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kinem
2014-07-08, 10:27 AM
Yagnoloth (revised)

Large Outsider (Evil, Yugoloth)
Hit Dice: 10d8+40 (85 hp)
Initiative: +2 (Dex)
Speed: 50 ft.
AC: 21 (-1 size, +2 Dex, +10 natural), touch 11, flat-footed 19
Base Attack/Grapple: +10/+24
Attack: Mwk longsword +10 melee (1d10/19-20) or slam +20 melee (1d6+10 plus stunning blow)
Full Attack: Mwk longsword +10/+5 melee (1d10/19-20) and slam +20 melee (1d6+10 plus stunning blow)
Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft.
Special Qualities: DR 10/good, SR 25, yugoloth traits (immune to poison and acid; cold, fire, and electricity resistance 10; telepathy 100', darkvision 60')
Special Attacks: Breath weapon, energy drain, spell-like abilities, stunning blow (Fort DC 19), muscular arm
Saves: Fort +11, Ref +9, Will +9
Abilities: Str 30 (10 with smaller arm), Dex 14, Con 19, Int 15, Wis 15, Cha 16
Skills: Bluff +16, Climb +23, Concentration +17, Diplomacy +20, Intimidate +18, Jump +23, Knowledge (the planes) +15, Listen +15, Sense Motive +15, Spot +15
Feats: Ability Focus (breath weapon), Ability Focus (stunning blow), Power Attack, Weapon Focus (slam)
Climate/Terrain: Any land and underground (Gehenna)
Organization: Solitary
Challenge Rating: 9
Treasure: Standard and mwk large longsword
Alignment: Always neutral evil
Advancement: 11-30 HD (Large)
Level adjustment: +4

In the feudal-like hierarchy of Gehenna, most yagnoloths are minor lords. Each such lord rules over a territory, with vassal yugoloths at its beck and call. The rationale behind this arrangement is not clear to outsiders, since yagnoloths are neither stronger nor brighter than many of their subjects. Whatever the reason, the ruling powers of Gehenna enforce the existing order, and the yagnoloths profit from it. In fact, the yagnoloths squeeze every advantage possible from their positions, up to and including sanctioning executions of yugoloths that are considerably more physically and magically powerful than themselves, but lower in the hierarchy. Such actions are little different from what any yugoloth would do if given the opportunity.

Nonetheless, the fact that the yagnoloths’ authority exceeds their personal power has earned them a special sort of resentment. (One theory is that the ultroloths keep the yagnoloths in power to divert complaints from themselves. When a lesser yugoloth has a gripe with his superiors, as they often do, that anger is likely to be aimed at his yagnoloth lord.) No other yugoloth can pass up an opportunity to betray its yagnoloth overlord — for the right price. As a secondary effect of their despised status, yagnoloths cannot summon other yugoloths.

A few yagnoloths choose to wander rather than rule. These often either are soon killed, or go on to achieve enough combat experience and personal power that they are usually left alone to do as they want.

A yagnoloth is humanoid and stands 10 to 15 feet tall. Its hide is red and scaly; its head is small and skeletal and topped by ears resembling bats’ wings. A yagnoloth’s favored arm is enormous, thickly knotted with muscles, and long enough to drag on the ground. It uses this arm for its slam attack. The other arm appears small in comparison and is about the size of a normal human arm.

Combat

A yagnoloth attacks with both arms in melee. It typically wields a large masterwork (or better) longsword with its smaller arm, but that arm is fairly weak (Str 10) and a typical yagnoloth does not receive any Strength bonus when using it. An exceptionally strong specimen, or one whose strength is magically enhanced, could still have a Strength bonus with that arm but recieves no racial bonus to Strength with it.

Breath Weapon (Su): As a standard action, a yagnoloth can exhale a cloud of acid every 1d4 rounds. This cloud affects a 5-foot cone for 1 round. A creature in that area takes 2d6 points of acid damage (no save) and must make a Fortitude save (DC 21, Con-based) or be nauseated for 1 round. Yagnoloths are immune to this attack.

Energy Drain (Su): The yagnoloth can drain life force from an unconscious or stunned creature. The yagnoloth places its head against the victim’s flesh as a swift action. For each full round the yagnoloth remains in contact, the victim gains 1d4 negative levels; this is a full round action for the yagnoloth. To remove each negative level the Fort save DC is 18 (Cha-based).

Spell-Like Abilities: At will — deeper darkness, see invisibility; 3/day - fear (30' cone, Will DC 17), shocking grasp (1d8+10), teleport without error (self plus 50 pounds of objects only). Caster level 10 (as HD); save DC 13 + spell level (Cha-based).

Stunning Blow (Ex): Any creature struck by a yagnoloth’s massive arm must make a Fort save (DC 19, Wis-based) or be stunned for 1 round.

Muscular Arm (Ex): A yagnaloth’s larger arm functions as a primary natural weapon, even when it is used to make secondary attacks. This ability negates any secondary attack penalty and allows the yagnaloth its full Strength bonus with its slam, whether the attack is primary or secondary.

Yugoloth Traits: A yugoloth is immune to poison and acid. It has cold, fire, and electricity resistance 10. Yugoloths can communicate telepathically with any creature within 100 feet that has a language. Outsiders breathe, but do not need to eat or sleep (although they can do so if they wish).

Advancement: Increase SR by 1 for each class level, and by 1 for every 2 racial HD above 10.

kinem
2014-07-08, 10:35 AM
Design notes:

The MM2 yagnoloth's stun attack was overpowered. It made the monster much more powerful than the descriptive text indicated. Also, it made no sense that just because the creature's arm was big and muscular, it had such a stunning effect that even larger monsters like giants and dragons could not achieve, and it do so as a EX ability even if it barely scratched the opponent (e.g. doing 12 damage to a 312 hp fighter, but potentially stunning him from the blow for 12 rounds).

In this version, the stunning blow has been brought in line with the standard stunning fist mechanic, and it has been made a slam rather than a claw, as stunning attacks usually are punches or the like.

Debihuman
2014-07-08, 02:12 PM
Nice revision. Just a few minor nit picks to make it look even better.

MM2 was written using 3.0 rules before the monster rules were codified. DC 25 wasn't based on the creature's ability, it was based on "difficulty" of relative saves. 5 easy, 10 average, 15 hard, 20 difficult, etc. This is also why so many creatures are missing feats. The number of feats wasn't originally based on the creature's HD.

I think you should switch strength line to Str 10 (30 with muscular arm slam) since the Attack line lists the attack with the weapon held first. Damage is normally written with the word plus between numbers and special abilities: (1d6+10 plus stunning blow). Since the Muscular Arm Slam is unique to this creature, you should note that in the attack lines as well. Last of all, masterwork weapons are usually abbreviated as "mwk."

Attack: Mwk longsword +10 melee (1d10/19-20) or muscular arm slam +20 melee (1d6+10 plus stunning blow)
Full Attack: Mwk longsword +10/+5 melee (1d10/19-20) and muscular arm slam +20 melee (1d6+10 plus stunning blow)

Also, muscular arm special ability should be consistent with the fact it uses a slam and not a claw. Ditto for the Weapon Focus feat which lists claw but should be slam.

Muscular Arm (Ex): A yagnaloth’s larger arm functions as a primary natural weapon, even when it is used to make secondary attacks. This ability negates any secondary attack penalty and allows the yagnaloth its full Strength bonus with its slam, whether the attack is primary or secondary.

SR is a little high for CR. I like how Pathfinder standardized it: CR + 11. A 9th level caster has to roll 16 or higher to overcome the creature's current SR 25. That's an 80% failure rate. Are you sure that's appropriate?

Debby

kinem
2014-07-08, 06:06 PM
Nice revision.

Thanks, though I have not forgiven you for you-know-what.


MM2 was written using 3.0 rules before the monster rules were codified. DC 25 wasn't based on the creature's ability, it was based on "difficulty" of relative saves. 5 easy, 10 average, 15 hard, 20 difficult, etc. This is also why so many creatures are missing feats. The number of feats wasn't originally based on the creature's HD.

Not true. The MM2's DC 25 was from the standard formula, based on Str (DC = 10 + 1/2 HD + Str bonus = 10 + 5 + 10). That sort of makes sense to use, but I wanted a lower DC, and I also wanted to make it more like Stunning Fist which uses Wis.

In 3.0, the number of feats was based on the creature's HD, but also on its type; e.g. outsiders only got 1 feat for every 4 HD, plus the one at 1st level. In 3.5, it is standardized at 1 feat for every 3 HD regardless of type, plus the one at 1st level.


I think you should switch strength line to Str 10 (30 with muscular arm slam) since the Attack line lists the attack with the weapon held first.

No, the overall creature is big and strong. That matters for things like grapple and carrying capacity.


Last of all, masterwork weapons are usually abbreviated as "mwk."

OK.


Also, muscular arm special ability should be consistent with the fact it uses a slam and not a claw. Ditto for the Weapon Focus feat which lists claw but should be slam.

OK.


SR is a little high for CR. I like how Pathfinder standardized it: CR + 11. A 9th level caster has to roll 16 or higher to overcome the creature's current SR 25. That's an 80% failure rate. Are you sure that's appropriate?

75%. It helps make up for the fact that the monster has few ranged attacks (it does have a 30' fear cone SLA) and doesn't really do that much damage in melee either. These yugoloth lords may not be all that powerful, but they don't go down right away either.

Also, in Pathfinder, casters do need to worry about SR (well, against flying creatures they do; otherwise they can use hungry pit). In 3.5, they use orb spells and can cast assay spell resistance.

Debihuman
2014-07-08, 10:43 PM
Thanks, though I have not forgiven you for you-know-what.
Does this mean you'll actually let me out of the doghouse at a later date perhaps?


Not true. The MM2's DC 25 was from the standard formula, based on Str (DC = 10 + 1/2 HD + Str bonus = 10 + 5 + 10). That sort of makes sense to use, but I wanted a lower DC, and I also wanted to make it more like Stunning Fist which uses Wis.
Ah, and here I thought they were just pulling numbers outa their a--thin air. And now I learned something new.


In 3.0, the number of feats was based on the creature's HD, but also on its type; e.g. outsiders only got 1 feat for every 4 HD, plus the one at 1st level. In 3.5, it is standardized at 1 feat for every 3 HD regardless of type, plus the one at 1st level.
I never saw those rules codified in the books. I think there was an article in Dragon Magazine about that. I really only started designing monsters with 3.5 though I did design NPCs earlier.


No, the overall creature is big and strong. That matters for things like grapple and carrying capacity.
Hmm. Yeah, I see that.


75%. It helps make up for the fact that the monster has few ranged attacks (it does have a 30' fear cone SLA) and doesn't really do that much damage in melee either. These yugoloth lords may not be all that powerful, but they don't go down right away either.
There I go channeling BarbieTM, "Math is hard" again.


Also, in Pathfinder, casters do need to worry about SR (well, against flying creatures they do; otherwise they can use hungry pit). In 3.5, they use orb spells and can cast assay spell resistance.

I had to look up assay spell resistance; that would be very useful in this situation. That's the hazard with spellcasters, you never will know if the spells you picked are the ones you'll need.

Debby