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    Mar 2013

    Default Re: D&D 5e Base Class Contest IX: It's Time for Time

    SERVANTS OF FATE

    The deities of Destiny, Fate and Time do not see the world the way mortals, or even other deities, do. They have their own perception of the world: what it was, what it is, and what it will be. Their divine role is to see to it those three things line up as they should.

    To that end, rather than sponsoring clerics or paladins, some of these deities instead call upon those who pray to them for guidance in a seemingly unpredictable and random world. Those who are dedicated enough to be trusted are granted the ability to nudge, bend, or even break time, when necessary, to force events into place.

    These are the Servants of Fate.

    Class Features

    Hit Points: 1d8 + Con per level

    Proficiencies: Wisdom Saving Throws, Light and Medium Armor, Simple Weapons, all Crossbows, the Gaming Set of the player’s choice, and any two Skills from Perception, Religion, and the skills listed in their Timeline.

    Level Prof Bonus Features Flux Minor Moderate Major
    1 2 Timeline (Archetype) 2 1
    2 2 3 1
    3 2 Twist of Fate (3rd) 3 2
    4 2 Abil. Score 3 2
    5 3 3 2 1
    6 3 Twist of Fate (6th) 3 2 1
    7 3 Timeline Feature (7th) 4 2 1
    8 3 Abil. Score 4 3 1
    9 4 4 3 2
    10 4 Twist of Fate (10th) 4 3 2
    11 4 4 3 2 1
    12 4 Abil. Score 4 3 2 1
    13 5 Timeline Feature (13th) 4 3 3 1
    14 5 Twist of Fate (14th) 4 3 3 1
    15 5 4 3 3 2
    16 5 Abil. Score 4 3 3 2
    17 6 5 3 3 2
    18 6 Timeline Feature (18th) 5 3 3 2
    19 6 Abil. Score 5 3 3 3
    20 6 Chosen By Destiny 5 3 3 3

    Flux
    Flux is the resource Servants of Fate use for their various abilities. They recover all their spent Flux during a long rest, and 1 spent Flux during a short rest.

    Timeline
    At 1st level, a Servant of Fate chooses their Archetype: Warden of the Past, Bearer of the Present, or Guardian of the Future.

    Spoiler: Wardens of the Past
    Show

    Wardens of the Past have limited ability to recall the past, frequently to reverse mistakes. They are Proficient in Intelligence saving throws, and their list of skills they can be Proficient in includes History, Survival, and Investigation. Wardens of the Past may also “recall” any spell on a scroll, effectively casting it, at the cost of 1 Flux per level of the scroll’s spell. This ability does not, however, let them identify which spell a scroll has.

    Glimpse of Creation: At 7th level, a Warden of the Past may spend one minute concentrating on an item they hold to look at during the time in which it was created. They can see, hear, and smell as if they were standing near the item when it was made, giving them visions of the creators and the place in which it was created, as well as the steps by which the item was put together. In addition to knowing the materials/parts used (therefore instantly identifying a forgery in almost all circumstances), it functions as the identify spell.

    Memory within a Memory: At 13th level, a Warden of the Past can constantly keep their memories of a few seconds ago in a kind of special Capacity-like storage. Upon a sudden mental shock, these memories are released, effectively replacing the last few seconds the Warden of the Past has experienced. As a Reaction, they may spend 1 Flux to instantly end any effect that causes them to be frightened, charmed, or stunned when the effect is applied to them. Alternatively, they may use their Reaction and spend 1 Flux to gain Resistance to the psychic damage of a single attack.

    Echoes of the Infinite: At 18th level, a Warden of the Past may draw upon the latent temporal energy around them. This instantly restores 3 spent Flux, and it is not an Action. Once this ability is used, the temporal energy the Warden of the Past can draw upon is exhausted, and this ability may not be used again for a week.


    Spoiler: Bearers of the Present
    Show

    Bearers of the Present have the ability to move things in and out of time, storing items or even people. They are Proficient in Charisma saving throws, all spell foci, and their list of skills they can be Proficient in includes Persuasion, Medicine, and Sleight of Hand. Further, they may attune themselves to any class-restricted magic item with stored spells that uses charges, such as a wand, as if they were a cleric or sorcerer.

    Witching Wardrobe: At 7th level, a Bearer of the Present may store a "replacement outfit" away in time, which does not require any Capacity. As a Bonus Action, they may store any or all of their currently-worn armor, clothing and jewelry away in time. Or, also as a Bonus Action, they may return these items to their body, replacing any or all of the items currently being worn in the appropriate slots (if any are there). This cannot be used to store containers such as backpacks, and items carried in stored armor/clothing (in pockets for example) are either placed in the replacement's pockets, or faiing that, dumped on the ground. Weapons and shields aren't stored this way.

    This action takes 1 Flux if anything being either stored or returned is enchanted, otherwise it takes no Flux.

    Tardy Booth: At 13th level, a Bearer of the Present may store a special building-like container, made of carefully-constructed metal and glass costing 5,000 gold to construct. The container is five feet square at the base, eight feet tall, and is basically a small hut with a lockless door.

    Once created, the Bearer of the Present may store the container away in time if it is within 30 feet, or retrieve it from time to any unoccupied level ground within 30 feet. This takes ten minutes of concentration, but does not require any Flux and does not count against Capacity.

    The container may store up to six hundred pounds of nonliving items and up to ten nonsentient creatures of Tiny size or smaller.

    Being mostly glass, the container is susceptible to damage. If significantly damaged, it must be repaired (costing at least 500 gold) before it can be stored again. However, the container reacts to object restoration as if it weighed one pound, making it easy for a Servant of Fate to fix.

    Incarnation: At 18th level, a Bearer of the Present can, over the course of one month, unconsciously and slowly store tiny pieces of their body into a special storage, which does not use any Capacity. When their physical body suffers a sudden shock, the Bearer of the Present can, even unconsciously, replace damaged or modified body parts, taking about a second.

    By spending 1 Flux, the Bearer of the Present may choose to instantly undo the effect of any one attack -- even an attack that knocks them unconscious or kills them -- as long as the attack
    a) causes bludgeoning, piercing, slashing, fire, cold, lightning, radiant, acid, thunder and/or poison damage
    b) causes the petrified, poisoned, blinded, deafened, paralyzed, unconscious and/or death conditions
    c) any special effect that specifically affects the body that the DM allows (such as having a hand cut off or blood drained)
    d) any mix of the above.

    Of note, attacks that affect the mind or soul, including psychic and necrotic damage, can't be reversed with Incarnation, neither is forced movement.

    Technically, the Bearer of the Present is affected by the attack, if that matters. They just recover very quickly. So if, for example, the attacker has an ability that is triggered by reducing a victim to 0 hit points, they can still use it even if the Servant of Fate is still standing afterwards.

    Once used, the Bearer of the Present begins slowly storing itself again, and this ability cannot be used for another month.


    Spoiler: Guardians of the Future
    Show

    Guardians of the Future have the limited ability to see a split-second into the future, effectively allowing them to act in combat with greater grace and skill. They are Proficient in Dexterity saving throws, melee Martial weapons which aren’t Heavy, and their list of skills they can be Proficient in includes Athletics, Stealth, and Insight.

    Plan Ahead: Starting at 7th level, the Guardian of the Future's ability to see into the future can manifest as a kind of deja vu when they see an otherwise normal item. The player may retroactively add a small item (no more than one pound) to their character sheet, as the character suddenly remembers they brought it with them. The item must fit one of two categories:
    a) the item must have been available for purchase in the last city, town or village the character visited. The character may retroactively purchase the item as if they had done so when they originally had the opportunity.
    b) the item must be one the character or party already has, but did not bring with them.

    As the Guardian of the Future is basically saying "I had it the whole time" certain situations -- such as the characters being thoroughly searched and then thrown in prison -- prevent this ability's use. The item isn't being teleported, after all, it was there the whole time.

    This ability does not use any Flux, but once used cannot be used again until the character returns to a settlement where items are sold, or until a long rest if they're already in one.

    I Read Your Book: Starting at 13th level, the Guardian of the Future can get a sense of haunting familiarity when facing a creature capable of casting spells. When meeting a spellcaster for the first time, the DM compares the Guardian of the Future's passive Insight check against the spellcaster's spell save DC. If the Guardian of the Future has a higher score, the DM announces the creature is a spellcaster.

    Once the announcement is made, the Guardian of the Future may spend 1 Flux and the DM tells the Guardian a number of spells the spellcaster has prepared equal to the Guardian of the Future's Wisdom modifier. The DM may either choose the spells most frequently used, or choose the spells at random, their choice.

    Flip to the End: Starting at 18th level, the Guardian of the Future can predict actions by even the strongest of creatures. Creatures cannot take Legendary Actions at the end of the Guardian of the Future's turns as long as the Guardian of the Future has any unspent Flux left.


    Anomalies
    Starting at 1st level, Servants of Fate get access to special divine time magic effects known as Anomalies. While spells are invoked by incantations and gestures, the very nature of Fate mean these signals are not necessary to invoke the effects.

    Servants of Fate use Anomalies the same way most spellcasters use spells, typically invoking them as Standard Actions. They use Wisdom to dictate any Attack Rolls their Anomalies require, and saving throws against their Anomalies are based on the Servant of Fate’s Wisdom. Servants of Fate are may use holy symbols as divine spellcasting foci, but don’t require such to use their Anomalies.

    Each Anomaly can be Minor, Moderate or Major. The table above shows how many of each type the Servant of Fate knows by class level. When the Servant of Fate advances a level that adds a Moderate or Major Anomaly to their list, they may pick a new one, or “promote” a lower-level one and replace it with a lower-level one to fill the vacated slot.

    Technically, a Servant of Fate may use an Anomaly at a level lower than its value, for example, using a Moderate Anomaly as if it was Minor. However, the nature of Anomalies means there really aren’t a lot of reasons they’d ever need or want to do that.

    As with most spellcasters, when a Servant of Fate advances a level, they may replace one Anomaly with another of the same level. Alternatively, they can swap the levels of two Anomalies they have.

    Each Anomaly is categorized as Past, Present or Future. A Servant of Fate may not have more total Anomalies from any other individual Timeline than total Anomalies from their own.

    Past
    Spoiler: Anomalies of the Past
    Show

    Wound Reversal
    The Servant of Fate can pull flesh and blood back into place, healing wounds.

    Minor: By spending a Standard Action and 1 Flux, the Servant of Fate can repair damage to a living creature. The Servant of Fate must touch the wounded creature to use this ability.

    The damage healed is 1d6, plus an additional 1d6 per three Servant of Fate levels, plus the Servant of Fate’s Wisdom modifier. These dice become 1d8 when the Servant of Fate heals their own wounds.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, the recipient may also choose to spend up to two of their own Hit Dice.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, the Servant of Fate may use this ability as a Reaction to an available target taking damage from any attack. If they do so, that entire damage is healed, rather than rolling healing dice.

    In addition, the Servant of Fate may leave a short-term lingering effect on anyone they healed. If more healing is used on a target than the damage they’ve taken, that target gets half (rounded down) of the excess as temporary hit points which last one minute.

    System Unshock
    The Servant of Fate can return a living creature’s general state of physical and mental health from a few seconds ago.

    Minor: When the Servant of Fate or an ally within 30 feet attempts a saving throw to end an ongoing effect at the end of their turn, and the saving throw fails, the Servant of Fate may use their Reaction and spend 1 Flux to allow the victim to re-roll the saving throw.

    Because the target must be within 30 feet, this ability can’t reverse an effect that teleports the victim to another location, even if they were supposed to return to such a spot if they make their staving throw.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, the Servant of Fate may use this on any saving throw.

    In addition, when this ability is used on themselves, the Servant of Fate may make the re-rolled saving throw a Wisdom saving throw, even if the original saving throw used another ability.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, the Servant of Fate grants a re-roll to any number of targets within 30 feet against the same effect. In addition, all re-rolls granted by the effects get +2.

    Object Restoration
    The Servant of Fate can undo the damage of time on an object, restoring it to its former condition.

    Minor: The Servant of Fate can reform a nonmagic, nonliving, inanimate object (or group of related objects) of up to one pound in size, within 30 feet, from any damage it suffered within the last hour. A dropped and shattered bottle will be reformed, and its spilled contents returned to it.

    Since a repaired item must have most of its mass within a small area, it can’t be used on expended consumables – such as a meal which has been eaten, or a vial of acid throw at an opponent. If either was merely dropped on the floor and mostly contained, it can be returned. Similarly, if a book is burned and the ashes blow away in the wind, it can’t be repaired.

    This ability can be used to repair broken ammunition.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, the Servant of Fate can either restore an item up to fifty pounds, or restore damage to single-pound item. done up to one year ago.

    This ability can be used to repair broken or destroyed armor and weapons.

    In addition, the Servant of Fate can either repair a damaged or broken magical item. This requires 1 Flux. Or, the Servant of Fate can restore 1 charge to a magical item that gets at least 1 charge back during a long rest. This also costs 1 Flux, and cannot be used on the same item a second time until a long rest has passed (even by a different Servant of Fate).

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, the Servant of Fate may restore an item up to a ten-foot cube (such as a breached wall) from damage done up to an hour ago, or an item up to fifty pounds from damage up to a year ago, or an item up to one pound from damage from up to a century ago.

    Parallel
    The Servant of Fate sends themselves a few seconds back in time.

    Minor: At the end of any turn in which they have moved, but not spent any Flux yet, the Servant of Fate may spend 1 Flux (this is not an Action) and hop backwards briefly in time. This puts them back where they started their turn, effectively teleporting, possibly ending certain effects such as being Grappled or having fallen down a pit. There is no range limit.

    Once they have returned to that spot, the Servant of Fate may use a Standard Action, Move Action, or Bonus Action. They may not spend Flux until the start of their next turn.

    Upon ending their extra actions, their original form and their original form’s items vanish, because they used this power to revert time, leaving the duplicate behind.

    A possible use of this Anomaly is to Help oneself with a skill or ability check, if such an action takes just a few scant seconds, such as forcing a door with the strength of two men. How much Help the Servant of Fate can provide themselves is limited by the DM.

    Once this Anomaly is used, the original form of the Servant of Fate is immune to any effects, including damage and healing, because the original form is protected by paradox magic. For example, the Servant of Fate can’t receive the effect of mass cure wounds, then leap back in time to just before the spell was cast, and get healed a second time. But this also means a clever dragon can’t wait for the Servant of Time to duplicate themselves, then roast them both with flame breath.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, the Servant of Fate can jump back slightly further in time. They may take up to two actions (a Standard, a Move, and/or a Bonus Action, but not all three) when they arrive, and they may use this ability whether they have used Flux that turn or not. They still may not spend any more Flux until the start of their next turn.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, the Servant of Fate may take a full extra turn when they arrive (Standard, Move, and Bonus Actions) and may use Flux without any restrictions.

    Regardless of any effects the Servant of Fate might have, it is impossible to use Parallel while using Parallel. There is a maximum of two copies of the Servant of Time, and that cannot be bypassed.

    Reversion
    The Servant of Fate forces long dormant memories of a target to resurface.

    Minor: The Servant of Fate picks an unwilling creature within 30 feet and spends 1 Flux, The victim may make a Charisma saving throw to avoid the effect entirely.

    A living creature that fails has their mind flooded with memories of their youth, which can conflict with their training and experience. They suffer Disadvantage on all attacks, ability checks, and skill checks.

    An undead creature is instead shown memories from when they were alive. They lose the ability to use any Actions they could do in undeath, but not in life. For example, a wight would lose its ability to use Life Drain, but could still use its weapons. Abilities which are not Actions (such as “being vulnerable to radiant” or “being incorporeal”) are not blocked, because they don’t require any conscious thought to use.

    A construct is given “memories” of being an inanimate object. It is stunned, even if the construct in question is normally immune to being stunned.
    Either way, the duration is Concentration, maximum number of rounds equal to the Servant of Fate’s Wisdom modifier, and the target may make a Charisma saving throw at the end of each of their turns to end the effect early.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor effects, the Servant of Fate may affect up to three targets within 30 feet.

    In addition, any creatures under one year in age – such as recently animated undead and constructs – get Disadvantage on all saving throws against Reversion.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate effects, the targets also lose the ability to use any Actions which are class abilities, including casting spells. They may continue to use an already-active ability (it does not end Barbarian Rage or end Concentration) but can’t start any new ones. Even spellcasting monsters without class levels still forget how to cast spells while affected.


    Present
    Spoiler: Anomalies of the Present
    Show

    Several of the Present Anomalies talk about Capacity and Max Capacity.

    Your Capacity is half your Servant of Fate class level, rounded up, maximum nine. This represents the maximum size of an item that can be contained with a single Anomaly based on the Servant of Fate’s class level.

    Your Max Capacity is three times your Capacity, and represents the total size the Servant of Fate can have contained, spread out over all of their Anomalies (it is shared).

    Ravages of Time
    The Servant of Fate concentrates time onto a single point, warping it slightly out of reality.

    Minor: As a Standard Action, the Servant of Fate causes 1d8 force damage to a creature or object within 30 feet. The target may make a Charisma saving throw to avoid the effect.

    Alternatively, the Servant of Fate may improve the effect by spending 1 Flux. This causes the effect to have a five-foot radius, do a number of 1d8 force damage equal to the Servant of Fate’s proficiency bonus, and the Charisma saving throw halves the damage instead of negating it.

    Moderate: Damage becomes 2d8 if no Flux is spent, or 2d8 times the Servant of Fate’s Proficiency Bonus if a Flux is spent.

    Major: Damage becomes 3d8 if no Flux is spent.

    If a Flux is spent, the damage remains 2d8 times the Servant of Fate’s Proficiency Bonus, but the radius becomes 20 feet and only hits targets of the Servant of Fate’s choosing.

    In addition, all victims who fail their Saving Throw (Flux or not) are slowed on their next turn, as if affected by the spell of the same name.

    Long Term Storage
    The Servant of Fate places an inanimate, nonliving object out of time, preserving it exactly as the instant it was removed until it is later reclaimed. A steaming-hot bowl of steak and potato soup, for example, can be locked away while months pass, then brought back to normal time just as hot and tasty as when it was stored.

    Minor: The Servant of Fate can store nonmagical objects, either stationary objects or objects moving on a predictable path (such as items thrown by an ally). They can store an item within 30 feet, and it requires Capacity/Max Capacity of its weight in pounds (minimum one).

    Storing an item requires a Standard Action and costs one Flux. Releasing an item does not require any Flux.

    Stored items retain their momentum, which means if it was moving when it was stored, when it is returned to normal time, it’s moving just as quickly. The Servant of Fate does get to choose the direction of a restored moving object. This means the Servant of Fate can store moving projectiles and later use them to make ranged attacks.

    Because the Servant of Fate is controlling the direction of the returned item, the original attack bonuses of the object (if any) are replaced instead with the Servant of Fate’s spellcasting attack roll (in other words, their Proficiency Bonus plus their Wisdom modifier). The range of the released projectile is the same as when it was originally used, including both normal and long range.

    The item, when released, is placed by the Servant of Fate within 30 feet of their location. This does mean a Servant of Fate could, for example, hurl a rock or arrow around a corner to hit targets behind cover. However, if the Servant of Fate can’t see the target, the rules for concealment still

    A common use for this ability is grabbing falling objects, only to release them horizontally. In order for this to be an effective weapon, the object must have fallen a distance of at least sixty feet. Otherwise, it doesn’t have the velocity when released to be useful against a moving target.

    Such an item, when released, has a normal/long range of 20/60 like many thrown weapons.

    Most generic or rough objects (such as bricks, rocks, or metal ingots) do a number of 1d6 bludgeoning damage equal to half their weight, rounded down. Items specifically crafted for this purpose (such as an iron ball covered with steel spikes) use 1d8 damage dice instead, and can be slashing, bludgeoning or piercing as crafted.

    Generally speaking, each item counts as a separate use of this Anomaly, but the DM may decide a group of related items counts as a single item. For example, a Servant of Fate could not store a backpack containing twenty different potions, but probably would be allowed to store a pouch of coins or a quiver of arrows.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, the Servant of Fate is capable of capturing objects moving with a less predictable path. They can use their Long Term Storage to catch projectiles launched by enemies and traps that use Attack rolls. Doing so requires the Servant of Fate to make a Spellcasting Attack roll which equals or exceeds the Attack roll of the projectile.

    Also, the Servant of Fate may store magical items, such as potions, but not projectiles caused by spells (see Energy Containment below).

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, the Servant of Fate may store, or release, up to three items with a single action. If they are using Long Term Storage to capture moving objects, these objects must all be following a narrow path with a short time – which in game terms, means they must all be launched by the same source at the same target in the same Action (such as a ranger using Extra Attack, or the tail spikes flung by a manticore).

    Releasing multiple projectiles requires a separate Attack roll for each, but unlike capturing, they can be aimed at different targets.

    Energy Containment
    The Servant of Fate is capable of storing energy, such as the flames of a bonfire or a magic spell. The stored energy can later be returned to normal time, having the same effects as when it was stored.

    Minor: Using Energy Containment can pull energy from up to a five foot cube. Each 1d6 or 1d8 of damage requires one Capacity/Max Capacity. For example, at 1st level the Servant of Fate is capable of storing the flames from a bonfire, extinguishing it in the process. Catching other forms of energy (cold, lightning, radiant, etc) is also possible if a sufficient source is found. For example, grabbing part of a lightning stroke – being within 30 feet of the impact – could require imagination, planning and/or luck.

    If the energy source has more damage dice than the Servant of Fate chooses to store, then any damage that source does is reduced by the damage dice that have been stored. For example, if a Servant of Fate using a Readied Action grabs 3d6 damage from a 8d6 area attack, anyone standing in the remaining area takes the remaining 5d6 damage.

    Depending on the source, those damage dice might regenerate. For example, stealing a five-foot-cube from a raging forest fire or pool of lava will only reduce that cube’s damage for one round. Meanwhile, a forge or furnace would have its heat reduced for a minute until the remaining coals re-ignite the extinguished ones. Under such conditions, a Servant of Fate could use Energy Containment multiple times, extinguishing the forge entirely.

    Releasing energy also has a normal/long range of 30/120 feet. If the energy stored was the size of a human torso or smaller, attacking with this energy requires a Spellcasting Attack roll by the Servant of Fate. If the energy is any larger, all targets in the affected area may make a Dexterity Saving Throw for half damage.

    Alternatively, the Servant of Fate can store a spell that’s either stationary, or moving by a predictable path (such as a spell cast by an ally).

    Storing a spell, however, removes many of the spell’s bonuses from the original casting. This means the released spell is cast at the spell’s minimum level, uses the spell’s normal range (rather than the usual 30 feet), and uses the Servant of Fate’s Spellcasting Attack rolls and Saving Throw DC. Basically, the Servant of Fate basically casts the spell themselves instead of using all the details of the original caster. If the DM and the players agree, that rule can be changed to “the spell is stored exactly as cast”, if that makes it any more convenient for the paperwork.
    Spells can only be stored if they have some kind of physical presence, such as magic missile, fireball, wall of fire or light. This usually rules out transmutations, enchantments, psychic and necrotic damage, but the DM has the final word. The spell must also be “loose” when taken, so spells with range of Touch or Self also cannot be stored. Spells, when captured, ignore the damage restriction listed above and instead require one Capacity/Max Capacity per level of the spell, minimum one.

    Even if they are created by spells, conjured creatures cannot be captured or stored.

    Either way, the source must be within 30 feet of the Servant of Fate. Storing energy is a Standard Action and requires 1 Flux. Releasing energy is also a Standard Action but requires no Flux.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, the Servant of Fate is capable of capturing energy or spells moving with a less predictable path. They can use their Energy Containment to catch attacks launched by enemies and traps that use Attack rolls or Saving Throws. Doing so requires the Servant of Fate to make a Spellcasting Attack roll which equals or exceeds the Attack Roll or the Saving Throw of the attack or spell.

    In addition, the Servant of Fate can take energy from up to a ten foot cube. Further, when they release any stored energy, they may choose to have it be contained or burst. This, in turn, allows them to reshape any stored energy into either a ranged attack roll, a five-foot-cube, or a ten-foot-cube, decided at time of release.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, the Servant of Fate can disperse the energy immediately, rather than storing it.

    In addition, a Servant of Fate may store energy from up to a fifteen-foot cube. When they release energy, they may reshape it to a fifteen-foot cube, a 60-foot line or 20-foot cone, the latter two emanating from any point within 30 feet but facing the direction of their choice.

    Dismiss from Time
    The Servant of Fate shoves a creature out of time, temporarily removing it from existence.

    Minor: One creature can be affected. This may be a willing creature other than the Servant of Time, or any creature that has been conjured or summoned by magic. They must be within 30 feet of the Servant of Fate. Unwilling targets get a Charisma saving throw to avoid the effect.

    This costs 1 Flux, and has a duration of Concentration, with a maximum duration in rounds equal to the Servant of Fate’s Wisdom modifier.

    The creature is effectively removed from time and existence, vanishing without a trace. While so removed, links between that creature and the rest of the world are severed. For example, if the removed creature was Concentrating on a spell, that spell’s effect ends on any target other than the removed caster. Similarly, if that creature was under the effect of a spell that is maintained by Concentration by someone else, that link is also broken, even if that spell still remains on any other targets. As a result, if Dismiss from Time is used on a summoned or conjured creature by an effect that requires Concentration, because that link is broken, the summoning spell is ended and the creatures don’t come back, meaning the Servant of Fate does not need to maintain Concentration on the effect.

    Other effects on the creature remain. For example, a character that has been poisoned when stored will remain poisoned when they return. If they were Concentrating on a spell that affected themselves, that Concentration remains when they return.

    When creatures return, they are returned to the location from which they were removed. If any other creature occupies that space, that creature is harmlessly moved to the nearest empty space of their choice. (This movement does not require an Action nor does it provoke Attacks of Opportunity)

    Storing a willing creature takes 1 Capacity.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor effects, Dismiss from Time can now be used on any creature of Medium size or smaller, any undead creature, or any construct.

    Alternatively, the Servant of Time may use the ability on themselves. If they do so, they must declare ahead of time a duration (up to one hour) for which they will be removed. Because the Servant of Time is removed from time through this Anomaly, they do not experience any events that take place in normal time, so they don’t know what happened while removed. This also means they can’t change their mind and end the effect early.

    Storing an unwilling creature takes 3 Capacity.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate effects, Dismiss from Time may be used against any creature of any size, or on any number of willing creatures (including the Servant of Time) up to the Servant of Fate’s Proficiency Bonus for one round. Capacity requirements per creature do not change.

    Alternatively, when the Servant of Fate uses this ability on themselves, they may either extend the duration up to a century, or they may witness time as it passes for the normal duration of one hour, allowing them to end the effect early.


    Future
    Spoiler: Anomalies of the Future
    Show

    Moment to Strike
    By watching their opponent’s moves a split-second before they happen, the Servant of Fate can sense the perfect moment to attack with weapons.

    Minor: The Servant of Fate may use their Wisdom modifier instead of their Strength or Dexterity modifiers when making melee or ranged weapon attacks, making quick, opportunistic strikes on instinct rather than relying on training.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, when the Servant of Fate uses the Attack option with a melee or ranged weapon, they may attack two times instead of one.

    This feature does not stack with the Extra Attack 5th level class feature by making a total of three attacks. Instead, if the Servant of Fate has both the Extra Attack 5th level class feature and the Moderate Moment to Strike Anomaly, one of the attacks made (chosen before the attack is rolled of course) gets Advantage, as the Servant of Fate’s training is now so strong they can act on it, even during a quick strike.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, when the Servant of Fate uses the Attack option with a melee or ranged weapon, they may attack two additional times for a total of three. This still combines with Extra Attack to grant one of these attacks Advantage.

    If, somehow, a Servant of Fate has both the Major Moment to Strike Anomaly and also the 11th level version of Extra Attack, two of their attacks would have Advantage. But this would require them to be 22nd level.

    Precognative Reflexes
    The Servant of Fate is warned of danger a split-second before it strikes, allowing them to defend against it.

    Minor: The Servant of Fate can defend themselves based on their instinct and senses, more than their reflexes. They may use their Wisdom instead of their Dexterity for determining Armor Class (including the maximum bonus from Medium and Heavy Armor, since a split-second to react in plate mail isn’t enough) and become are proficient in shields while using this Anomaly (since a split-second to put a big chunk of wood between you and the attack is enough).

    In addition, when struck by a slashing, piercing and/or bludgeoning source of damage, including falling damage, the Servant of Fate may spend 1 Flux to respond slightly earlier, causing them to resist the physical damage caused by the attack. Any followup damage (such as the poison of a scorpion’s sting) is not resisted.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, spending 1 Flux now resists the entire attack, even if it is only partially physical.

    In addition, their warning ability extends slightly further when it comes to an attack. They are Proficient in Initiative checks. Further, when attacked by a source that’s visible but concealed (such as a wraith that fades out of a wall, or a rogue using Stealth) any Advantage gained from attacking while unseen is canceled.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, they can spend 1 Flux to resist any attack, even if it’s not physical.

    In addition, they can focus their future senses by spending a Bonus Action to Disengage and/or spend 1 Flux to Dodge as a Bonus Action.

    Transcendent Planning
    The Servant of Fate, by looking a short distance into the future, they are able to avoid catastrophic mistakes in a complicated task.

    Minor: Whenever the Servant of Fate makes an ability or skill check, and the natural 1d20 die rolled is a 9 or lower, they may add their Wisdom modifier to the check. Or, they may spend 1 Flux to re-roll the check. Either way, they must accept the result of the new roll.

    NOTE: The Servant of Fate may only “rewind” a skill or ability check in which they know within a few seconds they have failed. For example, during a Deception check, the Servant of Fate might say “Sir George won’t be here today, I’m his replacement” only to be met with “Sir George arrived a minute ago and he’s in the next room”. Being caught immediately in this lie would allow the Anomaly to be used. However, if Sir George were to arrive several minutes later, the Servant of Fate can’t reverse the original lie. The DM is the final judge in all cases.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, this Anomaly may now be used on a natural 11 or lower.

    Alternatively, the Servant of Fate may spend 1 Flux and, instead of re-rerolling the check, abort the check in its entirety. For example, if the Servant of Fate is searching a chest for traps, only to have the trap go off, the Servant of Fate can predict that result and choose to have never searched in the first place. Again, this can only be used if the effects of a failure happen within a few seconds.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, they may get both benefits (a re-roll which gets the Wisdom modifier added) when spending 1 Flux, and the Anomaly may now be used on a natural 14 or less.

    Alternatively, the Servant of Fate may use this as a Reaction to anyone within 30 feet making a skill or ability check, and the natural 1d20 roll being a 9 or less. They, too, may re-roll the check and add the Servant of Fate’s Wisdom modifier to the re-roll. This also uses 1 Flux.

    Twisted Future Visions
    The Servant of Fate causes a creature to see several alternate versions of the future a few seconds in advance, confusing them and making them second guess their actions.

    Minor: The Servant of Fate spends 1 Flux and a creature within 30 feet makes a Charisma saving throw. If they success, they ignore the effect.
    If they fail, on their next turn, the target announces their planned Standard, Move and Bonus Action to the Servant of Fate’s player before they are taken. After that happens, the Servant of Fate chooses one of those actions, and the target must replace that Action with another one.

    The replacement action must be significantly different from the original in some way, although the target still gets to pick the action. It can be as simple as changing “bite the fighter” to “bite the rogue”, swapping out which spell is cast, or moving to a different location. There does have to be at least one meaningful difference. For example, a Servant of Fate uses this Anomaly on a wizard, who then announces they will cast a fireball hitting all four party members. If the Servant of Fate dictates that Standard Action must be redone, the wizard cannot simply throw the same fireball six inches further, still hitting all four party members. They could pick a spot that only hits three party members, or possibly cast another spell entirely, or replace the spell with another action such as Dash or Dodge.

    This Anomaly cannot prevent a target from not using a listed action. The target can, however, choose to replace a swapped action with “no Action”.
    The effect only lasts until the end of the target’s turn.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, the Servant of Fate can choose “Reaction” instead. Since many Reactions can only be used in restricted conditions (for example, an Opportunity Attack can only be used on the moving target), the replacement is usually “no Reaction yet”.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, the Servant of Fate may now choose “Legendary Action” instead, and further, may force two different types of Actions (such as “Move Action and Standard Action”) to be replaced.

    Split Destiny
    The Servant of Fate can look at a possible timeline a few seconds in the future from multiple perspectives, letting them yell out instructions to their allies.

    Minor: Using their Standard Action and spending 1 Flux, the Servant of Fate may direct a number of allies up to their Charisma modifier (min 1). Each ally affected rolls 1d8 and splits the result in any way they wish between Attack Rolls and AC, and the effects last until the end of the Servant of Fate’s next turn.

    Split Destiny does not stack with another use of Split Destiny.

    Moderate: In addition to the Minor benefits, use of Split Destiny becomes a Bonus Action, and the Servant of Fate is affected in addition to the listed number of allies.

    In addition, anyone affected whose 1d8 roll is lower than their Proficiency Bonus instead gets a bonus equal to their Proficiency Bonus.

    Major: In addition to the Minor and Moderate benefits, the affected targets get the same bonus to weapon and spell damage rolls as they took for Attack Rolls, and get the same bonus to all saving throws as they took for AC.


    Twist of Fate
    A Servant of Fate gets a Twist of Fate at 3rd level. They get an additional one at 6th, 10th, and 14th levels. You may not take a Twist of Fate that is higher level than your Servant of Fate class level.

    Some Twists of Fate is associated with a Timeline. You may not take more Twists of Fate from any other individual Timeline than Twists of Fate from your own.

    When you advance a Servant of Fate level, if you did not change any of your Anomalies, you may replace one of your Twists of Fate with a replacement allowed by your new/current Servant of Fate level.

    Spoiler: Twists of Fate
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    Temporal Extension: Any range of 30 feet in any Anomaly becomes 60 feet.

    Flux Capacitor: Your maximum Flux increases by 1.

    Not Yet (6th level): When any ally within 30 feet loses Concentration before the effect’s maximum duration has ended, you may spend 1 Flux as a Reaction to extend the duration until the end of that ally’s next turn. That ally may spend their Standard Action to resume Concentrating on the effect, as if Concentration had never been lost in the first place.

    Déjà vu (10th level): You cannot be Surprised.

    Anchored (14th level): You may use your Reaction to counter any haste, slow, or time stop spell or effect, as long as you are aware of the attempt. Range is not a factor.

    Doomed to Repeat It (Past): When making an Intelligence ability or skill check to remember something your character previously learned, you may choose to automatically roll a natural 15. You also have Advantage on any saving throws that cause you to forget something, including reversion.

    Time Heals All Wounds (Past): Wound reversal heals for an extra die.

    Multi Memory (Past, 6th level): When you use wound reversal or object restoration, you may affect a second target at no additional cost.

    Saw It Coming (Past, 10th level): When you re-roll a saving throw due to system unshock, you get Advantage on it.

    Lost in the Past (Past, 14th level): Reversion does not require Concentration.

    Enhanced Storage (Present): Your Max Capacity is four times your Capacity instead of three.

    Entropy Shield (Present): You may use energy containment as a Reaction to being affected by a damaging spell or effect the Anomaly can store, but you have to declare this before the damage roll or saving throw is made. You may use long term storage as a Reaction to being targeted by a physical projectile the Anomaly can store, but you have to declare this before the Attack Roll is made.

    Energy Echoes (Present, 6th level): If you store two copies of the same spell, you may merge them in storage to a single copy that’s one level higher. This may be used repeatedly to raise a spell’s level multiple times, but no higher spell level than your Capacity.

    Time Zone (Present, 10th level): When you use dismiss from time on your home plane, any target not native to your home plane has Disadvantage on the saving throw.

    Blinked Out (Present, 14th level): You may use any Anomaly to Store as a Reaction.

    Nick of Time (Future): When using precognitive reflexes and wearing armor, your AC improves by an additional 1.

    Seize the Moment (Future): You may spend 1 Flux to negate Disadvantage on an Attack Roll you make.

    Timely Warning (Future, 6th level): All subjects of your split destiny get Evasion while affected. If they attempt a Dexterity saving throw for half damage, they instead take no damage if they success, and half damage if they fail.

    Deadly Premonition (Future, 10th level): While using moment to strike, you score a critical hit with a weapon if your natural attack roll is a 19 or 20.

    Reactionary (Future, 14th level): When using moment to strike, ignore your target’s Dexterity bonus to AC.


    Chosen of Destiny
    At 20th level, the Servant of Fate has progressed so far in the eyes of their time deity they now have the ability to re-write events as they occur into their choosing. For one minute, all their Anomalies are Major, they have Advantage on all saving throws, and they get a special pool of 6 Flux they use before their normal Flux. Once used, Chosen of Destiny cannot be used again until a full day is spent in mediation and prayer.
    Last edited by Breccia; 2019-12-15 at 09:29 PM.