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ImNotTrevor
2015-12-14, 03:35 PM
Yo. I'm working on a few projects and for one of them I want to see how much Kids can follow a tabletop RPG without getting seriously bored.

Anyone have a system they'd recommend for 7-10 year olds? I would be running it, and it's primarily to see if they would even be interested in the concept. So as simple as possible would be best. And yes, I am considering RISUS.

Any others I should look into?

JNAProductions
2015-12-14, 03:44 PM
I've never played Toon. But that being said... Toon?

AMFV
2015-12-14, 03:44 PM
It depends on your kids to be honest. My first was MERP (which in retrospect may not have been the best choice). There are a lot of games that have simplified stuff for kiddies. What sort of things are your kids into? What sort of shows do they watch?

Mark Hall
2015-12-14, 03:54 PM
As others have said, it depends on the kids.

Third Eye Games has one called Mermaid Adventures (http://thirdeyegames.net/mermaid-adventures/) that Eloy wrote to play with his kids.

Troll Lord, of Castles and Crusades fame, also has Harvesters (https://www.trolllord.com/tlgstore/#!/Harvesters-the-Role-Playing-Game/p/45154178/category=11639159), somewhat in the vein of Brian Jacques Redwall books.

I have played Castles and Crusades with kids as young as 8. Once they get the basic idea ("Roll a d20, and get as high as possible."), they get into the game, and enjoy telling the story.

ImNotTrevor
2015-12-14, 04:00 PM
It depends on your kids to be honest. My first was MERP (which in retrospect may not have been the best choice). There are a lot of games that have simplified stuff for kiddies. What sort of things are your kids into? What sort of shows do they watch?

The kids are into a pretty wide variety of disparate things, but they all have wild imaginations and enjoy imagination-based play or I wouldn't even attempt this experiment.

As for what is on the table:
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Jurassic World
MLP
I have one neice who is morbid enough that I see her one day being a necromancer, absolutely. She's 7. Also the MLP fan.
I have weird neices and nephews.

Of course, stories about princesses and knights and dragons are also much enjoyed, and general kids stuff is usually a hit.

I'll start looking into the suggestions I have already. Thanks to everyone who has offered an idea!

JNAProductions
2015-12-14, 04:02 PM
Isn't there a Pathinder derivative all about Ponies? Check that out. (And pre-gen characters, because otherwise it'll be confusing as heck.)

AMFV
2015-12-14, 04:07 PM
The kids are into a pretty wide variety of disparate things, but they all have wild imaginations and enjoy imagination-based play or I wouldn't even attempt this experiment.

As for what is on the table:
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Jurassic World
MLP
I have one neice who is morbid enough that I see her one day being a necromancer, absolutely. She's 7. Also the MLP fan.
I have weird neices and nephews.

Of course, stories about princesses and knights and dragons are also much enjoyed, and general kids stuff is usually a hit.

I'll start looking into the suggestions I have already. Thanks to everyone who has offered an idea!

Blue Rose is fairly good for that (I personally loathe the setting, but it is fairly kid friendly). There's an MLP game, as people have said. Palladium made both a Jurrasicy one and a TMNT game if I recall, but those are Palladium and may have a rough learning curve (they may also be completely out of print, since it I haven't looked at them in several years).

You might also try something universal... Like Mutants and Masterminds or GURPS, so that way you can combine fantasy worlds. Kids tend to be huge fans of mashups, and with a universal system you could theoretically work in multiple things they're into.

Mark Hall
2015-12-14, 04:36 PM
Palladium made both a Jurrasicy one and a TMNT game if I recall, but those are Palladium and may have a rough learning curve (they may also be completely out of print, since it I haven't looked at them in several years).


Palladium had the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles license ages ago, putting out Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles & Other Strangeness, in a couple different revisions. That went on to form the core of their non-licensed game After the Bomb, which was originally a post-apocalyptic setting for TMNT. They also had Transdimensional Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, which included rules for mutant dinosaurs and the like.

Both the TMNT books are out of print, the license long gone. After the Bomb might still be available some places... note that, if you're looking for the full RPG, you want the one with the greyish cover of an elephant throwing a giant robot, not the orangish-reddish cover of a man in armor shooting a mutant bird... the orange-red one is the supplement to TMNT, not a stand-alone game.

And, as with AMFV, I wouldn't heavily suggest them. While they have some good ideas and can be played light, character creation is a little intensive and that can turn folks off.

Frozen_Feet
2015-12-14, 05:06 PM
Finland has Astraterra and Myrskyn Sankarit. The latter is available in English as Age of the Tempest. They're both targeted specifically to kids and beginning players. I don't know a whole lot of Astraterra (it's sort of a dreamy sci-fi game) but I've heard good things about it. Age of Tempest is a pretty simple d20 game in a basic fantasy setting, spiritually similar to BECMI.

Knaight
2015-12-14, 08:21 PM
I've successfully run a few Fudge games for kids, mostly because it's my go to system and works well in general. If you want something D&Dish, try Warrior Rogue and Mage.

AMFV
2015-12-15, 09:19 AM
I've successfully run a few Fudge games for kids, mostly because it's my go to system and works well in general. If you want something D&Dish, try Warrior Rogue and Mage.

I still say a universal system would be best since kids love mashups. But if you are set on a D&D thing I second the vote for something retrocloney.

ImNotTrevor
2015-12-15, 10:13 AM
I could do that, yeah. I just don't want character creation to take too long. Kids + tasks that require long periods of concentration = (usually) a bad time.

But I may try FUDGE or FATE accelerated. Also thinking of just brewing something fast and easy. But I'll keep looking.

AMFV
2015-12-15, 11:47 AM
I could do that, yeah. I just don't want character creation to take too long. Kids + tasks that require long periods of concentration = (usually) a bad time.

But I may try FUDGE or FATE accelerated. Also thinking of just brewing something fast and easy. But I'll keep looking.

One good option for kids is to pre-build characters. The character creation is pretty involved, and kids aren't likely to be picky enough that it'll matter too much (again depending on your kids). If I'm playing with younger folks that tends to be my strategy.

wumpus
2015-12-15, 12:05 PM
Does anybody have a link to teddy bear heroes (created on this site). I wouldn't use it for 7-10, but it jumped to mind.

The one thing I thought it needed was to make the PCs [a specific child's] teddy bear (change to whatever said child is bonded to), and let them control other toys [belonging to "their" child] as NPCs. This lets the teddy bear have pretty much all the available powers without overshadowing other players.

Knaight
2015-12-15, 01:08 PM
I still say a universal system would be best since kids love mashups. But if you are set on a D&D thing I second the vote for something retrocloney.

I don't disagree, and there's a reason I went with Fudge for that. It's universal, it's rules light, and I've successfully used it for the sorts of bizarre off the wall stuff that even GURPS struggles with.

nyjastul69
2015-12-15, 01:49 PM
You might want to check out Mouse Guard (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mouse_Guard_Roleplaying_Game).

Socratov
2015-12-15, 03:18 PM
I heard good things about Dread. it work by roleplay, making choices and jenga. The time it was on table top it was really fun and engaging.

Airk
2015-12-15, 05:29 PM
I heard good things about Dread. it work by roleplay, making choices and jenga. The time it was on table top it was really fun and engaging.

Apparently, the creator of Dread also did Dread House (https://dig1000holes.wordpress.com/dreadhouse/) which is a relative, but designed for kids?

dps
2015-12-15, 10:29 PM
I could do that, yeah. I just don't want character creation to take too long. Kids + tasks that require long periods of concentration = (usually) a bad time.


Go with 1st edition DnD. Roll 3D6 six times in order for your traits. Doesn't get much simpler.

dramatic flare
2015-12-16, 02:55 AM
Having done so, successfully, I could recommend Paranoia. Specifically, "zap" paranoia where it's all anout screwing your buddy over and not about the intrigue.
"Okay. None of you are the same team. You're your own team. Steal the realfood cookies from the cookie jar. don't get caught."

Aik
2015-12-16, 05:07 AM
Shadows: http://mozai.com/writing/not_mine/shadows.html
Super simple, but a really good system that helps the story build on itself. If you can, try and make sure there are at least three players so that token bidding wars happen.

ImNotTrevor
2015-12-16, 09:04 AM
Shadows is absolutely fascinating and I think I will try it, definitely.

Yuki Akuma
2015-12-16, 09:11 AM
Witch Girl Adventures (http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/62504/Witch-Girls-Adventure-Rule-book) is meant to be for kids.

Kids probably won't even notice how ****ed up the default setting is!

8BitNinja
2015-12-16, 01:42 PM
I say just use an older version of D&D like AD&D and simplify terms

for example, when you encounter a kobold, call him a lizard man, I know there is already that, but they will understand more

For the classes Cleric, Monk, Ranger, and Paladin, change the names to something they will understand such as Priest, Black Belt or Karate Master, Hunter, and Knight

Make your own campaign, something like, "go save Princess Sara from the evil wizard Generic Badguy for King Steve and Queen Jane, and fight his army of monsters while your at it, but while you prepare to leave, left hand man Gary tells you that Rodney the coffee stain told him that only a magical holy sword can kill him"

So their quest begins

Also, keep human enemies to a minimum, killing a slime is fun, but they may not want to end the life of a bandit, even if he is evil

AMFV
2015-12-16, 06:05 PM
I say just use an older version of D&D like AD&D and simplify terms

for example, when you encounter a kobold, call him a lizard man, I know there is already that, but they will understand more


Point of Order, in older editions of D&D Kobolds are dog men, not lizard men.

8BitNinja
2015-12-17, 09:46 AM
Point of Order, in older editions of D&D Kobolds are dog men, not lizard men.

I'm sorry, I have not read the older monster manuals

Vichaous
2015-12-17, 10:03 AM
I found that First Fable is pretty simple, and I believe free in DriveThrough as a bundle. I can't link yet, but just google First Fable and look for the bundle in DTRPG. Might be worth checking out as it's designed for kids in that age range.

JAL_1138
2015-12-17, 11:15 AM
Moldvay Basic (B/X) or Red Box Mentzer Basic (BECMI). The all-time classics for "first TRPG."

Or heck, 5e. I've seen a few 8-12 year-olds do pretty well with it in Adventurers' League.

YossarianLives
2015-12-17, 06:01 PM
Also, keep human enemies to a minimum, killing a slime is fun, but they may not want to end the life of a bandit, even if he is evil
This shouldn't be necessary. Most kids have no qualms about killing people. Give most kids a 'sword' and tell them they can do whatever they want and watch them go on a murderous spree. Kids can be scary, I think it's a result of not yet fully understanding what a human life is really worth.

8BitNinja
2015-12-17, 06:05 PM
This shouldn't be necessary. Most kids have no qualms about killing people. Give most kids a 'sword' and tell them they can do whatever they want and watch them go on a murderous spree. Kids can be scary, I think it's a result of not yet fully understanding what a human life is really worth.

Well then, just ignore that last note

goto124
2015-12-18, 12:55 AM
Non-human enemies provide a lot more creative space though. Would a child rather fight a human bandit, or a dire half-dragon catsnake?

Yes, that kind of creative space.

YossarianLives
2015-12-18, 01:16 AM
Non-human enemies provide a lot more creative space though. Would a child rather fight a human bandit, or a dire half-dragon catsnake?
This is very true.

Mutazoia
2015-12-18, 04:15 AM
Well my go-to games to recommend in this instance would be Star Wars D6 and possibly (if you can find i) Amber Diceless (which has since become Lords of Gossamer and Shadow).

Star Wars D6 because it's quick and easy to learn, plays pretty fast, characters can be generated in a matter of minutes (or seconds using the templates in the back) and STAR WARS. Tell a kid he can be a Jedi and watch him start playing with his air-lightsaber.

Amber because...well there are very few rules to learn. It's based on the Amber novels by Roger Zalazney. If you can think of it, you can pretty much do it... It's a bit more work for the GM since new gamers tend to get a little power-drunk with how free form the game can get...you can travel between dimensions (called Shadows) at will, and you can find pretty much anything or anyplace in shadow. Want to find a world where you are worshiped like a God? Done. Want to find a crazy world where up is down and down is blue? Done. Basically it's heaver on the story telling aspect of RPGs than the mechanics of RPGs

8BitNinja
2015-12-18, 09:48 AM
I tested mine on 3rd graders here (http://fogstudios.weebly.com/games.html)

Don't worry, it's free, but you might want to make rule changes, it's not finished entirely and needs polishing

JAL_1138
2015-12-18, 10:37 AM
Well my go-to games to recommend in this instance would be Star Wars D6 and possibly (if you can find i) Amber Diceless (which has since become Lords of Gossamer and Shadow).

Star Wars D6 because it's quick and easy to learn, plays pretty fast, characters can be generated in a matter of minutes (or seconds using the templates in the back) and STAR WARS. Tell a kid he can be a Jedi and watch him start playing with his air-lightsaber.

Amber because...well there are very few rules to learn. It's based on the Amber novels by Roger Zalazney. If you can think of it, you can pretty much do it... It's a bit more work for the GM since new gamers tend to get a little power-drunk with how free form the game can get...you can travel between dimensions (called Shadows) at will, and you can find pretty much anything or anyplace in shadow. Want to find a world where you are worshiped like a God? Done. Want to find a crazy world where up is down and down is blue? Done. Basically it's heaver on the story telling aspect of RPGs than the mechanics of RPGs

Seconding WEG D6 Star Wars, though it's out of print and tricky to find these days. Best Star Wars TRPG ever, and some amazingly high-quality splatbooks. The setting info WEG came up with for the splats was so good that allegedly Lucasarts sent Timothy Zahn copies to work from when writing the Thrawn novels.

8BitNinja
2015-12-18, 10:57 AM
Kids playing Star Wars D6 will be like

DM: alright, so you get on to your ship, and walking towards it is Darth Vader
Kid 1: Turn this thing around, we're going to blow him out of the water
DM: Okay, so you turn it around, what do you do now?
Kid 2: Fire all the cannons
DM: Roll to hit
Kid 2: (Rolls) Critical miss
DM: Darth Vader deflects the cannonfire with his lightsaber, your ship takes (rolls) you don't need to know, you all died

8BitNinja
2015-12-18, 11:00 AM
There have been three comments on my first suggestion, no one mentioned the reference I made

If you tell thi board, I will give you 1d8 imaginary currency of your country

JAL_1138
2015-12-18, 11:07 AM
Kids playing Star Wars D6 will be like

DM: alright, so you get on to your ship, and walking towards it is Darth Vader
Kid 1: Turn this thing around, we're going to blow him out of the water
DM: Okay, so you turn it around, what do you do now?
Kid 2: Fire all the cannons
DM: Roll to hit
Kid 2: (Rolls) Critical miss
DM: Darth Vader deflects the cannonfire with his lightsaber, your ship takes (rolls) you don't need to know, you all died


To be fair, that's also exactly what happens when adults play it.

(Although, can you deflect vehicle-scale cannons with a lightsaber? I can't remember. Probably. Jedi could get OP as heck in it. Then again, depending on edition, a minmaxed Wookie could become virtually lightsaber-proof too...)

8BitNinja
2015-12-18, 11:11 AM
To be fair, that's also exactly what happens when adults play it.

(Although, can you deflect vehicle-scale cannons with a lightsaber? I can't remember. Probably. Jedi could get OP as heck in it. Then again, depending on edition, a minmaxed Wookie could become virtually lightsaber-proof too...)

This is a tabletop game, crazy things happen

and it's balls-off-the-wall insane when my little brother DMs

I gotta post some stories about that

Knaight
2015-12-18, 11:12 AM
Seconding WEG D6 Star Wars, though it's out of print and tricky to find these days. Best Star Wars TRPG ever, and some amazingly high-quality splatbooks. The setting info WEG came up with for the splats was so good that allegedly Lucasarts sent Timothy Zahn copies to work from when writing the Thrawn novels.

While d6 Star Wars is hard to get ahold of, WEG released a more generic set for free on DriveThru RPG. It includes d6 Fantasy, d6 Adventure, and the critical d6 Space. That last one can pretty much cover Star Wars, though you might need to dip into d6 Fantasy for rules for the force.

8BitNinja
2015-12-18, 11:18 AM
though you might need to dip into d6 Fantasy for rules for the force.

What are you talking about, the Force is hard science, a wasted guy stumbling out of a bar told me that

ZamielVanWeber
2015-12-18, 11:20 AM
If you gen the characters Mutants and Masterminds is not too rules heavy, uses only one die, and lets kids be super heroes running around fighting evil.

8BitNinja
2015-12-18, 11:25 AM
Bunnies and Burrows

I dare you

JAL_1138
2015-12-18, 11:26 AM
While d6 Star Wars is hard to get ahold of, WEG released a more generic set for free on DriveThru RPG. It includes d6 Fantasy, d6 Adventure, and the critical d6 Space. That last one can pretty much cover Star Wars, though you might need to dip into d6 Fantasy for rules for the force.

The system itself is good, simple, and quick to learn, but the big draw of WEG D6 SW, at least for me, is the absolutely phenomenal setting material. When I was a Star-Wars-obsessed kid, the splatbooks were like the greatest things ever. They fleshed-out so much detail to the universe I loved; filled in so many blank spaces of the map, so to speak, with interesting stuff.

(Definitely going to be picking up the generic versions, though--even bereft of the SW setting stuff, I've been looking for some D&D alternatives that aren't as crunchtastic as GURPS but more focused than FATE. Thanks for telling me about them!)

8BitNinja
2015-12-18, 11:28 AM
FATAL

They'll love that one :smallbiggrin:

goto124
2015-12-18, 11:56 AM
Might want to color that text blue.

AMFV
2015-12-18, 12:04 PM
Might want to color that text blue.

I'm still not overfond of that convention. Sarcasm shouldn't have to explicitly identified as such.

Fri
2015-12-18, 12:24 PM
I find old school hack (http://www.oldschoolhack.net/) to be a perfect combination of rules and making things up, crunch and simplicity. Perfect for roping new players, kids or otherwise. Basically, there's enough rules there so people who like playing crpg/wargames can still think things up, but also simple enough to be taught to everyone in one hour, and permissive for all kind of shenanigans new players and kids would like to do.

JeenLeen
2015-12-18, 02:32 PM
As others have said, it depends on the kids.

Third Eye Games has one called Mermaid Adventures (http://thirdeyegames.net/mermaid-adventures/) that Eloy wrote to play with his kids.

I can put in a vote for Mermaid Adventures. I bought the book (though I haven't played it yet), and I can see it as fun for adults and children. The system is pretty straightforward, so players could make their own characters pretty easily if they want to or it wouldn't be hard for an adult to make one based on the player's preferences. The dice rolls are pretty straightforward, and it's possible to do well without much thought in char-gen. Magic is fun with some variety without being overcomplicated. You can make overpowered characters, but it takes some thought to do so, so that's not a likely risk unless players do it intentionally.

If you look up Game Geek Mermaid Adventures, you should be able to find a decent review of the system.

(I considered running it for my current friends, as a darker setting where the mermaid kingdoms have been destroyed or something like that.)

Florian
2015-12-18, 02:49 PM
Any others I should look into?

There´s an english translation of the Japanese TTRPG "Ryuutama: Natural fantasy RPG".
Last summer was perfect for BBQ, so I often had friends and their kids over at my house and we played that a lot with some 5 to 6 year olds. The game is a bit formal and the steps leading up to an "adventure" repeat themselves, but that was exactly what the kids were having fun with, as they learned something and showed of with it. I can absolutely recommend it.

If you are fluent in german, take a look at the "John Sinclair" RPG. That will be fine with kids in elementary school and being able to read simple sentences. Every scene of the campaign comes with some "action cards" that you place on the table, each having a very simple description at the front, like "Topple the pillars", "Hose the mummies with a flamethrower" and detailed description for the gm at the back.

YossarianLives
2015-12-18, 03:06 PM
I tested mine on 3rd graders here (http://fogstudios.weebly.com/games.html)

Don't worry, it's free, but you might want to make rule changes, it's not finished entirely and needs polishing
How did it go? I've only had one experience playing with people that young, but it went fairly well for me.

8BitNinja
2015-12-18, 04:39 PM
How did it go? I've only had one experience playing with people that young, but it went fairly well for me.

It was great, but characters were mostly just empty shells

Mr.Moron
2015-12-18, 04:47 PM
This shouldn't be necessary. Most kids have no qualms about killing people. Give most kids a 'sword' and tell them they can do whatever they want and watch them go on a murderous spree. Kids can be scary, I think it's a result of not yet fully understanding what a human life is really worth.

I sometimes I enjoy doing relatively free-form RP stuff to pass time with my little cousins or other kids I wind up spending time with. No rules, no set list of abilities/powers. I basically just ask them "What if scenarios" they can just do pretty much whatever they want and I move the story along. One time a little girl about (5 or 6 I think, maybe a bit older) dealt with a conflict by declaring "I shove his face in the blender". Keeping in mind this was unprompted with no kitchen appliances having been established in the immediate area. Her character was apparently just lugging around a giant blender in case anyone's face needed juicing.


EDIT: Which I'll put forward "Free Form" or relatively free form as good system for little kids. No need for a ton of rules just ask and respond. If you want some kind of objective resolution system a single die or deck of cards and just tell them "OK. If you get this you succeed, and if you get this you fail and this is what happens". I've found when I've tried to do systems with rules with kids (under 10 anyway) they just get frustrated when the system puts limitations on them.

ScrivenerofDoom
2015-12-19, 06:44 AM
I've successfully run 3.xE for 7-year olds. As long as there is an inherent logic in the rules - roll high - then the rest is just make believe.

By contrast...


Go with 1st edition DnD. Roll 3D6 six times in order for your traits. Doesn't get much simpler.

Gygaxian D&D with its disassociated mechanics and just bad rules design really isn't what I would use for kids. It's fine for those of us who may sometimes wax nostalgic for the 80s but I wouldn't start anyone there now that I have options that make a lot more sense as written.

5E would be a much better choice.

JustSomeGuy
2015-12-19, 07:25 PM
On childrens' imagination:

They come up with some pure outlandish b.s, but very quickly lose where they are in the process. Example - my 4 year old daughter was being mardy with me and wanted to run away to zombie mountain. With a few short questions, and a dopey kid voice,i managed to snag invites for me and the rest of the family too. Occured a while back, but you rarely catch randomness on this scale on film and this one i caught on film:

http://youtu.be/9R7DD9NtJ-g

While today at the park, her (now 5), and her 4 year old brother and 8 year old sister had began a game of 'diamond quest' (which began as some sort of hide the thing and the others have to find it). Cut 5 minutes in, there was a flying pirate laser ship, jail, a mean crocodile and you got lightning death if you 'did the wrong buttons' (?).


On a similar subject, has anyone played the lego rpg? Seems ok but we have playmobils and mega blocks, so getting a bunch of lego would be something of an investment just to try out a game we don't know. As an aside, a few playmobils and a box of carcasonne can kill hours of spontaneous made-up kingdoms/storytelling, assuming you have enough princesses/fairies/fairy princesses, horses/swans/motorbikes. Also dinosaurs and robots. And anything else you can scoop out their toyboxes.

Cluedrew
2015-12-19, 08:07 PM
This shouldn't be necessary. Most kids have no qualms about killing people. Give most kids a 'sword' and tell them they can do whatever they want and watch them go on a murderous spree. Kids can be scary, I think it's a result of not yet fully understanding what a human life is really worth.Actually, I think that makes it even more necessary as we go to get the message across to them. "In the ways of hate they must be carefully taught" is not a good way to... approach anything really.

Kids will general assume whatever the adults around them do is "right" so... be a good role model I guess.

Mutazoia
2015-12-20, 02:57 PM
While d6 Star Wars is hard to get ahold of, WEG released a more generic set for free on DriveThru RPG. It includes d6 Fantasy, d6 Adventure, and the critical d6 Space. That last one can pretty much cover Star Wars, though you might need to dip into d6 Fantasy for rules for the force.

Actually, there is a lot of material archived on D6holocron.com...all the core and a bunch of the splats....

8BitNinja
2015-12-21, 11:00 PM
South Park, the TRPG

Good role model material

veti
2015-12-21, 11:10 PM
One time a little girl about (5 or 6 I think, maybe a bit older) dealt with a conflict by declaring "I shove his face in the blender". Keeping in mind this was unprompted with no kitchen appliances having been established in the immediate area. Her character was apparently just lugging around a giant blender in case anyone's face needed juicing.

If I recall correctly - Toon actively encourages that style of play.

Jayabalard
2015-12-23, 01:25 AM
I started my kids off with munchkin (the card game, not the RPG). That gives them a bit of an introduction to some rpg concepts, even if it's in the form of parody. I'm hoping to get them interested in some other games in the near future.


Both the TMNT books are out of print, the license long gone. After the Bomb might still be available some places... note that, if you're looking for the full RPG, you want the one with the greyish cover of an elephant throwing a giant robot, not the orangish-reddish cover of a man in armor shooting a mutant bird... the orange-red one is the supplement to TMNT, not a stand-alone game.

Oddly enough, I was looking around on ebay for a copy a few weeks ago, and it looks like it might not be too hard to pick up a copy.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Teenage-Mutant-Ninja-Turtles-and-Other-Strangeness-by-Erick-Wujcik-1985-/251646999750

Arbane
2015-12-27, 06:59 PM
I'm still not overfond of that convention. Sarcasm shouldn't have to explicitly identified as such.

The problem is that this is The Internet, where there is NOTHING so insane, idiotic, or evil that SOMEONE won't say it dead seriously.

As for recommendations.... Costume Fairy Adventures, maybe? Or ooooold Basic D&D, if you can find a TOTALLY LEGAL copy. (That's what got me hooked, way back when.) Or maybe Dungeon World?

Edit to add:


I sometimes I enjoy doing relatively free-form RP stuff to pass time with my little cousins or other kids I wind up spending time with. No rules, no set list of abilities/powers. I basically just ask them "What if scenarios" they can just do pretty much whatever they want and I move the story along. One time a little girl about (5 or 6 I think, maybe a bit older) dealt with a conflict by declaring "I shove his face in the blender". Keeping in mind this was unprompted with no kitchen appliances having been established in the immediate area. Her character was apparently just lugging around a giant blender in case anyone's face needed juicing.


EDIT: Which I'll put forward "Free Form" or relatively free form as good system for little kids. No need for a ton of rules just ask and respond. If you want some kind of objective resolution system a single die or deck of cards and just tell them "OK. If you get this you succeed, and if you get this you fail and this is what happens". I've found when I've tried to do systems with rules with kids (under 10 anyway) they just get frustrated when the system puts limitations on them.

This is also good advice. No point weighing them down with a lot of rules just yet....

Yuki Akuma
2015-12-27, 11:05 PM
Or ooooold Basic D&D, if you can find a TOTALLY LEGAL copy. (That's what got me hooked, way back when.)

This is, in fact, fairly easy - Basic D&D retroclones are pretty common. Here's one! (http://www.gratisgames.webspace.virginmedia.com/darkdungeons.html)* Turns out you can't copyright game mechanics!

(If you could, no other games would be allowed to have 'hit points'.)

You can patent them, but that's different, and costs money TSR didn't really have at the time. It also runs out in 14 years, so it would have expired in 1991 regardless.

* This is probably the best one, honestly, as instead of reimagining the game as a toolkit RPG or whatever it basically ports the Rules Cyclopedia (and a bit of Immortals I believe) wholesale. It even includes the basic metaphysics of the Mystara setting, with a bit of Spelljammer for flair.

Mark Hall
2015-12-29, 04:18 PM
I'll also chime in about kids and killing...

I ran a 3.0 game for a kid back in 2000 or so. His response when confronted with a kobold in a barn was to make friends with it. While I don't have a problem with adults killing things as much as they like in a game, with kids I would want to emphasize that there were other solutions, and let the non-killing solutions they come up with have a good chance to work.

AMFV
2015-12-29, 05:12 PM
I'll also chime in about kids and killing...

I ran a 3.0 game for a kid back in 2000 or so. His response when confronted with a kobold in a barn was to make friends with it. While I don't have a problem with adults killing things as much as they like in a game, with kids I would want to emphasize that there were other solutions, and let the non-killing solutions they come up with have a good chance to work.

That's definitely a way to do it. I might not want to err too much in that direction. If you're using the game to teach about morality, then you should have the opposite, situations where sometimes things have to be settled in the unpleasant way. That would be an older kid lesson, but one that I believe to be equally important.

I think that it's important to teach children both that violence is wrong when it is not necessary, and that it is sometimes sadly necessary. Although games may not always be the best avenue for that, it's certainly an interesting one to try.