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View Full Version : I'm an Elan, I hide in a hole until the threat dies of old age.



druid91
2011-02-14, 11:39 PM
Has anyone ever had their party try this before? I mean having a party entirely composed of warforged and elans could make for some interesting scenarios as the end of the campaign is literally "we go take a nap until the next challenge comes along." Even if that is a thousand years later.

Lurkmoar
2011-02-14, 11:42 PM
Make them roll sanity after the first six days.

Also, no, that hasn't happened to me. Must make counter plans. Make them role play the long, long wait while I drink a beer...

VirOath
2011-02-14, 11:57 PM
Okay, party telling you that they will hide in a hole until the threat blows over.

Counters:
Divination in general if it's a group that knows of them.

If not, then just twist the campaign. The threat went unchecked and the worst case scenario happened. Why? Because everyone else was of the same mindset, not wanting to deal with it and just protecting themselves.

What does this mean? That they have to deal with the aftermath. Was it an Evil Overlord Seeking To Rule The World? Then it's strip mining and forced labor after he has found a way to become immortal himself (Rather easy really), or they had round the clock divinations to seek out just where the next possible leaders of the rebellion would rise from. And they followed the Evil Overlord List.

Was a World Wide Apocalypse Trigger? Well, now the plane is a living hell of one fashion or another, and that hell is now digging deeper to consume all. Now they PCs get to fight to survive in a hellish waste, against impossible odds to either cut off the source of the Taint, or they get to run away into another plane and try to stop it from happening again, as it starts all over once again, the Taint spreading out and seeking more, now having an anchor.

WeeFreeMen
2011-02-15, 05:00 AM
Okay, party telling you that they will hide in a hole until the threat blows over.

Counters:
Divination in general if it's a group that knows of them.

If not, then just twist the campaign. The threat went unchecked and the worst case scenario happened. Why? Because everyone else was of the same mindset, not wanting to deal with it and just protecting themselves.

What does this mean? That they have to deal with the aftermath. Was it an Evil Overlord Seeking To Rule The World? Then it's strip mining and forced labor after he has found a way to become immortal himself (Rather easy really), or they had round the clock divinations to seek out just where the next possible leaders of the rebellion would rise from. And they followed the Evil Overlord List.

Was a World Wide Apocalypse Trigger? Well, now the plane is a living hell of one fashion or another, and that hell is now digging deeper to consume all. Now they PCs get to fight to survive in a hellish waste, against impossible odds to either cut off the source of the Taint, or they get to run away into another plane and try to stop it from happening again, as it starts all over once again, the Taint spreading out and seeking more, now having an anchor.

THIS. and make sure people know its their fault, especially on another plane. Blame a wizard if you have to. Nothing says "Determination" like clearing ones name.

My party tried this, not with Elan, but Warforged. He later found out that his family died (horribly) and his entire "race" was wiped out. When he was confronted (by a bard) and tried to lie (to bard) the bard called him on it.
He then had "guilt" of his own design and RP'd accordingly.

Then again, this only works if your party cares about RPin and aren't combat drones. Being "Good" helps too.

KillianHawkeye
2011-02-15, 05:37 AM
Problem: Not everything dies of old age.

Ravens_cry
2011-02-15, 05:52 AM
Problem: Not everything dies of old age.
Indeed. Also, some threats are so all encompassing, that hiding away won't stop it from affecting you. Doesn't matter if you're an immortal Elan if the whole biosphere goes up in smoke.

Necro_EX
2011-02-15, 06:18 AM
Two words can keep the party from ever trying that again.

Elder Evil.

Cog
2011-02-15, 07:03 AM
Indeed. Also, some threats are so all encompassing, that hiding away won't stop it from affecting you. Doesn't matter if you're an immortal Elan if the whole biosphere goes up in smoke.
Actually, as long as they can get their hands on a Bottle of Air and can spare a single power point per day...

Comet
2011-02-15, 07:09 AM
Come to think of it, if the party I was in consisted entirely of ageless creatures, I would totally suggest trying to walk the earth for a thousand years to run away from our responsibilities.

Then we could see how everything has gone to hell while we were meditating in the middle of some desert and man up, deliver a passionate speech about how the world is a beautiful place worth saving and charge into danger to right our wrongs.

Then, after all is said and done, we could sit down on the same desert, conclude that a life not lived to the full is not worth living at all, and become proper heroes for the inevitable sequel.

Come on, you don't die of old age. What's the point of that race feature if it doesn't come up in play? :smallwink:

Ravens_cry
2011-02-15, 07:10 AM
Actually, as long as they can get their hands on a Bottle of Air and can spare a single power point per day...
Bottle of Air my help you in an environment filled with a none breathable gas or fluid, it won't protect you against the effects of hard vacuum.

Tengu_temp
2011-02-15, 07:41 AM
Y'know, nothing really stops normal heroes from going "screw it, the bad guy is not my problem, I'm gonna settle down and farm pumpkins" either. But where's the fun in that? Not to mention that all the mayhem the bad guy caused while you were hiding your head in the sand is indirectly your fault.

Flickerdart
2011-02-15, 07:41 AM
Bottle of Air my help you in an environment filled with a none breathable gas or fluid, it won't protect you against the effects of hard vacuum.
There's bling (http://www.d20srd.org/srd/magicitems/wondrousitems.htm#necklaceofAdaptation) that takes care of that, too.

Ravens_cry
2011-02-15, 07:47 AM
There's bling (http://www.d20srd.org/srd/magicitems/wondrousitems.htm#necklaceofAdaptation) that takes care of that, too.
There is magic for everything I suppose. But for anything that can destroy a biosphere so completely as to remove an atmosphere, hiding in a hole won't save you. Still, you're lucky this isn't older editions where it lasted only 7 days.

PersonMan
2011-02-15, 08:01 AM
I don't know why everyone's talking about threats going unchecked and the like-they're, at the end of the campaign, just sitting down and waiting for the next big thing, not hiding from the current one.

I, personally, like the idea.

kestrel404
2011-02-15, 08:03 AM
In a game I played in college, the party found an ancient temple and battled our way past the traps and automated defenses to the basement. There, we found a strange technomgical platform. When we tossed a rock onto the platform, the rock disappeared and a treasure chest appeared.

The treasure chest was full of perishable potions. Perishable potions made from ingredients that had to be harvested fresh from creatures that had gone extinct a million years earlier. After a bit of experimentation, we determined that the platform was actually a form of extradimensional space/stasis chamber. Any physical object that touched the platform was hidden away in a place where time is stopped until the next time something is dropped on the platform (basically, there's always one thing in stasis, but that thing can just be a rock off the floor).

Well, we knew that the potions we got from the platform was enough to sneak us past the evil army that had chased us into the temple in the first place (they were basically invisibility potions), but doing so wouldn't actually get us out of the trouble we were having with the evil empire that was out for our blood. So instead, we fixed all the traps and defenses that we bypassed to get into the temple, chugged the potions, and all hopped onto the platform at the same time.

The GM ended the game session there, told us he had to do some thinking and we all laughed about how crazy what we'd done was - obviously, nobody had gotten that far into the temple in like a million years, right?

So the next game session starts out with us re-appearing some indeterminate point in the future, still invisible (since no time had passed, the potions hadn't worn off yet), in an even more ruined and decayed basement of the same temple, and facing a motley band of adventurers who were looking suspiciously at the platform we were standing on...

Necro_EX
2011-02-15, 08:10 AM
I don't know why everyone's talking about threats going unchecked and the like-they're, at the end of the campaign, just sitting down and waiting for the next big thing, not hiding from the current one.

I, personally, like the idea.

Well, the OP's sort of vague on that, really. The content of the post certainly leads to your scenario, but the title of the thread definitely leads to the other.

druid91
2011-02-15, 08:27 AM
Im actually talking about both. We have all these races that live for a ridiculously long time, yet we only ever use just a few.

Psyren
2011-02-15, 08:32 AM
Actually, as long as they can get their hands on a Bottle of Air and can spare a single power point per day...

Or just manifest Breathless from CPsi...


Okay, party telling you that they will hide in a hole until the threat blows over.

Counters:
Divination in general if it's a group that knows of them.

If not, then just twist the campaign. The threat went unchecked and the worst case scenario happened. Why? Because everyone else was of the same mindset, not wanting to deal with it and just protecting themselves.

What does this mean? That they have to deal with the aftermath. Was it an Evil Overlord Seeking To Rule The World? Then it's strip mining and forced labor after he has found a way to become immortal himself (Rather easy really), or they had round the clock divinations to seek out just where the next possible leaders of the rebellion would rise from. And they followed the Evil Overlord List.

Was a World Wide Apocalypse Trigger? Well, now the plane is a living hell of one fashion or another, and that hell is now digging deeper to consume all. Now they PCs get to fight to survive in a hellish waste, against impossible odds to either cut off the source of the Taint, or they get to run away into another plane and try to stop it from happening again, as it starts all over once again, the Taint spreading out and seeking more, now having an anchor.

These are full of hooks to keep the campaign going, so I approve.

potatocubed
2011-02-15, 08:48 AM
I think there's a lot of mileage in a party that consists entirely of immortal characters, since all it does is give them +1 way to deal with their problems.

There are consequences of just waiting for your enemies to die, sure, but there are consequences of strolling into the Fortress of Death and killing them, too, or of capturing and talking at them until they're your friend forever. All the GM has to do is say "You do X, so Y happens. What do you do now?"

kamikasei
2011-02-15, 08:51 AM
Has anyone ever had their party try this before? I mean having a party entirely composed of warforged and elans could make for some interesting scenarios as the end of the campaign is literally "we go take a nap until the next challenge comes along." Even if that is a thousand years later.
I can't really see myself playing a character with so little investment in the rest of the world besides their party mates that they'd be willing to just do nothing for centuries or longer. "The next challenge" is not the sum of a character's existence.

Psyren
2011-02-15, 08:55 AM
At the same time, you may want to seal yourself away for the good/balance of all, leaving a means to ring you up if a truly disastrous threat rears its head. This is the flavor behind 80% of 4e Epic Destinies "Immortality?" sections.

Frozen_Feet
2011-02-15, 09:12 AM
In my games, whether the PCs are immortal or not, they have full right to say "screw you guys, I'm going home" at any point of the adventure. Sometimes, this means just switching adventures. Other times, it inevitably comes to bite them in the ass. I do my best to give them more possible directions than just one.

A great motivator for the PCs to keep on going is to give them connections with the outside world. For example, if grand majority of a character's wealth is tied down in a mansion, he'll think twice before leaving it unguarded for months to an end.

Like has been pointed out in this thread, playing out repercussions of such plan can be immensely fun. So you spend a millenia sitting out in a cave to wait out that dragon? Well, it's a weird new world outside now, pal.

It doesn't really have to involve a "big bad" or end of the world, or anything of the sort. Not all adventures are about saving the world. Or rather, if the PCs aren't saving the world, someone else still might. The game world can, and should change in ways that are outside the scope of the PCs. So if the PCs sit on their asses and do nothing, that doesn't mean rest of the world will sit on their asses and do nothing. Waiting doesn't have to constitute a failure for the PCs for it to matter.

Erom
2011-02-15, 09:24 AM
"All right, you go hide in a cave for a thousand years. Sound fair. So next session we're playing Shadowrun. Here's the rulebook."

Amphetryon
2011-02-15, 09:26 AM
This sounds like an interesting way to start out a campaign if the party insists on making the 'immortal' racial and/or template choices, actually.

Telonius
2011-02-15, 09:38 AM
Problem: Not everything dies of old age.

I had a similar thought ... "So what if the threat is another Elan?"

Ertwin
2011-02-15, 09:41 AM
So the next game session starts out with us re-appearing some indeterminate point in the future, still invisible (since no time had passed, the potions hadn't worn off yet), in an even more ruined and decayed basement of the same temple, and facing a motley band of adventurers who were looking suspiciously at the platform we were standing on...

how'd that turn out?

Psyren
2011-02-15, 09:41 AM
I had a similar thought ... "So what if the threat is another Elan?"

Then you get Trigun

JeminiZero
2011-02-15, 09:43 AM
I could actually see this as a viable option, Austin Powers style. You know, how in the first movie, Dr Evil got himself cryogenically frozen and they did the same thing to Austin so that when Dr Evil returned at some point in the indeterminate future, they would have his nemesis to fight him.

Similiarly, if the Big Bad is sealed in a can that lasts for a thousand years, our Epic PCs (who beat him into the can the first time) might want to be around to ensure that when he re-emerges from the can once more, they will be around to finish him off.

The outright immortal members of the party can either wander the planes during that time, or go into hibernation. The not-so-immortal members HAVE to go into hibernation, possibly via Quintessence (http://www.dandwiki.com/wiki/SRD:Quintessence), and await their immortal friends to wake them up at the right time.

Yuki Akuma
2011-02-15, 10:03 AM
There is magic for everything I suppose. But for anything that can destroy a biosphere so completely as to remove an atmosphere, hiding in a hole won't save you. Still, you're lucky this isn't older editions where it lasted only 7 days.

Actually removing a planet's atmosphere doesn't require that much world-shattering power... Just take some anihilating matter from the Negative Energy Plane and close a few natural portals to the Plane of Air.

It'll take a while, but darnit, that atmosphere is going away.

jpreem
2011-02-15, 10:04 AM
You know there are a lot of folk legends about ancient heroes in a slumber ready to wake in a time of need. It would actually be cool if your party would be one of those - after some epic struggle they seal themselves in a tomb and promise that they will return after proper rites are done to wake them.

So ... a blank screen ... and now the tomb is opened and the heroes step into a wholly different world somewhere in the distant future - where their heroics are once more needed.

Draconi Redfir
2011-02-15, 10:08 AM
In a game I played in college, the party found an ancient temple and battled our way past the traps and automated defenses to the basement. There, we found a strange technomgical platform. When we tossed a rock onto the platform, the rock disappeared and a treasure chest appeared.

The treasure chest was full of perishable potions. Perishable potions made from ingredients that had to be harvested fresh from creatures that had gone extinct a million years earlier. After a bit of experimentation, we determined that the platform was actually a form of extradimensional space/stasis chamber. Any physical object that touched the platform was hidden away in a place where time is stopped until the next time something is dropped on the platform (basically, there's always one thing in stasis, but that thing can just be a rock off the floor).

Well, we knew that the potions we got from the platform was enough to sneak us past the evil army that had chased us into the temple in the first place (they were basically invisibility potions), but doing so wouldn't actually get us out of the trouble we were having with the evil empire that was out for our blood. So instead, we fixed all the traps and defenses that we bypassed to get into the temple, chugged the potions, and all hopped onto the platform at the same time.

The GM ended the game session there, told us he had to do some thinking and we all laughed about how crazy what we'd done was - obviously, nobody had gotten that far into the temple in like a million years, right?

So the next game session starts out with us re-appearing some indeterminate point in the future, still invisible (since no time had passed, the potions hadn't worn off yet), in an even more ruined and decayed basement of the same temple, and facing a motley band of adventurers who were looking suspiciously at the platform we were standing on...


"All right, you go hide in a cave for a thousand years. Sound fair. So next session we're playing Shadowrun. Here's the rulebook."


These are both awsome:smallbiggrin:

also it reminds me of a part of an old webcomic called "chainmail bikini." The heroes were after some goblins who had taken a farmers bigs and lived inside a small mountan. so what did they do? lock all the doors from the outside and sit around for a month or two while the goblins inside starved to death XD

Mark Hall
2011-02-15, 11:17 AM
also it reminds me of a part of an old webcomic called "chainmail bikini." The heroes were after some goblins who had taken a farmers bigs and lived inside a small mountan. so what did they do? lock all the doors from the outside and sit around for a month or two while the goblins inside starved to death XD

We had a party try that... sealed all the entrances to a kobold cave. The Kobolds became a living wall, started sucking the dead out of a nearby graveyard. The party's sponsor was not happy.

Tiki Snakes
2011-02-15, 11:44 AM
We had a party try that... sealed all the entrances to a kobold cave. The Kobolds became a living wall, started sucking the dead out of a nearby graveyard. The party's sponsor was not happy.

I can see how trying to block in a race of fanatically decicated miners/tunnelers could end badly. :smallsmile:

Mark Hall
2011-02-15, 12:19 PM
I can see how trying to block in a race of fanatically decicated miners/tunnelers could end badly. :smallsmile:

2nd edition. Kobolds didn't start getting a lot of good fluff until 3rd.

grimbold
2011-02-15, 12:25 PM
You know there are a lot of folk legends about ancient heroes in a slumber ready to wake in a time of need. It would actually be cool if your party would be one of those - after some epic struggle they seal themselves in a tomb and promise that they will return after proper rites are done to wake them.

So ... a blank screen ... and now the tomb is opened and the heroes step into a wholly different world somewhere in the distant future - where their heroics are once more needed.

that would be pretty awesome

another way to punish a sleeping party is to have unfriendly dwarves find them and abuse them in some way.

Percival
2011-02-15, 12:39 PM
In a game I played in college, the party found an ancient temple and battled our way past the traps and automated defenses to the basement. There, we found a strange technomgical platform. When we tossed a rock onto the platform, the rock disappeared and a treasure chest appeared.

The treasure chest was full of perishable potions. Perishable potions made from ingredients that had to be harvested fresh from creatures that had gone extinct a million years earlier. After a bit of experimentation, we determined that the platform was actually a form of extradimensional space/stasis chamber. Any physical object that touched the platform was hidden away in a place where time is stopped until the next time something is dropped on the platform (basically, there's always one thing in stasis, but that thing can just be a rock off the floor).

Well, we knew that the potions we got from the platform was enough to sneak us past the evil army that had chased us into the temple in the first place (they were basically invisibility potions), but doing so wouldn't actually get us out of the trouble we were having with the evil empire that was out for our blood. So instead, we fixed all the traps and defenses that we bypassed to get into the temple, chugged the potions, and all hopped onto the platform at the same time.

The GM ended the game session there, told us he had to do some thinking and we all laughed about how crazy what we'd done was - obviously, nobody had gotten that far into the temple in like a million years, right?

So the next game session starts out with us re-appearing some indeterminate point in the future, still invisible (since no time had passed, the potions hadn't worn off yet), in an even more ruined and decayed basement of the same temple, and facing a motley band of adventurers who were looking suspiciously at the platform we were standing on...

THAT... is super cool. That would be an interesting situation to play out, and just a cool story to think about.

Fox Box Socks
2011-02-15, 12:47 PM
This is really only a problem until the thing the Elan is hiding from is another Elan.

Also, setting aside the insanity problem, not every scenario can be solved by waiting it out, even if the threat is mortal. If a vicious Ogre raises a horde of monsters and vile mercenaries to topple a kingdom, the Orge's forces stand a good chances of wiping that culture off the face of the earth forever. Countless works of art, music, literature, and advances in the fields of science, learning, philosophy, mathematics and magic could be gone forever, and simply waiting around is never going to bring them back. Worse, the toppling of the kingdom could throw the region into chaos as neighboring countries either view the toppled kingdom as weak and swoop in for a swift conquering or former allies try to avenge the deaths of their fallen comrades. Who knows how long the ensuing war would last? Who knows how many thousands of lives would be lost because of a situation the Elan could have helped resolve? Worse still, the Ogre might set up a brutal dictatorship and establish a dynasty built on subjugation, slavery, and abuse of human (and demihuman) rights, which might last anywhere from dozens to thousands of years.

All of which the Elan could have put a stop to if he hadn't been too afraid of standing up to the Ogre in question. Being immortal doesn't mean mortal lives are suddenly no longer important; any Elan with an alignment other than anything Evil would have a tough time convincing himself that sitting around twiddling his thumbs while a threat continues to kill and rape and pillage the land is the somehow the right course of actions.

Necro_EX
2011-02-15, 01:18 PM
Hell, if you were playing in a non-specific campaign setting or an alternate material plane from Greyhawk you could transition into Dark Sun rather nicely. Now they have to deal with the fact that their self-imposed isolation lead to that.

What I was thinking was, assuming they're of high enough level, throwing Ragnorra into the mix. Her greater sign would definitely be enough to bring them out of hiding, to say the least.

Warlawk
2011-02-15, 03:05 PM
Hell, if you were playing in a non-specific campaign setting or an alternate material plane from Greyhawk you could transition into Dark Sun rather nicely. Now they have to deal with the fact that their self-imposed isolation lead to that.

That's actually a really cool idea, I think I'm going to make myself some notes for the next time I end up running a game to combine the ancient temple, stasis platform/chamber and then transition it into a dark sun game.

Mark Hall
2011-02-15, 05:34 PM
Why am I reminded of the alternate ending of Army of Darkness?

Hazzardevil
2011-02-15, 05:47 PM
In a game I played in college, the party found an ancient temple and battled our way past the traps and automated defenses to the basement. There, we found a strange technomgical platform. When we tossed a rock onto the platform, the rock disappeared and a treasure chest appeared.

The treasure chest was full of perishable potions. Perishable potions made from ingredients that had to be harvested fresh from creatures that had gone extinct a million years earlier. After a bit of experimentation, we determined that the platform was actually a form of extradimensional space/stasis chamber. Any physical object that touched the platform was hidden away in a place where time is stopped until the next time something is dropped on the platform (basically, there's always one thing in stasis, but that thing can just be a rock off the floor).

Well, we knew that the potions we got from the platform was enough to sneak us past the evil army that had chased us into the temple in the first place (they were basically invisibility potions), but doing so wouldn't actually get us out of the trouble we were having with the evil empire that was out for our blood. So instead, we fixed all the traps and defenses that we bypassed to get into the temple, chugged the potions, and all hopped onto the platform at the same time.

The GM ended the game session there, told us he had to do some thinking and we all laughed about how crazy what we'd done was - obviously, nobody had gotten that far into the temple in like a million years, right?

So the next game session starts out with us re-appearing some indeterminate point in the future, still invisible (since no time had passed, the potions hadn't worn off yet), in an even more ruined and decayed basement of the same temple, and facing a motley band of adventurers who were looking suspiciously at the platform we were standing on...

I must find someone who will let me try that scenario!

Anyway, back on topic I don't know why it remidns you of an army of darkness.

Loki_42
2011-02-15, 05:57 PM
Come to think of it, if the party I was in consisted entirely of ageless creatures, I would totally suggest trying to walk the earth for a thousand years to run away from our responsibilities.

Then we could see how everything has gone to hell while we were meditating in the middle of some desert and man up, deliver a passionate speech about how the world is a beautiful place worth saving and charge into danger to right our wrongs.

Then, after all is said and done, we could sit down on the same desert, conclude that a life not lived to the full is not worth living at all, and become proper heroes for the inevitable sequel.

Come on, you don't die of old age. What's the point of that race feature if it doesn't come up in play? :smallwink:

I wouldn't ever play a character that just hid from trouble like that, but it could make a good backstory.

kestrel404
2011-02-15, 06:02 PM
Yeah, I thought it was a pretty awesome game at the time.


how'd that turn out?

We snuck out of the temple (leaving the other party of adventurers behind to look on in confusion at the empty treasure chest) and went back out into the world. After a bit of gathering info, we found out that the evil kingdom we had escaped had grown up into an evil empire over the course of a few thousand years, and that all of the villians we had to defeat were either still there or had left descendents that we would have to defeat.

Basically, the plot remained unchanged except all of the threats became more threatening and we were remembered in the history books as sort of a cross between 'the last great rebellion' and 'the ones that got away'.

As such, we used our legendary status and the reduced security of the empire to start up the 'new rebellion'.

Ormur
2011-02-15, 06:54 PM
If the campaign (or maybe it's not a campaign at all, it wouldn't be a problem in a sandbox game or) is properly structured and the players are simply doing this as an unorthodox solution to a particular problem, not actively trying to derail something or ignoring the plot then I don't see it as a problem.

Lurkmoar
2011-02-15, 09:54 PM
Why am I reminded of the alternate ending of Army of Darkness?

Because it was pretty cool, and was a nice sequel hook that never came to pass?

Endarire
2011-02-16, 12:16 AM
Your group could decide to be all elves and take 10 on Profession checks for a century. You'd be level 1 people with thousands or millions of gold!

If you're Elan, this can become far higher!

RTGoodman
2011-02-16, 02:19 AM
You know there are a lot of folk legends about ancient heroes in a slumber ready to wake in a time of need. It would actually be cool if your party would be one of those - after some epic struggle they seal themselves in a tomb and promise that they will return after proper rites are done to wake them.

So ... a blank screen ... and now the tomb is opened and the heroes step into a wholly different world somewhere in the distant future - where their heroics are once more needed.

Yeah, it's the "King in the Mountain" motif - basically every culture in the world has a myth like that. Arthur in Britain, Frederick Barbarossa or Charlemagne in Germany, Owain Glyndwr for the Welsh, and tons of others.

That would actually be a REALLY sweet beginning to a campaign. The PCs are heroes of old awakening at the time of greatest need, but have to regain their abilities after centuries or millennia asleep. You can start at pretty much any level and have them go from there. Heck, you don't even need immortal PCs if you assume they had some sort of Epic ability to go into stasis like that originally.