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Grytorm
2010-09-16, 06:31 PM
It appears that gamers have a reputation for quoting the show during games. At least two web comics I have read have referenced this. How prevalent is this?

AtopTheMountain
2010-09-16, 06:32 PM
Extremely.

Esser-Z
2010-09-16, 06:33 PM
Quite. Monty Python is a nerd favorite. D&D is a nerd favorite.


Do the math.

Urpriest
2010-09-16, 06:33 PM
How prevalent is it? Well, does it weigh the same as a duck? That should answer your question.

dgnslyr
2010-09-16, 06:33 PM
It appears that gamers have a reputation for quoting the show during games. At least two web comics I have read have referenced this. How prevalent is this?

The paradox of any game set in an Arthurian setting is that it is impossible for players to not quote Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and it is impossible to maintain an atmosphere once they do.

Shade Kerrin
2010-09-16, 06:34 PM
Well, since I had a Gm who needed to annul an entire session after MP quotes started to be thrown around, common enough

ArcanistSupreme
2010-09-16, 06:47 PM
The group I play in has a gentlemen's agreement to use Monty Python quotes sparingly.

Dienekes
2010-09-16, 06:47 PM
It is not a true D&D game at my table unless there has been at least 1 Monty Python joke (we tend to use the tv show more than the movie though).
The scene switches? "And now for something completely different."
Are the nobles squabbling? "The winner of the upper class twit of the year is ____! What an amazing twit!"
A surprising plot point is brought up? "NOBODY EXPECTS THE SPANISH INQUISITION!"
Killed a hiding opponent? "He failed his lesson on how not to be seen."
Heck we've even had a conversation involving the possible qualities of an undead parrot all IC.

The truly odd thing is, I actually run a serious campaign...

The-Mage-King
2010-09-16, 06:49 PM
NO one expects the Flayin' Inquisition!

Quite prevalent.

Kurald Galain
2010-09-16, 06:56 PM
http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=673

http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=906

kyoryu
2010-09-16, 07:01 PM
Approximately as prevalent as pizza. Maybe even more so.

Christopher K.
2010-09-16, 07:14 PM
I actually implemented the rule, "Anyone who quotes Holy Grail during a session should be made to eat their own character sheet" to much success. And I actually got a player to eat a character sheet because of it.

arrowhen
2010-09-16, 07:42 PM
Back in the wild days of my reckless youth I learned an interesting fact: Monty Python and the Holy Grail + adult beverages + "you quote, you drink" = group cured of quoting habit. (And a very short night!)

MeatShield#236
2010-09-16, 07:46 PM
Very prevelent. My wizard once fireballed the Knights who Say Nee after they asked him to get a shrubery.

Esser-Z
2010-09-16, 07:53 PM
I actually implemented the rule, "Anyone who quotes Holy Grail during a session should be made to eat their own character sheet" to much success. And I actually got a player to eat a character sheet because of it.

What if they instead quote one of the more obscure sketches?

onthetown
2010-09-16, 08:09 PM
Back in the wild days of my reckless youth I learned an interesting fact: Monty Python and the Holy Grail + adult beverages + "you quote, you drink" = group cured of quoting habit. (And a very short night!)

That would make me want to quote MP.

grarrrg
2010-09-16, 08:34 PM
What if they instead quote one of the more obscure sketches?

I got it!
The 'first' time a movie scene/show sketch is quoted is 'free'.
Anytime someone duplicates the same scene/sketch, they get a 'penalty' (see also: drinking game).
Everytime the same scene/sketch is quoted the penalty is upped.

It'll allow small amounts and the occassional 'whoopsie', but will discourage overdoing it, and encourge diversity.

Katana_Geldar
2010-09-16, 08:40 PM
We used to have a rule in our group that if you quoted Monty Python, you got hit with a LARP dagger. Not sure what happened to that rule.

Though one of the guys in the group has NEVER seen Monty Python. :smalleek:

Tyndmyr
2010-09-16, 08:42 PM
It is not a true D&D game at my table unless there has been at least 1 Monty Python joke (we tend to use the tv show more than the movie though).
The scene switches? "And now for something completely different."
Are the nobles squabbling? "The winner of the upper class twit of the year is ____! What an amazing twit!"
A surprising plot point is brought up? "NOBODY EXPECTS THE SPANISH INQUISITION!"
Killed a hiding opponent? "He failed his lesson on how not to be seen."
Heck we've even had a conversation involving the possible qualities of an undead parrot all IC.

The truly odd thing is, I actually run a serious campaign...

Also, coconuts, and any combatant that has lost multiple limbs. Or hell, any black knight.

And if they see a rabbit or a wizard named Tim, it's all over. Unfortunately, one of my players is actually named Tim.

Thurbane
2010-09-16, 09:46 PM
It happened so much it eventually got banned at our games.

They new favorite is "That's what she said!" in response to any statement that has even the slightest double entendre to it.

Tyndmyr
2010-09-16, 09:53 PM
Yeah...that one gets outta control too. Used at even the slightest hint that it might somehow be applicable.

Roll init!

That's what she said!

Shut up.

Mando Knight
2010-09-16, 09:54 PM
There are some who call me Tim, though, honestly!

...But they're generally mistaking me for my little brother.

Lhurgyof
2010-09-16, 10:17 PM
Monty Python hate? Blasphemy! :smalleek:

Admiral Squish
2010-09-16, 10:34 PM
My dad owns the full monty python collection, so whenever me and my brother encounter a friend who DOESN'T know Monty Python, we have a tradition of kidnapping them to the basement and making them watch Holy grail, Life of Brian, Meaning of Life, and one or more seasons of Flying Circus, depending on how badly they struggle at this point.

The_Admiral
2010-09-16, 10:37 PM
My dad owns the full monty python collection, so whenever me and my brother encounter a friend who DOESN'T know Monty Python, we have a tradition of kidnapping them to the basement and making them watch Holy grail, Life of Brian, Meaning of Life, and one or more seasons of Flying Circus, depending on how badly they struggle at this point.
Do they laugh?

Admiral Squish
2010-09-16, 10:47 PM
Do they laugh?

The ones who know what's good for 'em, at least..

No, most of them love us for it. A couple don't get it (Surprisingly high percentage of females). Our stepmom said it seemed like it would be something the would be entertaining if she was really high at the time, but not otherwise.

Kallisti
2010-09-16, 10:51 PM
It appears that gamers have a reputation for quoting the show during games. At least two web comics I have read have referenced this. How prevalent is this?

In our Changeling game, we elected the captain of the Summer Guard "Upper-class twit of the year." In character.

In other words, it's nigh-ubiquitous.

Esser-Z
2010-09-17, 08:29 AM
I got it!
The 'first' time a movie scene/show sketch is quoted is 'free'.
Anytime someone duplicates the same scene/sketch, they get a 'penalty' (see also: drinking game).
Everytime the same scene/sketch is quoted the penalty is upped.

It'll allow small amounts and the occassional 'whoopsie', but will discourage overdoing it, and encourge diversity.

That sounds reasonable! Furthermore, players should (as in a certain XKCD strip) be encouraged to exercise their OWN absurdist humor, as that would better honor the legacy of the Pythons.

Greenish
2010-09-17, 08:36 AM
Approximately as prevalent as pizza. Maybe even more so.Or spam. Or pizza and spam, spam, pizza and spam, spam, spam, pizza, spam and spam.

It would make a great drinking game, though the night would probably then end in TPK because people kept using d4 for attack rolls.

Shenanigans
2010-09-17, 08:51 AM
There's some Monty Python quoted in my groups, but as one tends to play a lot of SW:Saga Edition, the various Star Wars films are quoted more often, as one would expect. To be honest, though, I think that's part of the charm of playing it...almost every session someone "has a bad feeling about this." :)

My other main group tends more towards Futurama (Bender's "wooooo"), Firefly ("the chain of command"), The Hunt for Red October ("you arrogan a$$, you've killed us!"), and Dead Alewives (all).

Amphetryon
2010-09-17, 08:57 AM
The other one that always got quoted in my games? Ghostbusters.

Someone comes running back to the group, chased by [insert monster]?

"Ray? What did you do, Ray?"

Immediate response to seeing a monster is 'CHARGE!'?
"Get her? That was your plan?" and/or "I like this plan. I'm excited about it. I'm happy to be a part of it."

...and so forth.

Greenish
2010-09-17, 08:58 AM
My other main group tends more towards Futurama (Bender's "wooooo"), Firefly ("the chain of command"), The Hunt for Red October ("you arrogan a$$, you've killed us!"), and Dead Alewives (all)."Do you know what the chain of command is!? It's the chain I will go get and beat you up with until you remember I'm in command!" :smallbiggrin:

Ormagoden
2010-09-17, 08:59 AM
One, Two, Five!
Three sir.
Three!

<BLAM>

Dienekes
2010-09-17, 09:48 AM
There's some Monty Python quoted in my groups, but as one tends to play a lot of SW:Saga Edition, the various Star Wars films are quoted more often, as one would expect. To be honest, though, I think that's part of the charm of playing it...almost every session someone "has a bad feeling about this." :)

My other main group tends more towards Futurama (Bender's "wooooo"), Firefly ("the chain of command"), The Hunt for Red October ("you arrogan a$$, you've killed us!"), and Dead Alewives (all).

If you play any SW game bad feelings MUST be everywhere. Or some variation of it. It just wouldn't feel right if they don't appear.

Futurama is also often quoted around my table, though we tend to favor Dr. Farnsworth "Oh yes..." and Zoidberg "Woobwoobwoobwoobwoob!"

Not so much for Firefly and Red October though. The really odd one that is gaining prevalence has been Dr. McNinja. Though this may mostly be because one of the characters in my SW campaign's background is that he was once a doctor before going adventuring.

Shenanigans
2010-09-17, 09:49 AM
The other one that always got quoted in my games? Ghostbusters.

Someone comes running back to the group, chased by [insert monster]?

"Ray? What did you do, Ray?"

Immediate response to seeing a monster is 'CHARGE!'?
"Get her? That was your plan?" and/or "I like this plan. I'm excited about it. I'm happy to be a part of it."

...and so forth.
Ghostbusters (and the sequel) are popular with us also.

"No human would stack books like this."

Radar
2010-09-17, 10:01 AM
Ghostbusters (and the sequel) are popular with us also.

"No human would stack books like this."
My favorite was: "Back off man, i'm a scientist." :smallbiggrin:

"Princess Bride" might be a great source of quotes, yet most people in my group wouldn't even notice intrusions from it. :smallannoyed:

Gerrtt
2010-09-17, 10:17 AM
I played in a game with a wizard named Tim once, but it was short for Tymothi and he spelled it "Tym."

Furthermore, he didn't break character with MP quotes, ever. He was far to busy looking up spells to come up with "cheap combos" to pay attention to or engage in such a silly thing as "interaction between the players and the DM."

The worst time something like this ever happened to me though was the time I got connected to a gaming group in college where everyone was obsessed with Harry Potter. It might not be a big deal if I too was a fan, but I'm just not. Needless to say, I found the game silly. But you know, to each their own. I like an occasional laugh, even if it does break up the tension a little.

Just no Potter for me, thank you.

Drakevarg
2010-09-17, 10:26 AM
Suprisingly absent in my campaigns. Mostly due to the fact that we generally prefer our own humor.

For example, last session the party's Hexblade was suffering from hallucinatory voices. (This is normal for arcane spellcasters in this setting.) About halfway through the session, I randomly decided that the voices were singing. So, I opened up my online playlist, stuck some headphones in the player's ear, and started playing "Safety Dance."

His character spent the rest of the session dancing a jig. With a Irish accent for some reason, but that might've been because Rocky Road to Dublin was on the same playlist. :smalltongue:

Telonius
2010-09-17, 10:40 AM
What if they instead quote one of the more obscure sketches?

Druid with ranks in Knowledge(nature), showing off, correctly identifies a larch from very far away.

Mando Knight
2010-09-17, 11:26 AM
"Princess Bride" might be a great source of quotes, yet most people in my group wouldn't even notice intrusions from it. :smallannoyed:
...
...
...Inconceivable!

I mean, it's a perfect representation of a semi-lighthearted low-magic fantasy quest. Fencing, fighting, torture, revenge, giants, monsters, chases, escapes, true love, miracles...

...T-Shirts (http://www.thinkgeek.com/interests/giftsunder20/9f70/)...

Shenanigans
2010-09-17, 11:37 AM
...
...
...Inconceivable!

I mean, it's a perfect representation of a semi-lighthearted low-magic fantasy quest. Fencing, fighting, torture, revenge, giants, monsters, chases, escapes, true love, miracles...

...T-Shirts (http://www.thinkgeek.com/interests/giftsunder20/9f70/)...
I agree. "Princess Bride" isn't only an entertaining film (that's right, I called it a film) but the dialog is very sharp.

The-Mage-King
2010-09-17, 11:37 AM
...
...
...Inconceivable!

I mean, it's a perfect representation of a semi-lighthearted low-magic fantasy quest. Fencing, fighting, torture, revenge, giants, monsters, chases, escapes, true love, miracles...

...T-Shirts (http://www.thinkgeek.com/interests/giftsunder20/9f70/)...

And... Plushies (http://www.toynk.com/product/TVT-77002-C/The-Princess-Bride-Fezzik-Talking-Plush.html).

Greenish
2010-09-17, 11:44 AM
I agree. "Princess Bride" isn't only an entertaining film (that's right, I called it a film) but the dialog is very sharp.Didn't the book have sharp dialog then? (I wouldn't know, haven't managed to read it yet.)

comicshorse
2010-09-17, 11:46 AM
Our G.M. only agreed to run Pendragon if we swore to him no Monty Python quotes

Stuff I find gets quoted at our games is Aliens ( Lets take off and nuke the sight from Orbit, it's the only way to be sure) and Splitsecond ( We need big guns ! Bigger ******* Guns !!)

Severus
2010-09-17, 12:45 PM
See the violence inherent in the system!

Telonius
2010-09-17, 01:20 PM
Didn't the book have sharp dialog then? (I wouldn't know, haven't managed to read it yet.)

It did, but the pace is slower. (The S. Morgenstern quotes stuff could have been toned down or written out altogether, and the book would have been a lot tighter, IMO). He's a much better screenwriter than he is a novelist.

Shenanigans
2010-09-17, 01:22 PM
Didn't the book have sharp dialog then? (I wouldn't know, haven't managed to read it yet.)
The book is great; the movie is basically a condensed version of the book. And the book and screenplay were both written by William Goldman, so the flavor of the dialog and the story are preserved.

Greenish
2010-09-17, 01:32 PM
The book is great; the movie is basically a condensed version of the book. And the book and screenplay were both written by William Goldman, so the flavor of the dialog and the story are preserved.Ah, I thought you were emphasizing "film" because you didn't like the book.

Well, gotta get around reading that too.

Shenanigans
2010-09-17, 02:03 PM
Ah, I thought you were emphasizing "film" because you didn't like the book.
No, it's one of the somewhat rare situations wherein I love both the book and the movie. :)

It's a quick-ish and enjoyable read, especially if you're familiar with the film. I never quite realized how well they'd cast the movie until I read the book.

Greenish
2010-09-17, 02:50 PM
No, it's one of the somewhat rare situations wherein I love both the book and the movie. :)Those are indeed rare. Usually, a film based on a good book isn't very good, and good films aren't often based on a good book.

Graphic novels form an exception, though. Maybe because the storytelling methods are closer to each others in graphic novels and films.

Shenanigans
2010-09-17, 02:58 PM
Graphic novels form an exception, though. Maybe because the storytelling methods are closer to each others in graphic novels and films.
I agree, although not every graphic novel movie has been good. (e.g. Watchmen)

I think Sin City is a good example...the books were basically premade storyboards and were followed fairly closely.

On the other hand, something like "Wanted" was just altered too much from the source material.

Greenish
2010-09-17, 03:07 PM
I agree, although not every graphic novel movie has been good. (e.g. Watchmen)

I think Sin City is a good example...the books were basically premade storyboards and were followed fairly closely.

On the other hand, something like "Wanted" was just altered too much from the source material.Ah, of course there are exceptions within exceptions, life is like German grammar in that regard. :smalltongue:

And yeah, I was thinking of the works such as Sin City and V for Vendetta. Watchmen was quite entertaining, though I felt the fighting scenes were perhaps over-choreographed, and many of the fun details would've been missed by people who hadn't read the original comic.

Then there's stuff such as League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. :smallannoyed:


Ah, but I think we digress. Monty Python eh? It was absurdist humour in it's time, but nowadays the humour comes from the known reference, which is quite absurd in itself. :smallcool:

Reis Tahlen
2010-09-17, 03:17 PM
In our group we only "punish" bad quotes. A well placed quote is appreciated and welcome.

Shenanigans
2010-09-17, 03:24 PM
Ah, of course there are exceptions within exceptions, life is like German grammar in that regard. :smalltongue:

And yeah, I was thinking of the works such as Sin City and V for Vendetta. Watchmen was quite entertaining, though I felt the fighting scenes were perhaps over-choreographed, and many of the fun details would've been missed by people who hadn't read the original comic.

Then there's stuff such as League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. :smallannoyed:


Ah, but I think we digress. Monty Python eh? It was absurdist humour in it's time, but nowadays the humour comes from the known reference, which is quite absurd in itself. :smallcool:
Last digression: I liked V for Vendetta as well, both the book and the movie, but they're very different. (One is Anarchy versus Fascism, the other is Liberalism versus Conservatism). We can start another thread elsewhere if we really want to keep discussing. :)

You're right, Monty Python has become so often quoted (in the gaming situation especially) that it's almost expected at certain points, so when you don't quote it say, upon encountering a castle manned by French-accented soldiers, you're somehow being funny.

Eldan
2010-09-17, 03:29 PM
We used to have a rule in our group that if you quoted Monty Python, you got hit with a LARP dagger. Not sure what happened to that rule.

Though one of the guys in the group has NEVER seen Monty Python. :smalleek:

Similarly, our DM, who had been doing Kung-Fu, Kendo and Eskrima for about twelve years at that point, was allowed to punch you.

Thurbane
2010-09-17, 07:00 PM
Actually, Zapp Brannigan (Futurama) is another favorite source of quotes at my games:

"Have the boy lay out my formal shorts..." (whenever anyone is giving someone an unreasonable order or command).

"If we can hit that bullseye, the rest of those dominoes will fall like a house of cards...checkmate!"

Shenanigans
2010-09-18, 12:13 AM
Actually, Zapp Brannigan (Futurama) is another favorite source of quotes at my games:

"Have the boy lay out my formal shorts..." (whenever anyone is giving someone an unreasonable order or command).

"If we can hit that bullseye, the rest of those dominoes will fall like a house of cards...checkmate!"
We often quote Zapp when we detect alignment and come up with neutral.

"What makes a good man go neutral? Lust for gold? Power? Or were you just born with a heart full of neutrality?"

Grytorm
2010-09-18, 09:58 PM
Very prevalent then.

137ben
2010-09-18, 10:11 PM
The group I play in has a gentlemen's agreement to use Monty Python quotes sparingly.

Wow, that is a pretty screwed up group you have! I have never played D&D without Monty Python quotes coming up regularly.

JustIgnoreMe
2010-09-19, 12:47 PM
It did, but the pace is slower. (The S. Morgenstern quotes stuff could have been toned down or written out altogether, and the book would have been a lot tighter, IMO). He's a much better screenwriter than he is a novelist.
But the Morgenstern stuff is the whole point of the book! It would lose most of its impact without it. In fact, it *did* lose most of its impact: the movie, while *awesome*, doesn't have half the emotion of the book, mostly because the father-son dynamic (re-written as grandfather-grandson for Peter Falk and Fred Ward) is cut to practically nothing.

Shenanigans
2010-09-20, 11:13 AM
(re-written as grandfather-grandson for Peter Falk and Fred Ward)
I think you mean Fred Savage.

However, now I want to see a Peter Falk/Fred Ward as grandfather-grandson movie. :)

Amphetryon
2010-09-20, 11:17 AM
I think you mean Fred Savage.

However, now I want to see a Peter Falk/Fred Ward as grandfather-grandson movie. :)

Remo Williams and the Rodents Of Unusual Size! :smallbiggrin:

iElf
2010-09-20, 01:14 PM
...one of our group keeps on quoting planescape torment....and a lot of youtube poop gets quoted with us. but yeah... and now for something completely different is our standard transition phrase

Chipp Zanuff
2010-09-20, 01:28 PM
Anytime someone duplicates the same scene/sketch, they get a 'penalty' (see also: drinking game).

What if they use an elaborate Xanatos Gambit to re-enact the entire skit with setting-appropriate material (such as changing the Duck scene from Ducks and Witches to Gnomes and Lycanthropes for an Eberron game)?