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Synvallius
2013-03-15, 07:55 PM
I'm creating a new setting, and I find myself in need of some help with the names for some human nations. So far all I know about them is that they're going to be based off of old English-Germanic names, and maybe some Italian sounding names. The countries themselves are going to be a mixture of feudalisms, monarchies, and probably a few republics (if that helps). Here are the, few, names that I have so far.
Valdemar
Bormont
Calvaris
Deyroth
Ebelvard
Also, I've been trying to figure out what the people from each nation would be called, so if you have any ideas for what the people from Valdemar and (got Valdemar) Deyroth should be called (aside from "Deyrothians," I just don't care for the sound of that) that would also be quite helpful.
Well, that's all I have, so if anyone comes up with any good names along those lines and doesn't feel like keeping them to themselves, I'd appreciate the help.

Octopusapult
2013-03-16, 12:14 AM
I'm creating a new setting, and I find myself in need of some help with the names for some human nations. So far all I know about them is that they're going to be based off of old English-Germanic names, and maybe some Italian sounding names. The countries themselves are going to be a mixture of feudalisms, monarchies, and probably a few republics (if that helps). Here are the, few, names that I have so far.
Valdemar
Bormont
Calvaris
Deyroth
Ebelvard
Also, I've been trying to figure out what the people from each nation would be called, so if you have any ideas for what the people from Valdemar and (got Valdemar) Deyroth should be called (aside from "Deyrothians," I just don't care for the sound of that) that would also be quite helpful.
Well, that's all I have, so if anyone comes up with any good names along those lines and doesn't feel like keeping them to themselves, I'd appreciate the help.

People from Indiana, USA are called "Hoosiers."

I've lived there for quite a few years and I have no idea why that is... So the name for the people-from-a-place doesn't necessarily need to sound (or have much relevance) to the place in question. Bonus points for writing out a well detailed reason that calling them by this name is an insult / compliment.

Chilingsworth
2013-03-16, 12:19 AM
Dreyroth = Rothi, maybe? (Have Dreyroth translate into "land of the Roth" in their language or one of their neighbor's languages.)

Tovec
2013-03-16, 01:04 PM
I tried to convert the nation names into "-ians" (minus the ian :P) But, at least for me, it would help to know the full names (or what the names mean) for these nations as well as what kinds of governments. If a country is tribal then it is going to have a very different name for people from that place than one that is a full blown republic/democracy.

If you have a group I suggest you ask them. They may have a simple idea based on how you are saying it or what their impression of the place is. When I started out I had no idea that I would be using Thekish* and Thekan** to be correct forms (for different things) for objects, people and places from Thek.


*Refers to people/culture of Thek.
**Refers to geography/area within Thek.

sktarq
2013-03-16, 03:44 PM
As for names. If you are going for Anglo-Germanic sounding names go to a translation website or grab a few English to ***** dictionaries for Norse, Dutch, German, French and Gaelic languages (finding closly related but obscure languages are even better-Island Flemish, Highland Scot, Occetian, Olde High German etc) . Start typing in things. You may not get a perfect name but it gives you great starting points adding an sylable here or there to smooth it out, twist the pronunciation, or whatever. Another help is to pick your own words for things that come up in place names allot. Land, Town, Hamlet, River crossing/ford, fort, saltworks, hill, etc. use the above meathod to get half a name and clamp on the suffix (or flip the two if it feels if should be that way in the laguage) you made up and it will feel like the names belong together. Perhaps even mix common suffixes with prefixes of different languages to demarkate a relationship between two lands (all lands that were part of the ****** empire use lst of suffixes A, the lands settled by refugees of empire &&&&&& use suffix list B, the regions the used to be gnoll lands use list C and those human lands that were settled in the shadow of a now vanished elven kingdom use list D even though the both the elves and people who originally settled there are long since past then even if you give them all the same prefixes and have them all speak common you still have lots of variety without things seeming random or garbled. . . using whatever empires, kindoms, etc that are approriate to the History of your world. Different waves of migration work just as well.
As for the what to call adjective use of a Nation. This above idea of ethnic or historic groups can be used to mix it up and give a place favor. -ates, -ese, -ians, -ius, to start and don't be afraid to make one or two up. -alar off the top of my head for example. Add a couple total surprizes if you want-perhaps a historal term for a region, or a trabial or leaders name that doesn't match or never assimialated into the langauge-Netherlands vesus Dutch for example. Also different suffixes may MEAN different things if you wish. Say one refencing culture versus a nation for example. To use the Thek example above say you have a tribe called the "Thek" they enter to region and take over an area (displacing the rules but not all the native say) and soon name it for themselves say "Thekia" - Sommeone or somthing from that nation no matter if native or of the new rulers could be "Thekian". Now perhaps not all of the tribe of Thek stayed with the main group and/or married out into neighboring regions...or perhaps they brought a new cultural tradition that caught on and natives in other nation started making things in the style of those that the tribe of Thek had brought with them....perhaps "Thekish" would describe these people and objects. And to top it off the enthic group is known as the Daret afte the word brother in the original language of the tribe of Thek
One of the fun side effects of doing this is that it is easier to build up and name good ruins to scatter about. And showing the roots of current languages give the ruins a sense of place and in general greater versmilitude.

Synvallius
2013-03-16, 08:43 PM
To Octopusapult: I believe that the term Hoosier originates from back in the days when settlers were traveling the plains and when they came across other settlers they would say "Hoosier" meaning either "who's here" as in "who do we have here" or it meant "who're you" meaning what's your name; although I'm not entirely sure on the validity of either of those, I vaguely remember reading something about that before. And I agree with you, that the names for a people don't necessarily need to be derived from there land of origin, however I'm not sure what the names should be as of yet.
To Chilingsworth: My opinion on adding an "i" to the end of a name is that it works but makes the people sound sort of... tribal. The people of Deyroth are going to be a small isolated pseudo-England, which I suppose I should have mentioned what the people were like, my own fault, but thank you for the suggestion.
To Tovec: As above, I suppose I should have said what the nations were and how the people are as you are entirely correct that the system of government can often change the name of the people within the nation. (The Soviet Union, the Chinese Dynasties, other random examples from history, etc.) Well, for government styles the Valdemarians (as I believe I'll call them, unless there's a better idea put forth) are going to be a monarchy, with a limited republican system, a very small senate or something akin to that. The Bormontese (as I believe I'll call them, I like the sound of it) are probably going to be a republic. The Calvarisians (same as either above) are a patchwork of city states, much like ancient Greece each one is fairly different in their governmental style. The people of Deyroth are a limited monarchy with a strong republic backing it up. And the people of Ebelvard (I'm thinking of calling them Ebelvarder, but I'm not sure on that yet) are going to be some sort of monarchy, possibly more towards the feudalistic side of things. I'm open to any suggestions for names that follow that same basic outline, and most of the governments for the other nations (which have no names yet) are going to be like those above, a mixture of monarchies, republics, feudalisms, and maybe even a theocracy. And geographically speaking, nearly every nation is out on the open prairie, with a few rivers criss-crossing the land. Some of them are near the sea, and a few are up north in the tundra, if that helps.
To sktarq: All excellent suggestions, and good advice. I particularly like the idea of coming up with my own way of saying "ians," and I may steal the term -alar although I'm not sure which nation I'd append that one too as of yet.
Thank ye all who have responded, if you get anymore ideas I'd be obliged for the help.