Monk gains in experience, they learn to move quicker than most people; the amount of speed the monk has to their base movement is indicated in this table.

Unarmored defense: Monks are exceptionally practiced at fighting without armor on; when a monk is unarmored and unencumbered, he gains a +2 dodge bonus to his AC. This is not to say that monks shun armor completely; many monks choose to wear light armor.
However, many masters or more agile monks often go without.

Greater Unarmored defense: A monk also gains a +1 dodge bonus to his AC equal to 1/2 his monk level when fighting without armor.

Wisdom and Knowledge: Monks often eschew traditional learning in favor of contemplation and understanding. As such, a monk may substitute their wisdom modifier in place of their intelligence modifier for skill points every time they gain a level in monk.

Unarmed strike: [ex] A monk is exceptionally well trained in unarmed fighting; as they gain in experience, their unarmed strikes deal more damage.

Schools: Monks base their fighting styles off of the four elements for inspiration; Fire for martial combat and discipline, Wind for speed and grace, earth for sturdiness and solidarity, and water for quite contemplation and spiritual clarity. Each school has techniques that a monk may choose to learn as they gain experience.
A monk may learn any apprentice techniques whenever they wish; a monk must learn 3 apprentice techniques from a school before being able to learn a intermediate technique, and must know 3 intermediate technique of a school before tackling a master's technique.

A monk learns a new technique every time it is stated next to a level. A monk may not learn the same technique twice; certain techniques however have improved versions of themselves.

Earth Techniques (apprentice)

Iron Body [ex]: The monk gains 1d4 bonus hit points, plus a bonus point of HP per monk level

Deny injury [su]: A monk may, as an immediate action, sacrifice chi to subtract 1d4 points of damage from a damaging attack; the amount of chi he may tap for this is unlimited, as long as he has the chi to do so.

Deny Elements [ex]: The monk gains 1 point of resistance against all elements as well as 1 more point of resistance for every 2 monk levels he has.

Stability of the earth [ex]: the monk gains a +2 bonus to Grapple, bullrush and trip attempts and rolls when he is on the ground or another sturdy surface.

Impasse [ex]: At the cost of making himself more vulnerable, a monk blocks opponents as implaceably as stone. As a free action, a monk may declare that he is doing this. The monk suffers a -4 penalty to his AC, but any opponent that he threatens who attempts any movement (Including 5 foot steps and charging past him) provokes an attack of opportunity from the monk, and must succeed on an opposed bull rush against the monk. Failing indicates that the monk's strength and blows have blocked the opponent, effectively cutting off their movement.

Brutal Grappling [ex]: Anytime you beat an opponent's grapple check by 5 or more, and are on the ground or adjacent to a wall or obstacle, you gain a free attack of opportunity with your unarmed strike, as you batter your foe against the surroundings or floor.

CQC speciality [ex]: Anytime you strike an opponent with your unarmed strike, you may make a special grapple check with a -5 penalty. Success indicates that your onslaught impairs your opponent, preventing them from moving due your proximity being nigh on top of them. (An opponent may still perform other actions not requiring movement as normal).
To simplify, for one round after failing to beat your grapple check, they are unable to move.

Strong in body, strong in mind [su]: The monk gains bonus Chi equal to 1/2 their con modifier.

Karma [su]: The monk's focus has made him a conduit for the forces of balance in the universe. Whenever a foe inflicts 10 points of damage to the monk (including damage negated by Deny injury) he gains a point of karma. Karma functions in all ways identical to chi except that it can only be used offensively against a monk's foes, not defensively (I.E., it cannot be used to boost saves or abilities such as deny injury).
A monk who breaks off a conflict with such individuals loses their points of karma as the forces of balance seek other avatars for their efforts.

Lesser Stoneskin [ex]: You gain damage reduction of DR 1/- which increases by 1 for every 2 monk levels you possess.


Earth School (apprentice skills):

Diamond Body [ex]: The Monk gains +1d8 hp plus one point of HP per monk level.

Greater Deny injury [su]: When denying injury, the amount negated is 1d8 per chi sacrificed.

Greater Deny Elements [ex]: This ability supersedes and replaces deny elements. The monk gains 1 point of resistance to all elements per monk level.

(Greater) Strong in body, strong in mind [su]: This ability supersedes and replaces strong in mind, strong in body. The monk gains bonus chi equal to 1.0 their constitution modifier.

Center of gravity [ex]: You may add your constitution modifier as a bonus to grapple, trip and bullrush checks.

Crushing Grasp [ex]: When grappling a foe, you may add your constitution modifier as a damage bonus to unarmed strikes against that foe.

Greater Stoneskin [ex]: This ability supersedes and replaces lesser stoneskin. You gain one point of damage reduction of DR/- for every monk level you possess.

Indomitable [ex]: Whenever the monk is reduced to less than half of his maximum hit points he gains fast healing equal to his constitution modifier until he is at or above 50% of his maximum Hit points.


Earth School (Masters):

Master's deny injury [su]: When a monk taps a point of chi to deny damage, he denies 1d12 points of damage per chi sacrificed.

Adamantine Body [ex]: the monk gains 1d12 bonus HP, plus one point of hp per monk level

Mettle [ex]: any ability that requires a fortitude or will save and has a lesser effect on a successful save instead has no effect upon a successful will or fortitude save.

Master's strong in body, strong in mind [ex]: This ability supersedes and replaces greater strong in body, strong in mind. The Monk gains bonus Chi equal to 1.5 times their constitution modifier.

Landslide [ex]: When grappling a foe, you may bullrush them without breaking your grapple (though this still requires a standard action). Bullrushing them into a wall or other object allows for a free attack of opportunity with a an unarmed strike.

Wind School (apprentice)

lesser Form over function [ex]: The monk gains a permanent +1 dodge bonus to their AC, but suffers a permanent -1 penalty to their hit and damage.

Lesser Sudden Strike [ex]: The monk deal an addition 1d6 points of sudden strike damage to any flatfooted foe they attack; this increases by 1d6 for every 8 monk levels they possess.

Windows of opportunity [ex]: Any attacks of opportunity that the monk makes treats the foe as if they were flatfooted.

Deny Gravity [ex]: the monk may act as though under the effects of spider climb during their turn so long as they end on level terrain (As an example, a monk could move along a wall for 20 feet, but would fall if they ended their movement there).

Flurry of blows [ex]: The monk may make an additional attack during the round at the penalty of a -2 to hit and damage per attack they make; they may not make more additional attacks than their dexterity modifier. This does not require you to full attack to do so, and may be done while spring attacking.

Misdirection [ex]: Anytime a foe attacks and misses the monk, they may sacrifice a point of chi and make a reflex save against that previous missed attack; if the reflex save is higher than the missed attack, it is directed towards another foe adjacent to the monk as it passes; this new target is considered flatfooted against this attack.

Fast as the wind [ex]: The monk's base movement speed is increased by an additional 5 per every 2 monk levels.

Slow fall [ex]: monk within armís reach of a wall can use it to slow his descent. The amount the monk can slow himself by is equal to 1/2 his normal movement speed.

Zephyr [ex]: The monk gains a +2 bonus to hit and damage whenever moving move than 10 feet in a round.

Acrobatics training [ex]: The monk may substitute their dexterity for their strength when making jump, swim or climb checks.

Wind School (intermediate):

Evasion [ex]: The anytime the monk successfully reflex saves against an attack that has a lesser effect on a successful save, he instead suffers no damage.

Uncanny dodge [ex]: the monk can react to danger before her senses would normally allow her to do so. She retains her Dexterity bonus to AC (if any) even if she is caught flat-footed or struck by an invisible attacker. However, she still loses her Dexterity bonus to AC if immobilized.

Improved Flurry of blows [ex]: This ability supersedes and replaces flurry of blows (flurry of blows is required to learn this skill). The penalty for each successive blow is reduced to -1 to hit and -1 to damage to all attacks for every bonus attack made.

Sudden strike [ex]: This ability supersedes and replaces lesser sudden strike (lesser sudden strike is required to learn this skill). Whenever the monk attacks a flatfooted opponent, they deal 1d6 points of precision damage plus an 1d6 for every 6 monk levels they possess.

Whipsnap [ex]: Anytime the monk attacks an opponent, the opponent must perform a reflex save (10 +1/2 monk level + monk's dexterity modifier). Failure indicates that the monk is literally too fast for the opponent to properly defend against, and is treated as flat footed.

Greater form over function [ex]: The monk gains a +1 dodge bonus to their AC, reflex saves and initiative, but suffers a permanent -1 penalty to hit and damage.

Compensate for size [ex]: the monk gains a +1 bonus to hit, damage, AC and reflex saves for every size category their attacker is larger than them.

Eternal speed [SP]: the monk may act as though under the effects of a haste spell for 1d4 rounds by sacrificing a point of chi as an immediate action.

Wind School (Masters):

Improved evasion [ex]: This ability requires evasion to learn. a monkís evasion ability improves. She still takes no damage on a successful Reflex saving throw against attacks, but henceforth she takes only half damage on a failed save. A helpless monk does not gain the benefit of improved evasion.

Improved Uncanny dodge [ex]: The monk can no longer be flanked; in order to sneak attack the monk, the opponent must be 4 levels higher in rogue or monk than them to do so.

Eternal freedom [SP]: By sacrificing a point of chi as an immediate action, a monk may gain the effects of freedom of movement for 1d4 rounds.

Striking the wind [ex]: Anytime an opponent attacks the monk, they must make a reflex save (10+ 1/2 monk level + monk's dexterity modifier). Failure indicates that the monk's speed is too great for the opponent to accurately keep up with, and the monk's ac is treated as if their dexterity modifier were double.

Time stands still [Su]: By sacrificing a point of chi as a free action, the monk may speed themselves up as if everyone else around them were frozen; the monk gains a bonus move action.

Improved Sudden strike [ex]: This ability supersedes and replaces sudden strike (sudden strike is required to learn this skill). Whenever the monk attacks a flatfooted opponent, they deal 1d6 points of precision damage plus an 1d6 for every 4 monk levels they possess.


Fire (apprentice):

The greatest defense [ex]: The monk gains a permanent +1 bonus to hit and damage, but incurs a permanent -1 penalty to AC.

Reckless intent [ex]: the Monk may, as a free action, decrease their AC in order to increase their ability to attack foes. For every -1 penalty to AC they take (up to a maximum of -5), they gain a +1 bonus to hit and damage.

Bloodthirst [ex]: Some monks lose themselves into darker urgers, focusing on carnage over tranquility and meditation. Such monks gain 1 point of chi whenever they kill a foe or successfully land a critical blow.

Improved Crit [ex]: The monk's unarmed strike's natural critical range increases to 19-20.

Break the unbreakable [ex]: Blows of the monks of the fire school are often so forceful as to shatter things thought untouchable; the monk may critical opponents immune to precision type damage, but suffer a -5 penalty to confirm the critical blow.
Golems suffer fractures in keyspot and oozes splatter and tremble from the overwhelming force of the monk.

Focused strikes [ex]: whenever the monk sacrifices a point of chi as a bonus to their attack roll, they also gain that as a bonus to their damage (this is also multiplied if its a critical blow).

Martial training [ex]: The monk deals damage with any non-unarmed strike weapon as if it were one size category larger than it is.

Powerful blows [ex]: When power attacking with unarmed strike, the monk may treat their unarmed strike as if it were a large 2 handed weapon (+2 bonus to damage for every -1 penalty to hit).

Unbalancing strike [ex]: As a full round action or as part of a charge, a monk may perform a single, powerful blow designed to break their target's guard. If the unarmed strike connects, the opponent must make a fortitude save (10 +1/2 monk level +monk's strength modifier) or be fatigued for 1d4 rounds.
If the monk power attacks when doing this, the DC of this ability is increased by 1 for every -2 penalty to hit.

Parry [ex]: the monk may sacrifice a point of chi to attempt to deflect an opponent's attack. The monk performs an attack roll against their opponents; if the monk's attack roll is higher than their foes, the attack is deflected away. If the monk beats their opponent by 5 or more they may immediately make an attack of opportunity against their opponent, treating them as flatfooted.

Fire School (intermediate):

Improved crit [ex]: The monk's unarmed critical strike modifier is increased to x3

The greatest defense [ex]: The monk's base attack bonus is increased to +1 per monk level (the same as a fighter), but the monk suffers a permanent -1 penalty to AC.

Crippling strike [ex]: If the monk attempts an unbalancing strike on a fatigued foe, their attacks aim for pressure points and vital regions. Any fatigued foe who fails their fortitude save against unbalancing strike also suffers 1d4 con damage. Any foe with regeneration or fast healing has their healing halved until this constitution damage is healed.

Bloodknight [ex]: the monk's lust for battle is overwhelming; such monk's seek out strong opponents constantly, thirsting for a worthy opponent. they gain one point of chi each round if the battle is 3 CR's over their character level or the DM judges their to be a 50% chance for the monk or their party to die.

Overwhelming strength [ex]: The monk may add 1/2 their monk level as a bonus to strength checks.

Deny Armor [ex]: The monk may ignore 1/2 of an opponents damage reduction when performing unarmed strikes.

Stunning blow [ex]: As a full round action, or as part of a charge, the monk may make a single, powerful attack against their opponent. If this unarmed strike connects, the foe must make a fortitude save (DC 10 +1/2 monk level +monk's strength modifier) or be stunned for 1d4 rounds.

Shatter the ethereal [SP]: The monk's spirit and martial prowess is strong enough as to combat magic itself. by sacrificing a point of chi, the monk, as a full round action, or as part of a charge, may make a single unarmed strike; anything struck by this also functions as if greater dispel magic had been cast upon it, using the monk's level instead of caster level. This even shatters force cages as if the monk's fist were a disintegration spell.

Adamantine fists [ex]: the monk's fists are forevermore treated as being adamantine in nature.

Fire School (master):

Improved crit [ex]: the monk's unarmed strike's natural crit range is increased to 18-20

Strength of the giants [ex]: The Monk functions as if he were one size category larger. The monk's unarmed strike damage increases accordingly, he gains a +4 bonus to grapple attempts and all other relevant abilities.

Killing Blow [ex]: Any foe who fails their save against being fatigued by unbalancing strike by 5 or more is instead slain, as the monk deadens nerves and severs arteries.

Greater Martial training [ex]: This ability replaces and supersedes martial training (the monk must know martial training to learn this ability). The monk deals damage with all non-unarmed strike weapons as if he were one size category larger, plus another size category for every 10 monk levels he possesses.

Greater deny armor [ex]: By sacrificing one point of chi as an immediate action, the monk may completely ignore an opponent's damage reduction with his attack, so focused is his will.

Juggernaut [su]: The monk's drive to battle is overwhelming, allowing him to ignore things that would debilitate normal individuals. By sacrificing a point of chi as free action, the monk may ignore any strength or dexterity damage he has suffered for 1d4 rounds.

krossbow
2010-07-20, 10:53 PM
Water school (apprentice):

Tounge of the wise: A monk can use intuition and carefully reasoned arguments in place of flair or other abilities to sway an argument. The monk may freely substitute wisdom for charisma for all bluff, diplomacy, intimidate and charisma checks.

Calm as the stream: A monk may add their wisdom modifier as a bonus to concentration checks (including concentration checks to center themselves).

Empowered fists: A monk's chi flows through them, and enhances all parts of them. The monk gains a +1 magic enhancement to his fists, plus an additional +1 enhancement per 4 monk levels he possesses (These additional enhancements can be things such as flaming or keen if he chooses; however, it requires 24 full hours of meditation to alter how this enhancement manifests itself).

Enforce will: A monk's meditation and study in the divinity of all things allows him to enforce his very will upon reality, cowing creation into obeying him. Once per hour, as a full round action, a monk can produce a single magical effect that replicates any level 1 or level 0 spell of his choosing. When doing this, the monk must sacrifice an amount of chi equal to the spell level (as an example, a level 1 spell would cost 1 chi, a level 0 spell would cost 0). A level 10 or higher monk can produce level 2 spells. Use the monk's wisdom modifier for the save DC.

As this is a product of the monk's intent and not sorcery, the monk must not "know" the spell; it can be divine or arcane. However, should the spell require experience to cast, subtract this as normal. Should it require material components that cost more than 100g, treat the spell as if it were one level higher than normal, and tax the monk 1/10 the GP cost as experience drain.

The monk is fatigued for 1d4 rounds after doing this from the strain.

Resonance: Actions in the universe cause ripples, ripples which the monk has devoted his life to studying. Any opponent which the monk has struck with his fists suffers a -1d4 penalty to saves against the monk's supernatural abilities for one minute, and the monk gains a +1d4 bonus to hit any foe he's assailed with his supernatural abilities for one minute.

Chi lance: By sacrificing a point of chi, the monk can focus their will into a potent weapon. As a full round action, the monk may attack with a ranged touch attack with a range of 90 feet.
This attack deals 1d6 points of damage per monk level; foes hit by this ability may make a fortitude save (10 +1/2 monk level + monk's wisdom modifier) to halve this.
This attack can be "charged" as a full round action, increasing the monk's level for this ability by 1 per round (the monk's level can never be more than double his normal monk level). Additionally, the monk can sacrifice bonus chi when attempting this, increasing the ability's save DC by one per chi point.

When dealing with inanimate objects or slain opponents, the chi lance has a similiar effect to the spell disintegration.

the monk is fatigued for 1d4 rounds after performing this action.

Still mind: The monk gains an inherent +2 bonus against all spells and supernatural effects, and a +4 bonus against psionics.

Wholeness of body: a monk can heal the wounded when required. As a standard action, a monk can heal 1d6 points of HP per monk level.

Purity of body: The monk gains immunity to all diseases except for supernatural and magical. diseases.

Greater Chi: when sacrificing chi, the monk gains a 1d6 bonus to d20 rolls.

Water (intermediate):

Tounge of the moon & Sun: The monk gains the ability to speak with any living creature.

See the unseen: The monk's mediation and study has allowed them to glimpse things in the universe as they truly are; attempts to interfere or shroud objects are as nothing to a monk. If any invisible or magically concealed individuals come within sight of the monk, he is entitled to a will save against these effects, even if the ability normally does not a will save. If the ability is not a spell but naturally produced, treat the DC of this save as (10 +1/2 the individual's HD + their charisma modifier).

Timeless body: a monk no longer takes penalties to her ability scores for aging and cannot be magically aged. Any such penalties that she has already taken, however, remain in place. Bonuses still accrue, and the monk still dies of old age when her time is up.

Empty body: a monk gains the ability to assume an ethereal state for 1 round per monk level per day, as though using the spell etherealness. She may go ethereal on a number of different occasions during any single day, as long as the total number of rounds spent in an ethereal state does not exceed her monk level.

Greater Chi Lance: As a full round action, the monk may perform a magical ranged touch attack with a range of 90 feet.
This ability deals 1d8 points of damage per monk level when used; individuals struck by this ability are entitled to a fortitude save (10 +1/2 monk level + monk's wisdom modifier) to halve this.
This attack can be "charged" as a full round action, increasing the monk's level for this ability by 3 per round (the monk's level can never be more than double his normal monk level). Additionally, the monk can sacrifice bonus chi when attempting this, increasing the ability's save DC by one per chi point.

This ability produces a shockwave when it impacts on an individual surface, equal in size to 1 foot per dice of damage (so 10d6 would be a 10 foot radius). Any individual in this area must make a reflex save (10 +1/2 monk level + monk's wisdom modifier) or suffer half damage. A successful save indicates 0 damage.

When dealing with inanimate objects or slain opponents, the chi lance has a similiar effect to the spell disintegration.

The monk is fatigued for 1d4 rounds after using this ability.

Greater enforce will: The monk's ability to command reality increases. Once per hour, as a full round action he may replicate the effect of any level 3 spell of his choosing. A monk of level 10 may replicate level 4 spells, and one of level 15 or higher may replicate level 5 spells. This ability drains chi equal to the level of the spell replicated.

As this is a product of the monk's intent and not sorcery, the monk must not "know" the spell; it can be divine or arcane. However, should the spell require experience to cast, subtract this as normal. Should it require material components that cost more than 100g, treat the spell as if it were one level higher than normal, and tax the monk 1/10 the GP cost as experience drain.

The monk is fatigued for 1d4 rounds after doing this from the strain.

Greater empowered fists: This ability replaces and supersedes empowered fists (you must first know empowered fists to learn this ability). The monk's fists gain a +1 magical enhancement per 2 monk levels he possesses. A monk of level 20 or higher is treated as having epic quality unarmed strikes for the purposes of damage reduction.

Deny magic: As an immediate action, by sacrificing a point of chi, the monk may attempt to counterspell any magic used against him. perform a caster power check using the monk's level against the spell being cast against him.

Water (Masters):


Perfect self: The monk becomes a magical creature. She is forevermore treated as an outsider rather than as a humanoid (or whatever the monkís creature type was) for the purpose of spells and magical effects. Additionally, the monk gains damage reduction 10/magic, which allows her to ignore the first 10 points of damage from any attack made by a nonmagical weapon or by any natural attack made by a creature that doesnít have similar damage reduction. Unlike other outsiders, the monk can still be brought back from the dead as if she were a member of her previous creature type.

Third Eye: The monk functions as if under the effects of a permanent trueseeingg spell.

Master's Enforce will: Once per day, as a full round action, at the cost of 7 chi, the monk may replicate the effects of a limited wish spell. Experience cost and other details remain the same.
A monk of level 15 or higher can instead perform a wish spell at the cost of 9 chi.

The monk is fatigued for 1d4 rounds after performing this action.

Master's Chi Lance: By sacrificing a point of chi, s a full round action, the monk may perform a magical ranged touch attack with a range of 90 feet.
This ability deals 2d6 points of damage per monk level when used; individuals struck by this ability are entitled to a fortitude save (10 +1/2 monk level + monk's wisdom modifier) to halve this.
This attack can be "charged" as a full round action, increasing the monk's level for this ability by 5 per round (the monk's level can never be more than double his normal monk level). Additionally, the monk can sacrifice bonus chi when attempting this, increasing the ability's save DC by one per chi point.

This ability produces a shockwave when it impacts on an individual surface, equal in size to 1 foot per dice of damage (so 20d6 would be a 20 foot radius). Any individual in this area must make a reflex save (10 +1/2 monk level + monk's wisdom modifier) or suffer half damage. A successful save indicates 0 damage.

When dealing with inanimate objects or slain opponents, the chi lance has a similiar effect to the spell disintegration.

The monk is fatigued for 1d4 rounds after using this ability.

The monk must know greater chi lance to learn this ability.

Chi well: The monk's mind is in a constant state of meditation; the monk regains one point of chi every round, no matter what.

Tranquil mind: the monk functions as if under the permanent effects of a mind blank spell.


Master of the four paths:

A monk who knows 1 ability from all four schools gains a permanent +1 bonus to all his base statistics (Str, Dex, Con, Wis, Int, Char) and may immediately choose one free ability from a school of his choosing.

A monk who knows 2 abilities from all four schools gains a permanent +1 bonus to all his base statistics (Str, Dex, Con, Wis, Int, Char) and may immediately choose one free ability from a school of his choosing.

A monk who knows 3 abilities from all four schools gains a permanent 2 bonus to all his base statistics (Str, Dex, Con, Wis, Int, Char) and may immediately choose one free ability from a school of his choosing.

peacenlove
2010-07-21, 02:41 AM
Been slowly reading this (haven't yet read maneuvers) and found out the following problems:
First of all fluff wise this differs a lot from the base monk to the point that it needs another name altogether. Monks in PHB have no problems with gods. Also i see this class is faerun specific so it would be good to have an adaptation section for other setting and how they fit in the belief system of those campaigns.

Their Hit Die should be d8 not 1d8

Also any iterative attacks from a higher attack bonus must be stated.

How does chi replenish out of combat? (since i haven't read about maneuvers i can't comment about the usefulness of this). Also what kind of action is to spend one (or later 2) point of chi?

All abilities (including your maneuvers, just state that they are all extraordinary in nature, and mark any supernatural ones as the exceptions) must have a tag next to them, whether they are extraordinary (EX), supernatural (SU) or spell like (SP) in nature.

I assume greater unarmored defense works only without armor however you must clarify that.

You have a mistake on the table: Wisdom and information should be renamed into wisdom and knowledge.

Can i select the same maneuver more than once?

I will read the maneuvers section later, all in all it is an interesting take on improving the monk.

EDIT: Meh Random Person is faster and said it better than me anyways :smallwink:

Fortuna
2010-07-21, 03:23 AM
Intent:
The intent of this is to both improve the monk up to tier 3-2 levels, as well as allow individuals to create a monk that "feels" like what they believe a monk should be. The design of this is so that you could have a mystically styled on, a purely physical one or a speed designed one. Thoughts and feedback would be greatly appreciated.

A noble project, and a common one. Let's see what you bring to the table.



Monk


Game Rule Information

Alignment: Lawful
Hit Die: 1d8.
Starting Gold: 200

Give a roll, not a number, for starting gold (unless that's intentional, which would be strange).


Class Skills: The monkís class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (Dex), Climb (Str), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Escape Artist (Dex), Hide (Dex), Jump (Str), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Perform (Cha), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Spot (Wis), Swim (Str), and Tumble (Dex).
Skill Points at Each Additional Level: (4+Int or wis Mod)

Woo! Skills!
A decent sized list. Peeking ahead at the class features to understand the skill points thing: I'd suggest that you leave that as a class feature and not mention it here. That's a decent amount of skill points, probably at least 6 every level. A monk can now afford to get a decent handle on one or two areas of skills. Add in the skill points at first level line.


Requirements: Monks practice a system of belief that stresses the reincarnation and divinity in all things; as such, their views contrast sharply with the deities of faerun, and are branded by the deities as being the faithless. A cleric, paladin or other religious class loses all spellcasting and supernatural abilities if they become a monk, and a monk who becomes a cleric or other divine class loses their chi and monk class features.

I don't see the point. It's an amusing bit of fluff, but I cannot see the point of it other than to give the finger to anyone who wants to try monk/cleric or whatever. I'd remove it, adding it as a note at the end at most.


Weapon Proficiencies: Monks are proficient with club, crossbow (light or heavy), dagger, handaxe, javelin, kama, nunchaku, quarterstaff, sai, shuriken, siangham, and sling.

Monks are proficient with light armor.

But not their own fists? :smalltongue: Seriously, just give them all simple weapons. It's simpler. Change the heading to "Weapon and Armor Proficiencies".



<table snipped>

No BAB boost, so that to-hit had better come from elsewhere. A new type of ability, too, and significant fast movement (I like the division into smaller steps). Add the iterative attacks in the BAB column


Chi: Monks learn to center themselves, allowing themselves to draw upon inner reserves of strength. This energy is partially physical, but also spiritual; the energy of chi is identical to the energy that the gods gain from worship and prayer, only in this case harnessed by the monk himself rather than another being.

A monk may tap into their chi, sacrificing one point to add 1d4 as a bonus to a single d20 roll of their choice, or as a dodge bonus to their AC. Additionally, certain monk abilities use chi.
A good way to keep track of chi is to keep a cup with quarters next to you; keep a quarter out for every point of chi you have, and toss it in the cup when you tap it.

A monk begins with a pool of maximum chi equal to their wisdom modifier, and gains bonus chi points as they level up.

A monk may attempt to center himself in combat as a full round action with a concentration check; the DC for this is the CR of the situation he is in +15. Success refills 1/2 of his maximum chi; failure refills one chi. A monk may never have more than their maximum chi.

Focused Chi: A monk may tap two points of chi as a bonus to d20 rolls rather than just one.

Our first new ability. Unfortunately, it's not stellar. The full-round action recovery hurts, and in my opinion you should lower it to a standard action and drop the DC by five or ten, or drop it to a move action. You may mean EL, not CR, and that system is stuffed up anyhow. In all honesty, leave it at a flat DC 15, or DC 20 as a move action (or even both options).

Even the points you have aren't great. +1d4 to a d20 roll or AC, up to Wis mod+5 (at the highest levels) times before refreshing? That actually really hurts. On the other hand, looking ahead indicates that you get new uses later, so I'll give you the benefit of the doubt. Specify that Focused Chi doubles the bonus (I would personally treble it instead, if you don't take my refresh advice). Also, make clear that it comes in at tenth level.


Fast Movement: As a Monk gains in experience, they learn to move quicker than most people; the amount of speed the monk has to their base movement is indicated in this table.

OK, fine, whatever.


Unarmored defense: Monks are exceptionally practiced at fighting without armor on; when a monk is unarmored and unencumbered, he gains a +2 dodge bonus to his AC. This is not to say that monks shun armor completely; many monks choose to wear light armor.
However, many masters or more agile monks often go without.

Greater Unarmored defense: A monk also gains a +1 dodge bonus to his AC equal to 1/2 his monk level.[quote]

Combine these into one ability. No Wis mod? Ah well, this is so-so at best. AC is weak at higher levels, and this is not the most impressive of abilities.

[quote]Wisdom and Knowledge: Monks often eschew traditional learning in favor of contemplation and understanding. As such, a monk may substitute their wisdom modifier in place of their intelligence modifier for skill points every time they gain a level in monk.

More skill points for free is always good, thumbs up. Similar abilities for other classes have been an idea that I was considering for a while.


Unarmed strike: A monk is exceptionally well trained in unarmed fighting; as they gain in experience, their unarmed strikes deal more damage.

What, no Improved Unarmed Strike?


Schools: Monks base their fighting styles off of the four elements for inspiration; Fire for martial combat and discipline, Wind for speed and grace, earth for sturdiness and solidarity, and water for quite contemplation and spiritual clarity. Each school has techniques that a monk may choose to learn as they gain experience.
A monk may learn any apprentice techniques whenever they wish; a monk must learn 3 apprentice techniques from a school before being able to learn a intermediate technique, and must know 3 intermediate technique of a school before tackling a master's technique.

A monk learns a new technique every time it is stated next to a level.

And here we have what must be the meat of the class, because the rest of it isn't.


Earth Techniques (apprentice)

Iron Body: The monk gains 1d4 bonus hit points, plus a bonus point of HP per monk level

Deny injury: A monk may, as an immediate action, sacrifice chi to subtract 1d4 points of damage from a damaging attack; the amount of chi he may tap for this is unlimited, as long as he has the chi to do so.

Deny Elements: The monk gains 1 point of resistance against all elements as well as 1 more point of resistance for every 2 monk levels he has.

Stability of the earth: the monk gains a +2 bonus to Grapple, bullrush and trip attempts and rolls when he is on the ground or another sturdy surface.

Impasse: At the cost of making himself more vulnerable, a monk blocks opponents as implaceably as stone. As a free action, a monk may declare that he is doing this. The monk suffers a -4 penalty to his AC, but any opponent that he threatens who attempts any movement (Including 5 foot steps and charging past him) provokes an attack of opportunity from the monk, and must succeed on an opposed bull rush against the monk. Failing indicates that the monk's strength and blows have blocked the opponent, effectively cutting off their movement.

Brutal Grappling: Anytime you beat an opponent's grapple check by 5 or more, and are on the ground or adjacent to a wall or obstacle, you gain a free attack of opportunity with your unarmed strike, as you batter your foe against the surroundings or floor.

CQC speciality: Anytime you strike an opponent with your unarmed strike, you may make a special grapple check with a -5 penalty. Success indicates that your onslaught impairs your opponent, preventing them from moving due your proximity being nigh on top of them. (An opponent may still perform other actions not requiring movement as normal).

Strong in body, strong in mind: The monk gains bonus Chi equal to 1/2 their con modifier.

Karma: The monk's focus has made him a conduit for the forces of balance in the universe. Whenever a foe inflicts 10 points of damage to the monk (including damage negated by Deny injury) he gains a point of karma. Karma functions in all ways identical to chi except that it can only be used offensively against a monk's foes, not defensively (I.E., it cannot be used to boost saves or abilities such as deny injury).
A monk who breaks off a conflict with such individuals loses their points of karma as the forces of balance seek other avatars for their efforts.

Lesser Stoneskin: You gain damage reduction of DR 1/- which increases by 1 for every 2 monk levels you possess.

Iron Body: Marginally, and I mean marginally, better than a fairly weak feat. I'd never take it.
Deny Injury: It spends an immediate action, and yet I only negate 1d4+level damage? That'll barely stop a kobold at level 1. Weak.
Deny Elements: 1+level/2 resistance to all elements. Subpar, since at low levels it does nothing and at high levels it's too small to make much difference.
Stability of the Earth: +2 to a few checks. If you want to focus on one of these, then it's the best so far.
Impasse: Combat Reflexes + This + Spiked Chain = best monk dip EVAR!
Brutal Grappling: If you're grapple-focused, this is very nice. If you can obtain Improved Grab (see Polymorph, among others) this is stupid.
CQC Specialty: Combine with Brutal Grappling. Pump your grapple check. Rule.
Strong in Body, Strong in Mind: While anyone has decent Con, I don't foresee anyone not building around it getting more than 1 point out of this at the most. Specify minimum 1.
Karma: So if I take hits to my fragile hide, I get a tiny amount of chi? Not worth it, since it requires you to be taking damage to work, and you should be avoiding that.
Lesser Stoneskin: This ability is better than Deny Injury in almost every imaginable way. No action usage, no chi expenditure, and comparable (i.e. negligable) effect at high levels. I'd choose this over Deny Injury every time.
Summary: Widely fluctuating power levels. Alternating between useless and useless until broken, the best balanced one is probably Impulse. I'm not taken with these.


Earth School (apprentice skills):

Diamond Body: The Monk gains +1d8 hp plus one point of HP per monk level.

Greater Deny injury: When denying injury, the amount negated is 1d8 per chi sacrificed.

Greater Deny Elements: This ability supersedes and replaces deny elements. The monk gains 1 point of resistance to all elements per monk level.

Greater Strong in body, strong in mind: This ability supersedes and replaces strong in mind, strong in body. The monk gains bonus chi equal to 1.0 their constitution modifier.

Center of gravity: You may add your constitution modifier as a bonus to grapple checks.

Crushing Grasp: When grappling a foe, you may add your constitution modifier as a damage bonus to unarmed strikes against that foe.

Greater Stoneskin: This ability supersedes and replaces lesser stoneskin. You gain one point of damage reduction of DR/- for every monk level you possess.

Indomitable: Whenever the monk is reduced to less than half of his maximum hit points he gains fast healing equal to his constitution modifier until he is at or above 50% of his maximum Hit points.

Do you mean Intermediate? You need a consistent header style throughout these abilities.
Diamond Body: Same issue as its predecessor.
Greater Deny Injury: See my comments for Deny Injury. Also, now Deny Injury is even less tempting because I could wait for this even if I wanted it. this kind of damage denial needs to scale more than linearly.
Greater Deny Elements: You may want to use that text in others of these techniques. Also, same problem as Deny Elements: just not worth it at any level.
Greater Strong in Mind, Strong in Body: So now, at best, I could see 3 points of chi. Not impressing me. Specify minimum 1.
Center of Gravity: More grapple-focus. If you want to focus on grapple, there's a technique to learn at every level up to seven now. Not very impressive, though. Specify minimum 1.
Crushing Grasp: More damage. Yay. Specify minimum 1.
Greater Stoneskin: If lesser stoneskin was this, it might be worth taking. Not so much now.
Indomitable: Out-of-combat healing is always nice, I guess. Limited, though.
Summary: You get these at level seven, earliest. If you're aiming for tier three, then these are competing with level four maneuvers, and they just don't cut it. Apart from a couple of abilities, these are just bigger numbers.


Earth School (Masters):

Master's deny injury: When a monk taps a point of chi to deny damage, he denies 1d12 points of damage per chi sacrificed.

Adamantine Body: the monk gains 1d12 bonus HP, plus one point of hp per monk level

Mettle: any ability that requires a fortitude or will save and has a lesser effect on a successful save instead has no effect upon a successful will or fortitude save.

Master's strong in body, strong in mind: This ability supersedes and replaces greater strong in body, strong in mind. The Monk gains bonus Chi equal to 1.5 times their constitution modifier.

Landslide: When grappling a foe, you may bullrush them without breaking your grapple (though this still requires a standard action). Bullrushing them into a wall or other object allows for a free attack of opportunity with a an unarmed strike.

Master's Deny Injury: See predecessors.
Adamantine Body: See predecessors.
Mettle: At level 13? So-so, made better by your good saves. Best of the Earth abilities so far.
Master's Strong in Body, Strong in Mind: See predecessors.
Landslide: You can move one foe around. As a standard action. *clap clap clap*.
Summary: Too many bigger numbers, and not even big enough numbers. Entirely outclassed by maneuvers (remember, you're competing with level 7 maneuvers now).


Wind School (apprentice)

lesser Form over function: The monk gains a permanent +1 dodge bonus to their AC, but suffers a permanent -1 penalty to their hit and damage.

Lesser Sudden Strike: The monk deal an addition 1d6 points of sudden strike damage to any flatfooted foe they attack; this increases by 1d6 for every 8 monk levels they possess.

Windows of opportunity: Any attacks of opportunity that the monk makes treats the foe as if they were flatfooted.

Deny Gravity: the monk may act as though under the effects of spider climb during their turn so long as they end on level terrain (As an example, a monk could move along a wall for 20 feet, but would fall if they ended their movement there).

Flurry of blows: The monk may make an additional attack during the round at the penalty of a -2 to hit and damage per attack they make; they may not make more additional attacks than their dexterity modifier. This does not require you to full attack to do so, and may be done while spring attacking.

Misdirection: Anytime a foe attacks and misses the monk, they may sacrifice a point of chi and make a reflex save against that previous missed attack; if the reflex save is higher than the missed attack, it is directed towards another foe adjacent to the monk as it passes; this new target is considered flatfooted against this attack.

Fast as the wind: The monk's base movement speed is increased by an additional 5 per every 2 monk levels.

Slow fall: monk within armís reach of a wall can use it to slow his descent. The amount the monk can slow himself by is equal to 1/2 his normal movement speed.

Zephyr: The monk gains a +2 bonus to hit and damage whenever moving move than 10 feet in a round.

Acrobatics training: The monk may substitute their dexterity for their strength when making jump, swim or climb checks.

Lesser Form Over Function: Weaker Combat Expertise. Lame.
Lesser Sudden Strike: A tiny amount of extra damage (maxing at 3d6). Blech.
Windows of Opportunity: Nice, and acceptably powerful. Shadow Hand beats it at higher levels, but when you get it it's OK.
Deny Gravity: Some movement. Great. But this is situational at best.
Flurry of Blows: You what? Seriously, what? Buh? This right here is worth a monk dip for any Dex-focused character, or indeed any character with Dex modifier of 2 or more. Specify minimum 1.
Misdirection: I like it.
Fast as the Wind: Yeah, you're fast, we get it, but this is just not needed.
Slow Fall: Wait, what does this even do? You still take full falling damage.
Zephyr: OK, so now I get a +2 on my attacks and damage rolls if I move? Combines nicely with Flurry of Blows.
Acrobatics Training: Yech. If that's what floats your boat, your boat aint floating.
Summary: More gems than Earth, but power levels still vary. Flurry of Blows gets stupid fast.


Wind School (intermediate):

Evasion: The anytime the monk successfully reflex saves against an attack that has a lesser effect on a successful save, he instead suffers no damage.

Uncanny dodge: the monk can react to danger before her senses would normally allow her to do so. She retains her Dexterity bonus to AC (if any) even if she is caught flat-footed or struck by an invisible attacker. However, she still loses her Dexterity bonus to AC if immobilized.

Improved Flurry of blows: This ability supersedes and replaces flurry of blows (flurry of blows is required to learn this skill). The penalty for each successive blow is reduced to -1 to hit and -1 to damage to all attacks for every bonus attack made.

Sudden strike: This ability supersedes and replaces lesser sudden strike (lesser sudden strike is required to learn this skill). Whenever the monk attacks a flatfooted opponent, they deal 1d6 points of precision damage plus an 1d6 for every 6 monk levels they possess.

Whipsnap: Anytime the monk attacks an opponent, the opponent must perform a reflex save (10 +1/2 monk level + monk's dexterity modifier). Failure indicates that the monk is literally too fast for the opponent to properly defend against, and is treated as flat footed.

Greater form over function: The monk gains a +1 dodge bonus to their AC, reflex saves and initiative, but suffers a permanent -1 penalty to hit and damage.

Compensate for size: the monk gains a +1 bonus to hit, damage, AC and reflex saves for every size category their attacker is larger than them.

Eternal speed: the monk may act as though under the effects of a haste spell for 1d4 rounds by sacrificing a point of chi as an immediate action.
Evasion: OK.
Uncanny Dodge: OK
Improved Flurry of Blows: Hard to break it more, but I'd argue that this achieves it.
Sudden Strike: Not worth taking in place of Lesser Sudden Strike. Not that Lesser Sudden Strike was worth taking in the first place.
Whipsnap: Now there's a reason to take Lesser Sudden Strike.
Greater Form Over Function: Not worth mentioning.
Compensate for Size: Say opponent, not attacker. Depending on the campaign, this ranges from awesome to worthless. Situational at any rate.
Eternal Speed: Not very eternal, but an extremely impressive use for chi. I would never burn chi on anything else.
Summary: Better than Earth again. Still, there are clearly good and clearly bad abilities, and I don't think it's tier 3.


Wind School (Masters):

Improved evasion: This ability requires evasion to learn. a monkís evasion ability improves. She still takes no damage on a successful Reflex saving throw against attacks, but henceforth she takes only half damage on a failed save. A helpless monk does not gain the benefit of improved evasion.

Improved Uncanny dodge: The monk can no longer be flanked; in order to sneak attack the monk, the opponent must be 4 levels higher in rogue or monk than them to do so.

Eternal freedom: By sacrificing a point of chi as an immediate action, a monk may gain the effects of freedom of movement for 1d4 rounds.

Striking the wind: Anytime an opponent attacks the monk, they must make a reflex save (10+ 1/2 monk level + monk's dexterity modifier). Failure indicates that the monk's speed is too great for the opponent to accurately keep up with, and the monk's ac is treated as if their dexterity modifier were double.

Time stands still: By sacrificing a point of chi as a free action, the monk may speed themselves up as if everyone else around them were frozen; the monk gains a bonus move action.

Improved Sudden strike: This ability supersedes and replaces sudden strike (sudden strike is required to learn this skill). Whenever the monk attacks a flatfooted opponent, they deal 1d6 points of precision damage plus an 1d6 for every 4 monk levels they possess.

Improved Evasion: Fine.
Improved Uncanny Dodge: Fine.
Eternal Freedom: Weak, but not stunningly so.
Striking the Wind: A little weak, since AC is becoming obsolete at this point.
Time Stands Still: Look at Diamond Mind and weep.
Improved Sudden Strike: Possibly worth taking.
Summary: Similar problems to Earth at this level.

I am too tired to go through the other two, but think about my comments. Remember, the tier system is also about options: I haven't even mentioned them yet, but your abilities have trouble keeping up with one option of a similarly-leveled martial adept.