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Quellian-dyrae
2007-04-07, 03:50 PM
Basically an alignment-specific warrior, kinda like the paladin but broader in scope. Might be somewhat overpowered (par for the course with me), but I'm hoping that the restrictions help to balance it out.


The Champion

Unlike clerics, paladins, blackguards, and similar very alignment-dedicated characters, champions are not tied to a religious order and need no divine backing. They are paragons of their alignment, personally dedicated to their beliefs with such fervor that they can draw on the power of their spirits to serve their cause. Champions use their powers to detect their opposition, and oppose them with furious zeal.

Champions adventure to further the cause of their alignment, although in general it is the champions of good and chaos who do the most adventuring. Champions of law are more likely to serve as elite guards and knights in the service of their lands, while champions of evil are usually more likely to be growing a power base rather than adventuring. Champions of neutrality are perhaps the least likely to actively adventure, more prone to watching and preserving delicate balances.

Champions are powerful warriors, and their place in battle is always on the front lines. Although a fighter or barbarian might claim the edge in a straight clash of arms, the championís zeal makes it superior against foes of its opposition. Champions also back up their skill at arms with a few supernatural powers, potent resistances to certain forms of magic, and useful detection abilities.

Champions are somewhat less likely than, say, paladins to try to direct the entire party to follow its path, but there are certain things that a champion just wonít do. Their companions must sometimes understand that the champion will refuse to aid them if they choose to take certain courses of action.

Strength and Constitution are both important for champions as they help it hold the field for longer. Charisma determines how often they can use their spiritual powers and also governs their effectiveness, as well as being useful for some of their skills.

HD: d10.
SP: 4.
Skills: Concentration, Craft, Diplomacy, Handle Animal, Heal, Intimidate, Knowledge (Nobility and Royalty, Religion), Listen, Perform, Profession, Ride, Sense Motive, Spot.
Proficiencies: Martial weapons, all armor, all shields.

Champion
{table=head]Level|BAB|Fort|Ref|Will|Special

1st|
+1|
+2|
+0|
+2|Aura, Detect, Zeal +1.

2nd|
+2|
+3|
+0|
+3|Mettle.

3rd|
+3|
+3|
+1|
+3|Spiritual Power.

4th|
+4|
+4|
+1|
+4|Reveal

5th|
+5|
+4|
+1|
+4|Zeal +2.

6th|
+6|
+5|
+2|
+5|Immunity.

7th|
+7|
+5|
+2|
+5|

8th|
+8|
+6|
+2|
+6|Sense.

9th|
+9|
+6|
+3|
+6|Zealous Pride.

10th|
+10|
+7|
+3|
+7|Zeal +3.

11th|
+11|
+7|
+3|
+7|Improved Spiritual Power.

12th|
+12|
+8|
+4|
+8|Immunity, Perceive.

13th|
+13|
+8|
+4|
+8|

14th|
+14|
+9|
+4|
+9|

15th|
+15|
+9|
+5|
+9|Zeal +4.

16th|
+16|
+10|
+5|
+10|Discern.

17th|
+17|
+10|
+5|
+10|

18th|
+18|
+11|
+6|
+11|Immunity.

19th|
+19|
+11|
+6|
+11|Greater Spiritual Power.

20th|
+20|
+12|
+6|
+12|Expose, Zeal +5.[/table]

Aura (Su): Upon taking a level in the champion class, the character must select law, chaos, good, evil, or neutrality as its dedication. The champion must select one of the components of its own alignment. Only true neutral champions may select neutrality; champions who are only neutral on one axis must select the non-neutral component. The championís dedication also determines its opposition; good and evil are in opposition, as are law and chaos. Neutrality is in opposition to the extreme alignments (LG, CG, LE, and CE).

The championís aura of alignment for purposes of its dedication is equal to its class level.

Detect (Sp): A champion can use detect {alignment} as a spell-like ability at will. It may detect either members of its dedication or its opposition.

Zeal (Ex): Champions fight with furious zeal against members of their opposition. Against such foes the champion receives a +1 bonus on attack rolls, weapon damage rolls, AC, and saving throws.

Mettle (Ex): Starting at 2nd level, the champion gains the mettle ability.

Spiritual Power (Sp): Although champions are not spellcasters, they can tap into their spiritual power for magical effects that support their dedication. A champion may utilize its spiritual powers as a standard action a number of times per day equal to its Charisma modifier.

The champion receives its spiritual power at 3rd level. At levels 11 and 19 the championís spiritual power improves.

The save DC for these abilities are 10 + Ĺ the championís level + the championís Charisma modifier.

Good: A good champion uses its spiritual powers to heal. By spending one use of its spiritual power, it cures a number of hit points to a touched target equal to twice its champion level. At 11th level this increases to five times its champion level, or the champion can heal twice its level to all allies within 20í. At 19th level the champion can heal ten times its level, or five times its level to allies within 20í. The champion channels positive energy to utilize this healing, and thus can harm undead creatures with it (undead receive a Will save for half damage).

Evil: Evil champions use their powers to spread fear. A 3rd level champion can render a single target within medium range frightened for one round per class level if the target fails its Will save. At 11th level it can render a single target panicked or a 60í cone frightened. At 19th level the champion can panic a 60í cone, or affect a single target as if from a Phantasmal Killer spell (but using the normal save DC for this ability, rather than the DC for the spellís level).

Law: Lawful champions utilize abilities that compel their opponents. A 3rd level champion can Charm a single target within medium range. The target may make a Will save to avoid the effect; otherwise it is charmed for one day per class level. At 11th level the champion can instead compel the target as with a Suggestion spell. At 19th level the champion can dominate the target.

Chaos: Chaotic champions wield the powers of change. At 3rd level it can utilize a polymorph effect lasting one minute per class level to take the shape of a creature of its type, receiving 5 alterations per class level. At 11th level it instead receives 10 alterations per level and can utilize the following types in addition to its own: Animal, Fey, Giant, Humanoid, Magical Beast, Monstrous Humanoid, Vermin, and the effect lasts for ten minutes per level. At 19th level it receives 15 alterations per level, can also become an Aberration, Dragon, Elemental, Ooze, Outsider, or Plant, and the effect lasts for up to one hour per level.

((Note: the polymorphing rules used here refer to my homebrew polymorph revision. For standard play, replace the first ability with Alter Self, the second with the ability to cast Polymorph, and the third with the ability to cast a Polymorph that lasts for one hour per level and does not have the 15 HD cap)).

Neutrality: A neutral champion commands the ability to neutralize magic. At 3rd level it can cast Dispel Magic, but with no maximum on the dispel check and only using the Counterspell function. At 11th level it can also use the targeted dispel and can counterspell as an immediate action. At 19th level it gains the area dispel and can counterspell as a free action.

Reveal (Sp): Starting at 4th level, whenever the champion uses its Detect ability, it can choose to selectively reveal the information it receives to creatures within 60í.

Immunities (Ex): As they advance, champions gain immunities based on their alignments.

Good: A 6th level champion of good is unswerving in the face of even the most horrible of evils, receiving immunity to fear. At 12th level its spirit is so pure that it purges the body of malicious effects, granting immunity to poisons and diseases. At 18th level the championís soul is so pure that no forces can wither it, and it receives immunity to all negative energy and death effects.

Evil: A 6th level champion of evil has seen so many horrors that no terrors can affect it; it becomes immune to fear effects. At 12th level the evil championís soul is so corrupt that external malignancies become moot, and the champion gains immunity to poisons and diseases. At 18th level the championís corrupt spirit is too dark for similar forces to hamper it, and the champion becomes immune to all negative energy and death effects.

Law: A 6th level champion of law cannot be easily swayed by beguiling influences; it gains immunity to charm effects. At 12th level its dedication to duty precludes any magical commands, granting immunity to compulsions and possession effects. At 18th level not even magical force can preventing it from upholding its duty; the champion becomes immune to effects that constrain its movement, as if it were under the effects of a permanent freedom of movement spell.

Chaos: A 6th level champion of chaos refuses any outside influence, gaining immunity to charms. At 12th level, its opposition to authority denies any mental influence, making it immune to compulsions and possessions. At 18th level, even spells cannot deny its freedom; the champion acts as if permanently under the effects of a freedom of movement spell.

Neutrality: Champions of neutrality do not develop immunities to any specific force, but their abilities to balance the forces wielded against them minimize the impact of energy forces. At 6th level a neutral champion gains resistance 10 to all energy types. This becomes resistance 20 at 12th level and resistance 30 at 18th level.

Sense (Sp): An 8th level champion is so attuned to the aura of members of its dedication or opposition that it automatically senses whether or not such beings are within 60í. It does not know where, how many, or how strong the auras are; it only knows that they are present. This effect can be blocked by the same materials as detect spells.

Zealous Pride (Ex): A 9th level champion is so sure of the superiority of its dedication that it refuses to fail any test against a member of the opposition. The champion now adds its Zeal bonus on all opposed checks made against members of its opposition. If the opposed check is such that it already received the Zeal bonus (such as the opposed attack roll of a sunder attempt) it does not receive the bonus twice.

Perceive (Sp): Starting at 12th level the championís Detect ability affects a spread 5í in radius per champion level, centered on the champion. The championís Reveal and Sense abilities also increase in range to 5í per level.

Discern (Sp): A 16th level champion who uses its Detect ability receives information as if it had been concentrating for three rounds.

Expose (Sp): So strong are the detection abilities of a 20th level champion that everyone around gets a sense of the opposition within their midst. All creatures within the championís Perceive range (including the champion itself) receive a +10 circumstance bonus on all Spot, Listen, and Sense Motive checks made against members of the championís opposition who are also within the radius.

Champion Restrictions:

Champions do not draw their power from a deity or other higher power; it comes from their spiritual dedication to the ideals of their alignment. As a result, they do not have to follow the strict codes that paladins and some other alignment-specific classes have to follow for fear of losing their abilities. However, the championís power access does have certain pragmatic restrictions. Firstly, the champion cannot use either its zeal ability or spiritual powers to help perform an act aligned to its opposition. For example, a champion of law attempting to overthrow a tyrant (a chaotic act) would be unable to use its zeal or spiritual powers to fight the tyrantís guards, but if it got attacked by brigands in the woods, independent of the tyrant, its abilities would function normally against them. Likewise, once the tyrant is defeated, the championís powers would function at full strength.

However, as paragons of their alignments, each champion does have a certain specific restriction that they must abide. Treat a champion as if it were under the effects of a Geas spell requiring it to follow these dictates. Most restrictions have some caveats wherein the champion can ignore the restriction without hindrance.

Good: A good championís primary goal is to protect life. Champions of good never kill when it is easy, only when it is necessary. Champions of good are prohibited from killing any creature with an Intelligence of 3 or higher for purely personal benefit (such as, to take its treasure, out of anger or vengeance, and so on). The character may reap a personal benefit as a side effect (if it kills a tribe of orcs to stop them from killing farmers, it can take its normal share of the treasure) but it never kills solely for its own gain.

A champion of good is also prohibited from killing a neutralized opponent; if the foe is no longer a threat, the champion will not slay it.

There are some caveats to these restrictions. First, the rules simply donít apply to any creature with the evil subtype or an overwhelming aura of evil (they do apply to evil creatures with auras of lesser strength than overwhelming). The champion may also kill in purely self-defense, although most try to avoid killing in such circumstances. If a champion shows mercy to an evil creature and that creature later attacks the champion or is caught harming others again, the champion may eradicate the evil it represents without remorse.

The champion does not strictly force its code upon others, but it is likely to rebuke those who kill without what the champion deigns good cause. Additionally, the champion is prohibited from aiding an attack made solely for personal gain (the champion will not help its allies fight a creature for the purposes of taking its treasure). Not only does this prevent the champion from attacking, but it also cannot heal or use other abilities to support the attack. The only aid it can render is that it will stabilize a dying ally. Aside from that, the champion will not provide healing support during the battle and may not heal the wounds inflicted afterwards.

The champion is prohibited from healing any character that slays a helpless foe or a foe who has surrendered until that person receives an Atonement spell from a good-aligned cleric (this does not cost the cleric XP). The only exception is that the champion may use its healing powers to stabilize that character if it is dying.

Evil: A champion of evil strives only for personal benefit at any expense. Champions of evil never provide aid without receiving some equal (or preferably superior) gain in return. The champion of evil will not help another character unless it receives some tangible benefit commensurate to the aid provided.

Positive emotion does count as beneficial, to the extent that it will warrant basic help. The champion will not take risks or make sacrifices simply for the benefits of positive feelings. For example, an evil champion will not leap into battle to save a friend or family member, unless some greater reward is forthcoming.

If circumstances require immediate action, the champion may aid another with the understanding that it will exact appropriate payment as soon as possible. If the aided character fails to deliver, the champion must do what it can to rescind the benefits of the aid. For example, if the champion leaps into battle to save someoneís life and then that person does not deliver appropriate recompense, the proper response is to try to kill it, either directly or subtly as appropriate to relative levels of power and circumstance. This restriction also does not prohibit the champion from giving care to its children if any (one assumes theyíll be useful to it once they have grown). If a relationship in general provides a tangible benefit then the champion may provide standard, expected help at no additional cost, but specific favors or going out of the way to help still require some form of additional incentive. For example, an adventuring champion would help its party in battle and on quests; this is expected aid and the rewards of the added firepower make it worth the championís while. If one of the party members wanted to hunt down a personal foe, however, the champion would require some sort of reward for helping.

Naturally, the evil champion in no way forces its restriction on others. Those that want to provide aid (specifically, to the champion) without anticipation of reward are more than welcome to do so.

Law: Champions of law are dedicated to upholding the regulations of society. Even corrupt laws or laws that allow harm to come to people are preferable to anarchy. As a result, a champion of law may not break the laws of the society it is in.

Very obscure laws that the champion does not know of do not penalize the champion, but once it becomes aware of these laws it must obey them as well. This restriction does not apply to a society that is, itself, an enemy of the champion. If the championís party is attacking an orc tribe, the champion is not expected to follow the orcish laws (although it should still follow any standard regulations governing conflict or ďrules of warĒ). An enemy government does not make the society an enemy; if attacking minions of an evil baron is illegal in the barony, the champion wonít do so (too much risk of other people getting the wrong idea and starting a bloody rebellion).

The champion must also follow any direct orders given by a superior. In conflicts of interest, the laws of its homeland matter first, then the orders of its ruler or lord, then the laws of the society it currently inhabits, then the orders of other superiors. If the champion disobeys one to obey something more important, no penalty accrues. Thus, if the championís king tells it to attack the evil baronís soldiers, the champion will do so. If the championís king tells it to murder an annoying noble, the champion will refuse. Likewise, more major laws take precedence over minor ones. Lawful champions never have conflicts of interest; they have a strict hierarchy of obedience and sustain no penalties for choosing the greater rule.

Lawful champions do pressure their allies into obeying the laws. Though they donít play judge and jury, a lawful champion is required to report any major infractions to proper authorities. Minor infractions need not be reported, but are generally worth a stern reprimand nonetheless. The champion is allowed to speak on its alliesí behalf and explain mitigating circumstances in making the report.

Chaos: Champions of chaos are all about free will. A champion of chaos is prohibited from allowing another to direct its actions.

This is not to say that the champion refuses to take advice or follow group strategies, but it will not do so simply because it is told to do so (and if circumstances indicate a better option, it wonít hesitate to take itÖpossibly without warning). If it doesnít personally desire to do something, it wonít. The chaotic champion is also prohibited from accepting authority. No one has authority over the champion, regardless of power, social standing, age, or merit. The chaotic champion treats a king, an elder, or an archmage no differently than anyone else.

The chaotic champion is likewise prohibited from forcing others to do as it wishes. It can advise, suggest, even threaten, but it cannot force, especially with magic. It may deceive people into taking such actions, however. The chaotic champion may also offer an ultimatum; the champion denies authority, but it does not deny cause and effect. The champion does not pretend that choices come without consequences.

If the champion is magically forced to obey an order (before it receives its immunities, that is) it sustains no penalty.

The champion refuses any form of imprisonment. If given a choice between imprisonment and death, it would sooner die (not to say that it will commit suicide if imprisonedóit will try to escapeóbut it wonít accept imprisonment over death). Likewise, it never accepts spells that constrain its actions. The champion will not accept a zone of truth spell, for example (although it might be open to not resisting a discern lies spell, since that spell only detects whether or not it is lying rather than forcing it to tell the truth).

Finally, the chaotic champion never makes promises or otherwise indicates that it will take a certain action. It might mention that that sounds like a good idea and that yes, it probably will do so, but the champion does not give assurances and does not pretend to know what it will do when the time comes to act.

Neutrality: A champion of neutrality cannot take actions that would gravely upset a balance. For example, if a powerful necromancer is locked in a war against a mighty force of paladins, the champion canít help fight the necromancer (or the paladins, for that matter). On the flip side, if the necromancer has taken over the region and cast it into darkness and despair, then the champion can fight it (it would be restoring balance where evil is currently dominant).

Champions of neutrality donít generally have to concern themselves with balance on a grand scale. It can be assumed that if a great imbalance for evil is stopped an equivalent imbalance for good is probably stopped somewhere else. Champions of neutrality preserve immediate balances.


Ex-champions: A champion whose alignment no longer consists of its dedication loses all of its class features except for mettle (it retains skills, stats, and proficiencies). The character is considered an un-dedicated champion.

An un-dedicated champion still possesses the spiritual strength to engender magic; it just needs a cause to dedicate itself to. The un-dedicated champion may dedicate itself to a new alignment (it must be a component of its current alignment) by receiving an Atonement spell from a cleric of that alignment. This simply gives the champion a supernatural nudge into the new alignment; no XP is required on the clericís part. Alternately, a champion who steadfastly serves its new alignment for a year may rededicate itself without the spell.

A dedicated champion may also change dedications to the other component of its alignment. This likewise requires an atonement spell, but it is much harder to change the current dedication to the new one. The cleric must spend XP, and usually charges the champion with a quest to prove its intent.

Champions are not restricted in multiclassing and cannot permanently lose their powers (although champions who keep changing or losing dedications may find it hard to convince a cleric to give it the Atonement spell).