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View Full Version : Clever riddles, traps, and tricks of a dungeon



Arkhosia
2013-07-28, 03:54 AM
What is the most clever thing you have ever used or want to use in an adventure?

VariSami
2013-07-28, 06:55 AM
This riddle (in a campaign set primarily against the Aurum):

To nine grunts thee will be wed,
their bands of metal strengthened.
While yer child is no gold, nor silver,
he remains an ancestor of steel and pewter.
Speak thine name, oh pauperís treasure,
become the key to wealth of no measure.

(Answer: Tin)

Also, I had a room with nothing but portraits of a noble house's previous patriarchs and matriarchs, each portrait including a name and a quote. (From their order you could clearly view how the world had changed over the generations and how the family in question had become fiend-blooded over time.) Later, there would be a sentry statue which states the name of a previous family head by random and if the quote from that person is not given in response, it will trigger an alarm and cause the statue to animate.

(Not to mention the not-so-subtle-but-effective reference joke I included in the mansion. Basically the current head of the house looked like Dark Confidant from Modern Masters (MtG; really looks like Skrillex) and was named Maher ir'Skylex, Bob Maher being the name of the person who designed the card. A statue of him was also seen posing in the fashion shown in the original art of the card.)

Elvenoutrider
2013-07-29, 09:04 PM
I had a dungeon where the opening was a hallway filled to the brim with traps - dart holes, axes out of walls, floor traps, etc.

on the wall in front was a plaque that read:

a clever trap before you
impassable it may seem
a rogues devices worked against
and magic fails to glean
a great reward and glory wait
for those who still stand tall
too bad the only way to pass
is someone take the fall

the answer was for someone to lie down and crawl on their belly to get to the end

NichG
2013-07-29, 09:47 PM
A riddle referring to a (non-standard) elemental damage type that I never got to use:

"A sinner of many torments. Burned, beaten, and drowned, then turned a slave to serve the slaughter."


Metal, in a system with Fire, Air, Wind, Water, Metal, and Wood as the elemental damage types.

Arkhosia
2013-07-29, 10:03 PM
Love all of them, especially the metal one.
I have one:
One wrested
Two blended
Three bested
Four rended
Armor/clothing: materials taken from a plant, animal, or eart forcefully, made by melding materials together, bested by weapons that can cut/smash/fire through the outfit, outfit is destroyed, either by being bested or by getting rid of it after being bested.
The numbers only signify the order in which these happen.

pteromath
2013-07-29, 10:44 PM
My favorite trap was a long hallway that spiralled in on itself until the PCs arrived in a 10' x 10' room.

About fifteen feet into this hallway, they find odd stains on one wall, stains that look like old blood. About ten feet later they see a scrap of cloth stuck between two tiles in the floor.

"This hallway is trapped! One of them blurts.

The rogue starts searching for traps, and finds a few, but they've all already been triggered. And they pass by more evidence of different traps. A scorched wall, a dead body, etc.

Finally they make it to the end of the hallway, in that 10x10 room. All that is in the room is a massive treasure chest.

They thoroughly check it for traps, and find none, but still end up wasting a scroll of knock to get it open. It opens. It's full of treasure.

They hear an ominous clicking sound.

Everyone ducks, expecting traps to go off. They don't. The PCs gather the treasure and leave.

and THAT is when they realize that opening the chest caused all the hallway traps to reset.

Hilarity ensued.

Zavoniki
2013-07-29, 11:56 PM
The players find a giant room with a rope hanging from the middle. When they all enter the room walls slam down over all the exits and a voice starts counting down from 10. If the players pull the rope the voice goes back to 10 and starts the count down all over again. The room can prevent scrying/teleportion/magic/whatever you need such that the players cannot get out.

If they let the timer count down to 0, the walls covering the exits move back up and they can leave the room.

Arkhosia
2013-07-30, 12:22 AM
Wow guys. Just wow. Those traps are too funny and cool for words.

Kane0
2013-07-30, 12:52 AM
My favorite trap was a long hallway that spiralled in on itself until the PCs arrived in a 10' x 10' room.

About fifteen feet into this hallway, they find odd stains on one wall, stains that look like old blood. About ten feet later they see a scrap of cloth stuck between two tiles in the floor.

"This hallway is trapped! One of them blurts.

The rogue starts searching for traps, and finds a few, but they've all already been triggered. And they pass by more evidence of different traps. A scorched wall, a dead body, etc.

Finally they make it to the end of the hallway, in that 10x10 room. All that is in the room is a massive treasure chest.

They thoroughly check it for traps, and find none, but still end up wasting a scroll of knock to get it open. It opens. It's full of treasure.

They hear an ominous clicking sound.

Everyone ducks, expecting traps to go off. They don't. The PCs gather the treasure and leave.

and THAT is when they realize that opening the chest caused all the hallway traps to reset.

Hilarity ensued.

Genius. I would not like to be in that situation.

Notreallyhere77
2013-07-30, 03:34 AM
The spiral hallway one was so good, it made it into the Book of Challenges.

For me, the most clever trap is still unused. It's a giant trapped room that, if one remains calm, will provide its own exit. The trick is remaining calm after most of the floor drops down, is pierced by spikes (which also pierce victims) and starts to flood with water. And then the outer edges of the room, which did not fall, start disappearing when the walls close in. I wrote a script, round by round, about what it would do, up until one of the swinging axes over the bridge conveniently stopped moving and allowed safe passage to the entryway.

One thing I did in-game aready was put a pair of clay golems in a room with multiple overlapping acid fogs. It was like giving them fast healing.
I also made a room with 5' high walls in a zig-zag maze pattern, with a lever at the end of the room that unlocks treasure on another floor. The room in question was populated by Shadows with warrior levels and the spring attack feat. That made for an exciting challenge.


Soon, I'm putting my players through a room with a frictionless floor, sword blades all over the walls, and a roper hanging from the ceiling (around a corner - not visible from the entrance). It may seem cruel, but these are really good players who have been asking for challenging combats, so I'm stepping up my game from the usual stuff.

DigoDragon
2013-07-30, 06:46 AM
The most infamous trap I've made was a door with a carved elven face on it. Instructions on the door dictate to knock twice or say it aloud to activate the door. It responds with "Who's There?"

Simply, you tell it any knock-knock joke and it'll let you in. Failure to tell the joke gets you blasted with magical energy. It's a good thing this door wasn't on the main path of the dungeon because after two full hours of failing to unlock the door (DC was only 25 and they were around 11th level) and failing to break the magical traps (terrible damage rolls), the party gave up and left.

I sometimes like to remind them of how I defeated the party with a knock knock joke.

hicegetraenk
2013-07-30, 07:20 AM
If we define my "best riddle" as the thing that cost my players the most time and ressources to overcome, then it was a door that was shut, and the room behind it was collapsed.

So after lockpicking the door, they tried pushing, pulling, knocking,disable mechanisms, getting a battering ram, dispelling magic, shrinking themselves to fit through the keyhole, the cleric asking his god for advice, using true sightand more than 1 hour of time played, they just destroyed it to find out, that there was nowhere to go behind the door. Poor lvl 17 party.

Jay R
2013-07-30, 09:47 AM
One room had a giant pillar of jade. If somebody touches it, there is darkness, dizziness, and when their eyes work again, the pillar is now worthless clay.

Later, their map seems to be inaccurate.

In fact, touching the pillar sets off a Teleport, and they are sent to another room, identical except for the pillar. The nearby hallways are also identical, so that when they get to the parts that are not identical, there's no reason to suspect the pillar had anything to do with it.

----------

In the dungeons beneath the Castle of the Mathemagician, there were levels that were in fact the five (Platonic) polyhedral solids. Local gravity pointed to the center; going through a door from one room to the next was always dizzying, and dwarves were disoriented and slightly sick. If the dwarf made his Wisdom roll, he would say, "North is that way," pointing overhead.

turbo164
2013-07-30, 01:45 PM
I recently threw a "crazy wizard's tower" at the group. Some of the rooms didn't go as well as planned, but the two they enjoyed the most:

Floor 2: Doors slam shut behind you, room is dark, from the ceiling descend 4 dog-sized cockroaches.
Upon their defeat, 2 horse-sized roaches descend.
Upon their defeat, 1 twenty-foot roach descends.
Upon its defeat...
the front half of a 40 foot roach splots to the ground, and the doors open. Each wave was double the size but half the quantity

Floor 3: Triangle in center of room summons a stone golem.
Upon its defeat, a glowing mummy-like figure appears. Knowledge Arcana - looks like a...scroll golem?
Upon its defeat, a humanoid construct made of blades appears. Upon closer inspection...a scissors golem???

The players noticed the pattern, but didn't expect there to be actual mechanics to the gimmick; they used their usual assortment of axes, arrows, and fireballs. The Rock was resistant to slashing, but took massive damage from Scrolls. The Scrolls was resistant to stone (Slings mostly, and a few spells) and did bonus damage + entanglement to the guy wearing Stone Plate (which was a happy coincidence, I designed this floor long before he rolled his character). The Scissors was resistant to scrolls, took massive damage from stones (slings, or chunks of the defeated stone golem as improvised weapons), did bonus damage to people wearing cloth armor but avoided the guy wearing stone.

Upon reflection starting with the Scroll golem might have been better, as seeing fresh, lootable scrolls on the ground would have encouraged their use vs the Rock, rather than assuming it was just a straight MM-stone golem when it showed up first. But then, the Scissors golem was rather obvious coming third and they didn't try anything special vs it, so w/e.

Kol Korran
2013-07-30, 01:51 PM
My favorite trap was a long hallway that spiralled in on itself until the PCs arrived in a 10' x 10' room.

About fifteen feet into this hallway, they find odd stains on one wall, stains that look like old blood. About ten feet later they see a scrap of cloth stuck between two tiles in the floor.

"This hallway is trapped! One of them blurts.

The rogue starts searching for traps, and finds a few, but they've all already been triggered. And they pass by more evidence of different traps. A scorched wall, a dead body, etc.

Finally they make it to the end of the hallway, in that 10x10 room. All that is in the room is a massive treasure chest.

They thoroughly check it for traps, and find none, but still end up wasting a scroll of knock to get it open. It opens. It's full of treasure.

They hear an ominous clicking sound.

Everyone ducks, expecting traps to go off. They don't. The PCs gather the treasure and leave.

and THAT is when they realize that opening the chest caused all the hallway traps to reset.

Hilarity ensued.

This reminds me of a similar dungeon-trap I created. The dungeon had all kinds of hints of traps, that never activated, or other "dangerous" stuff, that didn't seem to happen (Like corridors with Stoen dragon faces with motuh open to the size, a hall with Sarcophagi that were locked and didn't open, and so on...) The party came to think of most of these as "flavor texture". They reached the final room, got what they came for, when the room locked on them. And they could hear all kind of rambling from the outside.

They finally got it open, when water rushed in... The dungeon was flooding, and quickly, and all the stuff that didn't do anything? well, now it did! (Two dungeons for the price of one!) they needed to rush past traps, constructs and undead, and try to find the exit.

As a bonus- the exit was blocked, and they needed to find a way to the new exit (which they didn't know where it was). 67 rounds it took them, and they barely made it. My only regret is that some had access to water breathing magic. Should have made it sand instead! :smallbiggrin:

Another idea I quite liked, and my players enjoyed, was a sort of a "maze of personalities". Basically, the players were is a special realm, that was constructed of various people personalities and memories. In each "Room" one of the player took on the personality of one of these people, and the rest were "supporting cast". They needed to act the scene out, coming to soem sort of a resolution to it, all the while they had to maintain the make belief for the main character in the "room", or else the scene would collapse, and they'll be thrown in the realm randomly.

different solutions led to different memories. It was a bit like "Who's line is it anyway", and was a lot of fun. some good goofy roleplay fun. Some of the memories were "neutral", as they didn't affect the characters much, and held decisions on the line of a trial in session, reading of a will and distributing it, a difficult promise on a death bed and so on.

Other memories were less neutral, either of NPCs who were close to the party (that revealed some of their secrets, or what they thought of the PCs, or just stuff from the past), and some even held the memories of the PCs themselves. And they didn't always play their own selves. It was interesting to see how different players pay the same character, if for a short interlude.

The idea is a bit difficult to play and execute, but quite fun. I tried it twice, with different groups, in different situations. the first was a trial that was fun, but was mechanically awkward, and didn't have enough interesting choices. The second run went splendid!

Doomboy911
2013-07-30, 03:34 PM
Upon an arch in cerulean letters read "Prove your wisdom and you may pass". Past the arch upon a humongous gate reads an impossible riddle using mathematics, ancient literature and euclidean geometry.

How do you get past this? Simple do what no player will do admit that they don't know and prove your wisdom.

Arkhosia
2013-07-30, 05:57 PM
Upon an arch in cerulean letters read "Prove your wisdom and you may pass". Past the arch upon a humongous gate reads an impossible riddle using mathematics, ancient literature and euclidean geometry.

How do you get past this? Simple do what no player will do admit that they don't know and prove your wisdom.

In a similar vein: In a wizard's lair, when the PCs near a statue of a enormous barbarian, the statute tells them that to get out of the sealed room, you must prove your intelligence.
If you say any simple factual thing that an idiot may understand, you get to leave
Intelligence level:
Wizards>barbarians

Shoot Da Moon
2013-07-30, 06:23 PM
One neat thing I've seen in a module was a magical stone face that you put money into so you could consult an oracle about the dungeon.

The trick was, every even question was answered truthfully but odd questions were responded to with subtle lies. The hint that this was the case is that a bit of graffiti in the room said "Beware the odds!!"

You could also break open the stone face to get at the piles of money was well, a neat touch.

It is a cool set piece that presents the GM a way to manipulate the players in clever ways while still giving the party a valuable tool.

eulmanis12
2013-07-30, 06:43 PM
by four brothers an attack is dealt
the first rests on the warrior's belt
it strikes at the second one
by the third you rest when they are done
the fourth's task is to put you there
now tell me this or you beware
found in river, hand, in pair, and three
who do these four brothers be

Answer
The Suits in a deck of cards
1st Clubs (a weapon)
2nd Hearts (a strike to this is fatal)
3rd Diamonds (found underground, dead bodies are buried underground)
4th Spade (A spade is a shovel, used to bury the body)
Cards are dealt into hands, in poker the first three turned up are called the river, in poker you try to get good hands such as a pair, or three of a kind

falloutimperial
2013-07-31, 11:13 AM
I ran a time-themed area featuring a door with a stone face on it which commanded "You must prove your respect of and dedication to history. Wait here." The solution, of course, is to know that history isn't made by those who wait around. My players waited for over a day before they opened the door.

Doomboy911
2013-07-31, 12:06 PM
I ran a time-themed area featuring a door with a stone face on it which commanded "You must prove your respect of and dedication to history. Wait here." The solution, of course, is to know that history isn't made by those who wait around. My players waited for over a day before they opened the door.

I made a sort of dimension hopping campaign they had been given some custom magic items, the first was a mirror which showed your true self, the other a wooden box which produced little candy and sweets. Knowing I had an idiot on our team he devoured it.

They later came across some oddly coloured sand which popped you off to different dimensions. They did something even I didn't plan they went into the dimensions and searched for the box again. The idiot continued to eat whatever came out of the box. He was hungry I suppose. One of the worlds was all cartoony and rubbery. They discovered that they need to steal a piece of a talisman scattered across each world. Which makes the world fight back. They think that the cartoony one will be the safest.

They grab the talisman in the cartoony land and the guy who keeps eating candy finds that whatever world he's in he becomes one with by eating the food. So he's all stretchy. Suddenly trees start growing out of the ground trying to stop their escape. One of them manages with the talisman while the stretchy and rubbery one gets pinned by two trees, his legs are sticking out one end and the rest out the other. They figure they can burn through the trees but the guy who can do this is long gone. So they just decide to talk and play cards for a day while their spells recharge.

Cat Dungeon
2013-07-31, 12:10 PM
Giant, powerful (electro)magnets! The fighters will hate you for it!:smallwink:

Doomboy911
2013-07-31, 12:44 PM
Giant, powerful (electro)magnets! The fighters will hate you for it!:smallwink:

Actually in a story I'm writing a mage trapped in an iron golem gets beat that way.

"How can you do this I'm immune to all magic"
"Physics ain't magic"

Monss Meg
2013-08-02, 08:49 PM
I have one from a campaign that ended before i could use it.

The first few rooms of the ancient dwarven toom are heavily plastered, and the walls bare warnings for all grave robbers. ant the end of this bit that find a sealed door,opening this they find stare traveling down a roughly hewen passage way. with dark rock viable in the ceiling. and the stare are coved in a dark dust

Yes, the dark rock is coal, and the dust is coal dust. :smallbiggrin:

Arkhosia
2013-08-02, 09:09 PM
I have one from a campaign that ended before i could use it.

The first few rooms of the ancient dwarven toom are heavily plastered, and the walls bare warnings for all grave robbers. ant the end of this bit that find a sealed door,opening this they find stare traveling down a roughly hewen passage way. with dark rock viable in the ceiling. and the stare are coved in a dark dust

Yes, the dark rock is coal, and the dust is coal dust. :smallbiggrin:

Nice!
I have one:
A room with a massive pool in the center with illusory sharks. A long rope hangs above.
When a person hangs from the rope, the ceiling above collapses.

The ceiling holds up sodium crystals.

Toy Killer
2013-08-03, 12:00 AM
I have an idea for trap I've never got to utilize. A octigonal room, the floor divided into eight equal triangles, each with a tapestry hanging from the ceiling and a matching rune on the floor. As soon as the players enter, the doors seal shut and the tapestry fly off. The locks can be picked, but the tapestries attack at random, flying by and slicing with ruthless determination.

When the players kill a tapestry, it deals 1d6 force damage to whomever is standing on the matching space. For each one that dies, the damage goes up a D6 for each space 'ignited'. Specced to kill things in a single blow? hope you can fend off the rogue without killing the tapestries while the lock is picked!

I always find subverting the players core concepts of what they will be doing in a game of D&D to be the best way to induce horror.

From Thirteen Dusks, I had a Prominent Devil called 'The Candle man' who turned innocent citizens, painfully, into walking wax. Then he blew out the lights and fought the party in a Deeper Darkness. Light an innocent of fire to be able to see him? Or all be put in danger by him when you can't see what he's doing, what he's up to in the cathedral he was encountered.

Extra points for playing scream tracks when they decided to light the pour soul ablaze.

Nettlekid
2013-08-03, 06:23 PM
Floor 3: Triangle in center of room summons a stone golem.
Upon its defeat, a glowing mummy-like figure appears. Knowledge Arcana - looks like a...scroll golem?
Upon its defeat, a humanoid construct made of blades appears. Upon closer inspection...a scissors golem???

The players noticed the pattern, but didn't expect there to be actual mechanics to the gimmick; they used their usual assortment of axes, arrows, and fireballs. The Rock was resistant to slashing, but took massive damage from Scrolls. The Scrolls was resistant to stone (Slings mostly, and a few spells) and did bonus damage + entanglement to the guy wearing Stone Plate (which was a happy coincidence, I designed this floor long before he rolled his character). The Scissors was resistant to scrolls, took massive damage from stones (slings, or chunks of the defeated stone golem as improvised weapons), did bonus damage to people wearing cloth armor but avoided the guy wearing stone.

Upon reflection starting with the Scroll golem might have been better, as seeing fresh, lootable scrolls on the ground would have encouraged their use vs the Rock, rather than assuming it was just a straight MM-stone golem when it showed up first. But then, the Scissors golem was rather obvious coming third and they didn't try anything special vs it, so w/e.

THIS. IS. BEAUTIFUL. I've got to use this at some point. I would love a battle between maybe a Stone Golem, a Grisgol, and Slaughterstone Eviscerator, or something like that, to work this way. Maybe have the players control a set of the three, and the BBEG have the same, and the BBEG and players decide secretly which of the three they'll send out to do battle with the other. Or something. I dunno. Either way, it's brilliant.

I had a pretty long dungeon once, and to stop people from getting bored halfway though I threw in a minigame with a giant statue asking D&D trivia questions. I originally planned for smaller statues to attack them if they got the answers wrong, but decided that more battle would clog things up, so they just kept guessing. I also gave them internet access because I'm much more a nerd than they are, so I knew they might be vague about some of the answers. I tried to increase them in difficulty, but they found #3 by far the hardest.
The riddles were:
1. In the veins of my cousin run the blood of ancient beasts. He sneers but I feel more at home partaking wine and feats. We're both quite Charismatic, with a flair for the dramatic, but while he struts and waves his hands I'll tell his tales in distant lands! What am I? A Bard. The cousin is a Sorcerer, a fellow Cha-based caster powered by dragonblood.

2. My stomach spans a room or more, or less if master's cheap. But when you're wanting space in spades you'll find no better keep. Unlike my brother Triple-H you'll have to rummage 'round, but don't you fret that what's inside me never will be found! What am I? A Bag of Holding. Triple-H is Heward's Handy Haversack.

3. My eyes are too vivid, my color too deep. I lost my old body but my strong mind I keep. I once was a human, but my life turned the page. I forever seek knowledge, never dying of age. What am I?An Elan.

4. Of the many capable, devoted there are three. Three paths, six paths, five paths, each to guide to destiny. Only the latter, the user of five, can hope to master my art. But if he does, no lasting harm will shake his iron heart. What am I? Iron Heart Surge. The devoted three are Crusader, Swordsage, and Warblade, who have three, six, and five schools available to them, respectively.

5. So long you have time to act, you just might stay alive. No need to move, immediately speak and you'll survive. If you would fail for lack of speed and one more moment's all you need, fear not the daze that lies ahead and act to save your skin instead. What am I? Celerity. "Immediately speak" refers to it having only a Verbal component, and is an immediate action spell. It worked better being spoken, because "fear not the daze that lies ahead" sounds much like "fear not the days that lie ahead," and you might hear the difference grammatically.

Bonus Riddle: I once knew three men of great intellect and power. Skilled in their art, they went on to do great things and their names are immortalized in countless tomes. The first was a man of weak stomach and will, for whom the difficult life of an adventurer proved too intense. He wished never to be without protection, shelter, and the comfort of a luxurious life. The second man was passionate. He gesticulated wildly, and often his hands said more than he did. The third was sinister, a man you'd rather not get too near. His habits of reaching out to those around and drawing them in with little hope of escape made him a dark figure indeed. Tell me, what were the names of these three men? Mordenkainen, Bigby, and Evard. I know that in the canon the personalities of these three were quite different, but I was going just off of the descriptions of the spells which bear their name.

Ivellius
2013-08-03, 08:11 PM
The riddles were:

I feel like such a nerd. I knew all of them except I missed one of the bonus answers (I thought of Leomund).

Arkhosia
2013-08-03, 08:51 PM
A dragon's lair has only a small stone symbol of Tiamat.
If you break it open, you'll find a bag of holding with the dragon's entire hoard inside.

pteromath
2013-08-03, 09:17 PM
The spiral hallway one was so good, it made it into the Book of Challenges.

Yeah! That's where I got it from! I knew the idea had come from another source, but I couldn't remember it, now I feel dumb. Haha.

I like the idea of a trap where everyone has to remain calm in order to escape.


I had one where you walked through a doorway, and it led you into a small room that was completely empty, except there was a free-standing doorway in the center of the room. If you walk in, then turn around and go back through the doorway, nothing happens. You just walk through and are on the other side of the room. There are no other doors, windows, or possible exits. BUT if you step into the room, go around the doorway, and walk through it, you go to the next part of the dungeon.

Silverbit
2013-08-03, 09:18 PM
One which I've mentioned several times on this board:

The party finds a room with "The Garden Of Element"s engraved somewhere prominent. The room contains a roaring fire, a fountain, a rockery and a light breeze. Both the fire and the fountain are elementals of the respective element, but the earth elemental is hidden in the stone floor, whilst the room doesn't actually contain an air elemental. Watch your players try to find it :smallsmile:.

Nettlekid
2013-08-04, 12:35 AM
I feel like such a nerd. I knew all of them except I missed one of the bonus answers (I thought of Leomund).

Good for you, and I think I'd have accepted Leomund, what with the huts. I've just always called Mordenkainen weak-stomached for needing a mansion and a caravel.

The one that took the longest was 3, because people insisted it was a Lich, and while I said that was a pretty good answer, glowing red eyes weren't really vivid, the color thing didn't connect, and never dying of age doesn't really apply to something that's already dead. We had a campaign earlier that had an Elan in it, and so they should have known it (and facepalmed when they finally got it.) I eventually had to hold their hands and go "Just look up 'Immortal D&D races!'...hmm...no, maybe it's not here after a-" and then we saw "Elans used to be humans, but were transformed etc. etc." and I glared at my friend, who had a derp expression. It was quite amusing.

Arkhosia
2013-08-13, 07:34 PM
Good for you, and I think I'd have accepted Leomund, what with the huts. I've just always called Mordenkainen weak-stomached for needing a mansion and a caravel.

The one that took the longest was 3, because people insisted it was a Lich, and while I said that was a pretty good answer, glowing red eyes weren't really vivid, the color thing didn't connect, and never dying of age doesn't really apply to something that's already dead. We had a campaign earlier that had an Elan in it, and so they should have known it (and facepalmed when they finally got it.) I eventually had to hold their hands and go "Just look up 'Immortal D&D races!'...hmm...no, maybe it's not here after a-" and then we saw "Elans used to be humans, but were transformed etc. etc." and I glared at my friend, who had a derp expression. It was quite amusing.

Ahhhh, mind lapses...

Doomboy911
2013-08-13, 09:15 PM
So here's a little beauty I whipped up called mirrored madness. So your heroes enter to find their reflection. A winding tunnel of mirror that spirals to the center. As they make their way around they find five levers. One in the center and one in each of the four corners of the circle as they work their way in. The levers do nothing unless they're all pulled at once. Than the mirrors all rotate and form five tunnels that lead to the walls separating everyone. Now comes the beauty. If they paid attention to the mirrors they'd notice that their reflections are off. Either the image inside is off, they don't have a reflection or their reflection isn't mirroring them. These mirrors are mimics, mirrors with the mirror walking spell spell and of course mirrors of opposition. The mirrors with mirror walking will only take them to other mirrors with the spell cast on it, if they pass by the mirror of opposition they have themselves to deal with and the mimics are the most fun of all. Since they're so deadly.

Also something on mimics, a very scary image. The heroes find a set of armor that matches each of them, it'll fit them and they look nice. So you know how they have some helmets that have a bit of metal that you pull up to look at stuff, the armor has that. They pull it up to look in and along the metal and the helmet are grisly sharp teeth, the inside of the armor just one giant throat.