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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    scarmiglionne4's Avatar

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    Default D&D 3.5 Gritty Battle Options (Golden Axe/Sieken Densetsu) PEACH

    UPDATE: 03/25/2013
    I modified some stuff I found in a D20 pirate game and some house-rule stuff I saw on a thread here. I do not recall where I saw the original stuff.

    Duels are gone. All combat is going to pretty much work like that. The only duel rules are initiative is rolled every round for 1-on-1 combat.

    I am posting this as I finish it. This is what I have so far.

    COMBAT STANCE
    Participants in combat may make use of combat stances. Choosing a stance is a free action that must be taken at the beginning of a combatant’s turn.
    Neutral: No effect. This is the stance each combatant is in after they are no longer flat-footed and until they choose another stance.
    Aggressive: An aggressive stance means a melee combatant is trying to inflict as grievous a wound as possible. The combatant may choose to subtract a number from all melee attack rolls and add the same number to all melee damage rolls. This number may not exceed the combatant’s base attack bonus. While in this stance, the combatant is considered flat-footed against incoming attacks and loses their free parry attempt.
    Defensive: A defensive stance means the combatant is trying to avoid attacks in an attempt to find an opening for a riposte. The combatant may take a penalty on all attack rolls and add the same number as a dodge bonus to their armor class and parry attempts. This number may not exceed the combatant’s base attack bonus.
    Attempting to parry removes this bonus to armor class should the parry fail.
    Total Defense: Total defense means the combatant is trying their best to avoid attacks. The combatant gets a +4 dodge bonus to your armor class and any parry attempts, but cannot riposte until another stance is chosen.
    Focused: A focused stance means a combatant making use of a ranged weapon is taking extra care to be as deadly accurate as possible. The combatant may choose to take a –1 penalty on all ranged attack rolls to gain a +2 bonus on all ranged damage rolls. With a +4 base attack bonus, and every +4 thereafter, the penalty increases by –1 and the bonus to damage increases by +2. The bonus damage does not apply to touch attacks or effects that do not deal it point damage. While in this stance, the combatant is considered flat-footed against incoming attacks and cannot parry.

    PARRY AND RIPOSTE
    Whenever you are targeted by anything that requires an attack roll that isn't a touch attack, you can to try to parry the attack. Parrying functions as an opposed attack roll. You must declare that you are parrying before you know the result of the incoming attack roll. If your attack is higher than your opponent’s, you negate their attack. You can parry a number of times per round equal to the number of attacks you are granted during a full-attack action plus 1.
    Your first parry in a round is free and uses your highest attack bonus. Any other parry attempts cost the use of one of your attacks the following round as part of a full-attack action and forces this to be the action you take the next round. The parry attempt uses the attack bonus for the attack spent. Attacks are spent in the order they would occur in a full-attack action. You may choose to make a full-attack action without using all of the attacks.
    If you have a shield equipped you are able to parry 1 additional time for free. You use your highest attack bonus and add the shield’s armor class bonus to the check. Parrying with a shield prevents its use for a shield bash for the following round.
    If you are fighting with two weapons, you may parry with both or either at your discretion and may make as many parries as you have attacks with both or either weapon per round.
    For each size category difference between the weapons, you suffer a -2 penalty to your parry roll (shields are considered one size larger for this purpose). In regards to projectile weapons, use the size of the ammunition. You can only parry ranged attacks with a shield.
    If you are using a defensive stance you gain the bonus to armor class to your parry roll (but the attack penalty to any ripostes you make AND normal attacks as part of the full-attack action taken the following round). You can parry while using the total defense stance, and you gain the armor class bonus to your parry rolls, but you cannot make any ripostes or attacks while doing so.
    You can only make one parry attempt for each enemy attack roll. You have to be aware of an attack to parry it.
    If you fail your parry attempt, the attacker takes their attack roll and applies it to your flat- footed armor class to determine if they were able to damage you. If you used a shield to parry, you also lose that bonus to your armor class.
    Regardless of whether you succeed at the parry or not, your next action must be a full-attack action. You will make any attacks you have remaining, if any, or take a 5-foot step.
    Whenever you parry an attack, you can attack your attacker using the parry roll as the attack roll. If you are parrying while two-weapon fighting, you riposte with whichever weapon you didn’t parry with and use the attacking weapons attack bonus. The defender may parry this attack as they would any other attack. You cannot make a riposte on your turn. You can riposte once per successful parry.

    OLD STUFF
    CRITICAL HITS
    Whenever a critical hit is scored against a creature that creature must succeed a Fortitude save DC 10 + attacker’s base attack bonus + attacker’s Wisdom modifier. On a failed save the attacker rolls 1d10 to determine hit location and then roll 1d12 + attacker’s strength mod and any bonuses to hit inherent in the weapon – defender’s constitution mod to determine severity on the critical hit tables (see critical hit table).
    Weapons that do more than x2 damage on a critical hit under this system still only do x2 damage. However, for each point above x2 they have the wielder would add +1 to the DC to avoid the critical hit and +1 to severity rolls. Therefore, a weapon’s critical threat range for a longsword would be listed like so: (19-20/+0). This shows the threat range followed by the bonus to the Fortitude save DC to avoid critical severity and the bonus to the severity roll.

    WOUNDS
    Wounds are divided into five degrees of severity: grazed, struck, injured, broken, and finally shattered/severed/crushed.
    Wounds should be recorded on the character sheet. Attack and movement penalties remain until the injury that created the penalty has healed.
    Severe injuries can temporarily reduce a character's maximum allowable hit points. If the character has more hit points than he is currently allowed, he is reduced to the injured value when the current battle is over. This represents the increased vulnerability of badly wounded characters.
    Grazed: Grazes are minor injuries that may prove troublesome if they bleed. Healing capable of restoring 4 hp will heal a graze. Grazes also heal naturally as if they were a loss of 1d6 hp. If a grazed character receives healing, the graze is healed and he gets to recover hit points.
    Struck: A body part that has been struck is often penalized in a small way for the effects of the wound. Injuries of this type can be healed by healing capable of restoring 5 hp of damage. Struck areas heal naturally as if they were a loss of 2d6 hp.
    Injured: Wounds of this severity can trouble a character for weeks; they heal naturally as if they were a loss of 10d6 hp. Healing capable of restoring 10 hit points can also repair the injury. Injuries almost always entail serious combat penalties for the wounded character.
    Injured arms, legs, or tails reduce a character to 75% of his normal hit points. An injury to the abdomen, torso, or head reduces a character to 50% of his normal hit points.
    Injuries can sometimes only be healed with a regenerate spell.
    Broken: Broken bones run the gamut from minor fractures that don't hinder a character at all to life-threatening compound fractures. Generally, the previous two injury categories are considered to include minor breaks or cracks; this category is reserved for severe fractures. Broken bones can be mended by a cure serious wounds spell that is devoted just to knitting the bone; the character regains no hit points from a spell used in this way. Broken bones heal naturally as if they were 20d6 lost hit points, so bed rest in the care of a proficient healer is a really good idea if the injured character is planning on resuming his adventuring career anytime soon.
    Broken arms reduce a character to 75% of his normal hit points. Broken ribs or legs reduce a character to 50% of his normal hit points. Any other broken bones reduce a character to 25% of his normal hit points.
    Crushed, Shattered, or Destroyed: Limbs that suffer this kind of catastrophic injury may never be usable again; hits to the torso, abdomen or head of this magnitude are often lethal. If the victim survives, he will never naturally recover to his normal self. A limb damaged this way will be useless for the rest of his life, and hits anywhere else will leave the victim incapacitated. The victim will be bedridden for at least one to eight months before he can even regain a semblance of mobility.
    Destroyed shoulders, hips, or limbs reduce the victim to 50% of his normal maximum hit points. Any other wounds of this magnitude reduce the victim to 25% of his normal total. The only way to undo this kind of damage is by means of a regenerate spell.
    Severed: Obviously, a creature that has a limb severed can no longer engage in activities that require the use of that member. A human with a severed leg can't walk or run and is reduced to crawling until he gets a crutch. The only way to undo this kind of damage is by means of a regenerate spell.
    Losing a limb forces a character to make a Fortitude save DC 15 to avoid shock. Failure will prevent a character from moving independently or attacking for 2d10 days due to shock. Success results in the character being stunned for 1d6 rounds, and can only make partial actions.
    The loss of a limb will reduce a character's maximum normal hit points by 25% for a partial loss, or 50% for a more catastrophic loss. If the character can compensate with a wooden leg or hook, the hit point loss may be reduced by one step.
    Bleeding: A character with minor bleeding loses an additional 1d2 hp per minute until the wound is magically healed or bound. In addition, there is a chance that minor bleeding will stop on its own. The character may roll a Fortitude Save DC 15 he suffers damage from minor bleeding; if he is successful, the bleeding stops.
    Anybody can stop minor bleeding by applying a bandage or otherwise addressing the injury. This takes 1d6 combat rounds.
    Major bleeding results in a loss of 1d2 hp per combat round until the wound is magically healed or bound. Left untreated, major bleeding can easily cause a character's death. In effect, the –10 rule represents major bleeding; the character loses 1 hp per round when reduced to negative hit points.
    Major bleeding can be stopped by a cure light wounds spell (the victim recovers hit points, too), the healing of 5 hp of damage by any other magical means, or by a successful use of the healing skill. If the wound is bound by an untrained character, make a Wisdom check for the would-be medic. If he fails, he is unable to help. If he makes the check, the bleeding is reduced to minor.
    Severe bleeding causes the victim to lose 10–60% (1d6x10%) of his original hit point total every combat round. For example, if a fighter normally has 43 hit points but receives a severe bleeding result, he loses 4 hp (10%) to 24 hp (60%) in each round of severe bleeding. Needless to say, this is extremely lethal.
    A cure light wounds spell (or 5 hp of healing) will reduce severe bleeding to major bleeding; a cure serious wounds spell (or 10 hp of healing) reduces it to minor bleeding; and a cure critical wounds or heal spell stops it altogether. An untrained character has no chance to bind a torso, abdomen, or head wound with severe bleeding, but a successful use of the healing skill DC 25 reduces severe bleeding to major bleeding.
    Note that once a character drops below 0 hit points, regardless of the number and combination of wounds she is suffering from, she only suffers the effects of major bleeding (i.e., only 1 hit point is deducted per round).
    Last edited by scarmiglionne4; 2013-03-25 at 03:25 PM.

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Orc in the Playground
     
    BlueKnightGuy

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    Default Re: D&D 3.5 Gritty Battle Options PEACH

    Hm, well, I'd have to play around with this a while before I could be sure, but my initial impression is that melee PCs will be unlikely to level up to the point at which they could realistically hope to get a Regenerate spell.

    I was also wondering (perhaps the table makes this clear) what happens if the target makes its save. Does that negate the critical?

  3. - Top - End - #3
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    scarmiglionne4's Avatar

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    Default Re: D&D 3.5 Gritty Battle Options PEACH

    They still receive double damage, but not the extra effect. I have a way that spells can be learned that are above what casters will ever be able to cast because of the 10th level cap. I will have to add Regenerate to the Miracles list.

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    Bugbear in the Playground
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    Default Re: D&D 3.5 Gritty Battle Options PEACH

    @Deathblow
    Death-attack with a fort-save, this seems to be the result of a special power rather than examination.
    I'd say a more pragmatic approach would be to raise crit range and generally nasty-up critical hits base rules.

    @Wounds
    Hmmm, know what may actually be good here?
    Pathfinder changed the rules of how Con damage works into a far more nastier version (http://www.d20pfsrd.com/basics-abili...y-Score-Damage), wounds could easily just cause status effects to cause X con damage and perhaps other things. If I may:

    Chewy Grit Rules
    When using these rules as a DM it is advised you have a card printed out for each player detailing all condition rules, and a special DM card on how to apply conditions.
    Conditions are added when all damage is rolled, separated into damage types, when a critical hit is rolled, a critical save fumble or a critical spell resistance penetration (in the case of a no save SR) it applies a severe condition instead.
    To cure a condition you must stabilize the creature's condition by using any spell that could restore ability point damage (conditions count as 1Con healed and Severe conditions count as 3 con healed), or by initiating a heal check which can be made normally or in-part of using any spell or effect that intentionally and specifically heals, stabilizes or restores a single target.

    For DM:
    Roll a D8 whenever a damage source successfully deals damage roll a d8, then apply conditions to the appropriate section, as follows:
    1)Head/Neck
    2)Shoulders
    3)Arms
    4)UpperTorso
    5)Hands
    6)Lower Torso
    7)Legs
    8)Feet

    Alternatively you may aim for a section by taking a -2 to your roll, adding +2 to their save, or by adding +2 to their SR for your single target spell effect or -5 to your roll, +5 to their saves or by adding +5 to their SR for a multi-target attack, spell or effect.

    (Struck Removed, changed names and effects)

    Bleeding-
    Lose 1hp(+1 per 4HD)/round, stacks with other bleeding.
    Cure bleeding by subtracting 3HP from a healing spell's effects, with a close wounds spell, or by being stablized with a DC equal to the cause of the bleed.
    Bleeding may be applied multiple times, and must be cured multiple times, becoming Bleeding1, Bleeding2, Bleeding3, ect.

    Laceration (aka Grazed)-
    Fort DC5+Damage Taken+Special or gain Bleeding1
    Special is equal to weapon enchantment modifier plus any feats or class abilities to raise damage without variables.
    Puncture-
    As laceration.

    Contusion-
    As laceration, with -2 Fort Save DC and +2 Stabilize DC.

    (Severe Conditions):

    Injured-
    Make three Fort DC8+Damage Taken+Special(as lacerated) saves, if you succeed all of them you resist being wounded, if you fail one your part is injured, if you fail two it is broken, and if you fail three it is destroyed.
    Being injured means you take -5 to checks and -2 to other rolls using that part. Having that part injured again increases it to Disabled.

    Disabled-
    While disabled if the part that was hit was your head it is disabled and you are considered staggered, if it's another part of you that part of you is considered stunned and cannot take any actions. You take a -1 con and dexterity penalty while under this condition, this penalty also acts like Con damage for the purposes of reducing your HP.
    Having that part injured or disabled increases it to destroyed.

    Destroyed (aka shattered/severed/crushed)-
    While a part of you is destroyed it may be ruined or severed depending on the damage, a ruined arm can be healed back with a DC35 long-term care heal check, or can be restored in any way a severed arm could be. A severed arm can be healed back with a DC40 long-term care heal check as long as the check is started no more than 10 rounds after the arm is severed, sparing a bucket of ice or gentle repose, ect.
    If a head is destroyed make a fourth fort save (as a death effect targeting the head) or be slain.
    While a part is destroyed you are considered having 3 Constitution damage and another +2 damage if this was your head or torso.
    If you are capable of living without your head, or if your anatomy is somehow different enough to negate internal organ damage then do not add additional effects for the head or torso respectively.

    @Duels and Parry
    I'd talk to Djinn in Tonic, he's been working on an "opening" system for melee duels for quite some time.

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    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    scarmiglionne4's Avatar

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    Default Re: D&D 3.5 Gritty Battle Options PEACH

    @ Hanuman

    This would seem to eliminate the need for critical hit tables, which is an advantage I have to say. I think I like the detail tables offer, however. Also, it would seem that this method makes severe damage easier to heal. I was really looking for a feeling of permanence to it. The game this is going to be for is focused on barbarian tribes.

    I will be thinking about your post. I can't decide if that's really right for my game or not.

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    Bugbear in the Playground
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    Default Re: D&D 3.5 Gritty Battle Options PEACH

    Oh no just change it around until you like it. If you are worried about too many good heal checks make restorative magic dangerous and painful, possibly sending them into systemic shock.

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    Mighty_Chicken's Avatar

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    Default Re: D&D 3.5 Gritty Battle Options (Golden Axe/Sieken Densetsu) PEACH

    scarmiglionne, may I ask you what the advantage of parrying is in your system?

    It doesn't improve your defense - well it does, in a sense, because it guarantees you won't get anything less than 10 in your "dodge check". But then you have to sacrifice a minor attack for a chance, and not a good one because you need an advantage of 4, of trading that minor attack into a full bonus attack.

    I can see the advantages for a character with at least 3 attacks per turn. But at tenth level and below... you're trading a +0 attack for a change of doing a +5 attack?

    My mind is a little too slow right now to do that probability math, but I think that generally it isn't that good unless you're dealing with an enemy with bad attack bonus and good armor, isn't it?

    A second question: opposing checke are twice as random as standard testes. So any bonuses or disavantages are only worth half of what they would be worthy normally. That's why there's a lot of house rules for opposing ability checks: a goblin has a good chance of defeating an ogre in an arm wrestle.

    That's the reason why Improved Manouver feats give a +2, and not a +4, bonus in Pathfinder. Because in an opposing check (3.5), a +4 bonus gives you only a 10% advantage, the same as a +2 bonus on a simples check (PF).

    So the question finally is, are you ok with that? Using the standard AC, a tank-y warrior with 22 AC has a 60% advantage over a commonner (AC 10) to defend a blow. In your duel system, the warrior only has a 30% advantage.

    Of course, the warrior could claim his whole advantage back by parrying. So, parrying helps heavy-armored people to turn minor attacks into full BAB attacks? Now that I'm looking at it, your system seems more dynamix then it appeared initially, but what do you think of these points I'm raising?
    bock!

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    Dwarf in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: D&D 3.5 Gritty Battle Options (Golden Axe/Sieken Densetsu) PEACH

    Quote Originally Posted by Mighty_Chicken View Post
    scarmiglionne, may I ask you what the advantage of parrying is in your system?

    It doesn't improve your defense - well it does, in a sense, because it guarantees you won't get anything less than 10 in your "dodge check". But then you have to sacrifice a minor attack for a chance, and not a good one because you need an advantage of 4, of trading that minor attack into a full bonus attack.

    I can see the advantages for a character with at least 3 attacks per turn. But at tenth level and below... you're trading a +0 attack for a change of doing a +5 attack?

    My mind is a little too slow right now to do that probability math, but I think that generally it isn't that good unless you're dealing with an enemy with bad attack bonus and good armor, isn't it?

    A second question: opposing checke are twice as random as standard testes. So any bonuses or disavantages are only worth half of what they would be worthy normally. That's why there's a lot of house rules for opposing ability checks: a goblin has a good chance of defeating an ogre in an arm wrestle.

    That's the reason why Improved Manouver feats give a +2, and not a +4, bonus in Pathfinder. Because in an opposing check (3.5), a +4 bonus gives you only a 10% advantage, the same as a +2 bonus on a simples check (PF).

    So the question finally is, are you ok with that? Using the standard AC, a tank-y warrior with 22 AC has a 60% advantage over a commonner (AC 10) to defend a blow. In your duel system, the warrior only has a 30% advantage.

    Of course, the warrior could claim his whole advantage back by parrying. So, parrying helps heavy-armored people to turn minor attacks into full BAB attacks? Now that I'm looking at it, your system seems more dynamix then it appeared initially, but what do you think of these points I'm raising?
    I have been working on this and have some updates that I have yet to post. I honestly have not kept up with this because I thought no one was paying attention, so thanks for the PEACH.

    One thing I have been toying with allowing a single parry attempt per round that does not take away one of your attacks.

    The basic idea behind this is deadlier fighting. I will be using a slightly modified version of the massive damage threshold rules from Thieves' World (although I haven't really nailed down all my modifications).

    The concerns you are raising is pretty much what I am going for. I want the commoner to have a better chance to kill the warrior.

    On a side note, there will not be very much heavy armor in my game, and no magic armor at all, at least not +1 to +5 stuff.

    Oh, and I am making dueling how all battles work. It obviously needs a bit of simplification towards that end.

    As soon as I have something that isn't a total mess, I will be posting it. I really need something said about my magic system. If you or anyone you know might be interested, it's in my sig.

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