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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Halfling in the Playground
     
    PirateGuy

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    Default 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Hello All,
    I picked up a old copy of the viking campaign setting for AD&D. I love the flavor and intend to use some of the ideas for a 3.5 game I'm starting. The problem of course is that I am having a lot of trouble with the conversions. The conversion guide is not exactly easy to use. Any one know of a completed conversion. In particular:

    1. Weapons and Armor conversion. It specifically disallows full plate and many other armors. Pg 80 of the viking campaign describes possible armors as padded, leather, byrnie (similar to chainmail), with a very rare scalemail. No heavy armor is possible. Being at sea this might be wise (Swim checks!). but players might feel really restricted. Any other options you can think of would help. Even if they are same AC just different names and descriptions. I want the world to be immersive.

    2. Convert or how to flavor text a caster of any kind into the rune caster from the viking campaign setting? I really enjoyed the descriptions of the different runes supplied.

    3. This is flavor based but suggestions for Nordic names for some of the aquatic races from stormrack (and any advice on witch of them to stay away from)

    4. The smallest boat I can allow for my party is the probably going to need a total crew of ~20. So I will need to deal with a mostly NPC crew. Any advice on keeping the crew fighting from interfering with the player characters. Some mass fighting rules perhaps or where to find them?
    I plan to include crew morale and training if there are any rules that will help with that. If not I can make them up....prefer to keep home-ruling to a reasonable minimum. I do consider rule 0 + common sense a necessity at times.

    Sorry about how wordy that was. Please respond, if you will, in the form of
    4. you could do this ____
    2. Find this here __

    I appreciate any help you offer people.

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    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Imp

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    1: Seriously don't worry about this one. If your players are happy with playing a Viking-style game, then they should be happy not wearing armour, or using any other equipment for that matter, that is not appropriate to the setting. There's rules for guns in the DMG, but most players are happy to ignore them if they don't fit into the standard medieval-fantasy setting. Same applies here.

    Having said that, if you want to be inclusive, rather than exclusive, then don't be afraid to let your players go outside the box. They're PC's for a reason. If a player can come up with a good IC, setting-appropriate way to have (for example) Full-Plate armour, then go ahead and just let him have it. Just don't make it the norm. Stress to your players that it is unusual to have non-standard gear and as such will have certain repercussions; e.g. a dude in a full-plate equivalent is going to stand out in a crowd, draw suspicion, etc.
    I apologise if I come across daft. I'm a bit like that. I also like a good argument, so please don't take offence if I'm somewhat...forthright.

    Please be aware; when it comes to 5ed D&D, I own Core (1st printing) and SCAG only. All my opinions and rulings are based solely on those, unless otherwise stated. I reserve the right of ignorance of errata or any other source.

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    Pixie in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    1.0 I don't have much suggestion on actual items, but I'm running a Rokugan game atm and I've used the alternate rules where they roll their AC with armor bonuses. It makes combat more interactive for them and less DC to hit, I bring it up because it makes lower tiers of armor less of a downside for people with low dex, they just need to roll higher. For a heavy combat setting/game It could make it interesting. (And my Players love when they hit on a nat 1 but hate when they miss with a nat 20)

    1.1 You could also open up feats like Irongut to anyone, where it grants Nat armor to represent the hearty and battle tested people vikings were.

    2.0 Theres a feat called inscribe rune and a prestige class Runecaster in Players guide to Faerune, those both seem worth looking into.

    3.0 Google? best I've got.

    4.0 Depends on the ship, they could have slave ships where the rowers don't engage, Could make PC the boarding crew, could position the PC in critical spots and have NPC behind them reloading(or otherwise supplying ammo), or other less than glorious jobs during combat. Slippery boots? every time combat happens the rest of the crew falls off the other side and doesn't make it back up until combats ended?

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    Halfling in the Playground
     
    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by JellyPooga View Post
    1: Seriously don't worry about this one. If your players are happy with playing a Viking-style game, then they should be happy not wearing armour, or using any other equipment for that matter, that is not appropriate to the setting. There's rules for guns in the DMG, but most players are happy to ignore them if they don't fit into the standard medieval-fantasy setting. Same applies here.

    Having said that, if you want to be inclusive, rather than exclusive, then don't be afraid to let your players go outside the box. They're PC's for a reason. If a player can come up with a good IC, setting-appropriate way to have (for example) Full-Plate armour, then go ahead and just let him have it. Just don't make it the norm. Stress to your players that it is unusual to have non-standard gear and as such will have certain repercussions; e.g. a dude in a full-plate equivalent is going to stand out in a crowd, draw suspicion, etc.
    I like that. Thanks man.
    "Sure you can find Full plate. Oh no there is a storm and you fall in the water....enjoy!" Or "my that's some lovely armor you have there.... shame if something... happened to you. You best let me take that off your hands before someone kills you for it."

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    Halfling in the Playground
     
    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Roclat View Post
    1.1 You could also open up feats like Irongut to anyone, where it grants Nat armor to represent the hearty and battle tested people vikings were.
    Is this a homebrew feat? I don't think i have heard of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roclat View Post
    2.0 Theres a feat called inscribe rune and a prestige class Runecaster in Players guide to Faerune, those both seem worth looking into.
    I have looked at that before.... it kinda sucks honestly. Even for normal campaign settings. But the inscribe rune feat could be useful.... I would have to assign spell levels to the runes described in the campaign settings and assign duration's ....sounding kind of homerule-ish sigh.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roclat View Post
    4.0 Depends on the ship, they could have slave ships where the rowers don't engage, Could make PC the boarding crew, could position the PC in critical spots and have NPC behind them reloading(or otherwise supplying ammo), or other less than glorious jobs during combat. Slippery boots? every time combat happens the rest of the crew falls off the other side and doesn't make it back up until combats ended?
    I try not to be quite that obvious man. Appreciate the thought though.

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Ironguts is a Pathfinder feat that grants a +2 racial bonus to saves made to avoid being sickened/nauseated and a +2 bonus to Survival checks to find food for yourself, but I've never heard of an irongut feat that grants a natural armor bonus.
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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    1. How historical is this going to be?
    Because plate didn't exist in the Viking era. As others have pointed out, if you want the flavor, keep the restrictions. They didn't have greatswords, pikes or katana then etiher: think your players will feel restricted for not having them?

    2. Keep the runecasters almost as they are. It doesn't mesh with the rest of D&D magic, but it's flavorful and fun. Converting the stuff shouldn't take too long. An hour or so for a first draft.

    Something like a cleric: d8 HD, 3/4 BAB, 4 or 6 skill points, a lot of class skills.

    Most of the runes are straight-forward enough. Ale Rune is Detect Poison
    Berserk Rune grants Barbarian Rage (allow it to stack with normal rage), Catch Rune is the Snatch Arrows feat, Change Rune would be a limited Polymorph effect, etc.
    You might want to reconsider the bit about players having no say about what runes they learn. If so, you'll have to assing some level prereqs to some of those runes.

    Other class abilities, spread out over the levels, might be things that are equivalent to metamagic feats: ability to inscribe runes quicker, have them last longer, have them be more effective, ability to make magic items based on the runes, etc.


    Edit: the Mystara supplement "The Northern Reaches" has its own variant of runecasting. It's not d20 but it might be easier to convert.
    Last edited by BWR; 2013-06-09 at 09:05 AM.

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    NecromancerGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    1. What conversions do you need? Aside from calling Chainmail Byrnie, those are all PHB armors. I recommend using the Class level based AC from Unearthed Arcana, that will let you technically not have heavy armor while still giving heavy armor classes a leg up in AC. I also recommend using the DR from armor rules on top, having wearing armor give just DR (magical pluses will still be AC).

    2. Tell us more about Runecasters, please. Off the top of my head though, I'd say that you probably want casters going off a restricted spell list with some long term buffs, healing, and some weather/nature stuff. This makes me think PF witch(pathfinder srd), Savage Bard(Unearthed Arcana), or Adept(DMG) and I'd steer away from Witch, because this is a setting where high tier casters just shouldn't be running the show.

    3.I'm not a Norse scholar. I recommend throwing random words that describe critters into a translator set to Finnish or Swedish.

    4. Make them level 1 warriors and start the PC's at level 3. Have some watch the boat if the party is going to get out of eyesight. Background fight, mooks fight mooks while PC's engage an appropriate challenge of mooks, lieutenants and bosses.
    Last edited by Hand_of_Vecna; 2013-06-09 at 09:19 AM.

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    Pixie in the Playground
     
    Goblin

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by LOTRfan View Post
    Ironguts is a Pathfinder feat that grants a +2 racial bonus to saves made to avoid being sickened/nauseated and a +2 bonus to Survival checks to find food for yourself, but I've never heard of an irongut feat that grants a natural armor bonus.

    Yeah, My bad.. I was thinking Ironhide.

    Ironhide

    Your skin is thicker and more resilient than that of most of your people.

    Prerequisites: Con 13; dwarf, half-orc, or orc.

    Benefit: You gain a +1 natural armor bonus due to your unusually tough hide.

    3.5 version

    Armor Skin [Epic]
    Benefit

    The character gains a +1 natural armor bonus to Armor Class, or his or her existing natural armor bonus increases by 1.
    Special

    A character can gain this feat multiple times. Its effects stack.
    Last edited by Roclat; 2013-06-09 at 09:21 AM.

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    Halfling in the Playground
     
    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    1. How historical is this going to be?
    Because plate didn't exist in the Viking era. As others have pointed out, if you want the flavor, keep the restrictions. They didn't have greatswords, pikes or katana then etiher: think your players will feel restricted for not having them?
    Its not historical at all. I am just using it for the flavor. that being said I think I will agree. Ill disallow the heavy armors and maybe ill give heavy armor classes a better shield option...or some such. Damn homebrew..

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    2. Keep the runecasters almost as they are. It doesn't mesh with the rest of D&D magic, but it's flavorful and fun. Converting the stuff shouldn't take too long. An hour or so for a first draft.

    Something like a cleric: d8 HD, 3/4 BAB, 4 or 6 skill points, a lot of class skills.

    Most of the runes are straight-forward enough. Ale Rune is Detect Poison
    Berserk Rune grants Barbarian Rage (allow it to stack with normal rage), Catch Rune is the Snatch Arrows feat, Change Rune would be a limited Polymorph effect, etc.
    You might want to reconsider the bit about players having no say about what runes they learn. If so, you'll have to assing some level prereqs to some of those runes.

    Other class abilities, spread out over the levels, might be things that are equivalent to metamagic feats: ability to inscribe runes quicker, have them last longer, have them be more effective, ability to make magic items based on the runes, etc.
    A resonable suggestion. I will just have to build the class... more homebrew dammit. Still i seem to recall there are guidelines for custom classes somewhere. Ill just have to look at that. ill check out the mystara while I'm at it. Thank you.

    Heh, you might see my final class design here in not to long...will probably need some tweeking.

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    Halfling in the Playground
     
    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Roclat View Post
    Yeah, My bad.. I was thinking Ironhide.

    Ironhide

    Your skin is thicker and more resilient than that of most of your people.

    Prerequisites: Con 13; dwarf, half-orc, or orc.

    Benefit: You gain a +1 natural armor bonus due to your unusually tough hide.

    3.5 version

    Armor Skin [Epic]
    Benefit

    The character gains a +1 natural armor bonus to Armor Class, or his or her existing natural armor bonus increases by 1.
    Special

    A character can gain this feat multiple times. Its effects stack.
    Appreciate the suggestion but I think Ill avoid this one for now.... I see the epic tag and I run for cover honestly.

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    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Hand_of_Vecna View Post
    1. What conversions do you need? Aside from calling Chainmail Byrnie, those are all PHB armors. I recommend using the Class level based AC from Unearthed Arcana, that will let you technically not have heavy armor while still giving heavy armor classes a leg up in AC. I also recommend using the DR from armor rules on top, having wearing armor give just DR (magical pluses will still be AC).
    My bad, I kinda answered my own question didnt I. Still I would like to use the weight based currency suggested by the Viking campaign book. But I can covert that myself based on armor costs. I think having to deal by weight and wear most of there wealth as jewelry/armbands will help the feel of it along. If it bogs us down ill switch back. i have not seen the alternate rules from UA for AC. Ill take a look at it before I respond to this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hand_of_Vecna View Post
    2. Tell us more about Runecasters, please. Off the top of my head though, I'd say that you probably want casters going off a restricted spell list with some long term buffs, healing, and some weather/nature stuff. This makes me think PF witch(pathfinder srd), Savage Bard(Unearthed Arcana), or Adept(DMG) and I'd steer away from Witch, because this is a setting where high tier casters just shouldn't be running the show.
    "Unlike spells, magical runes do not have levels. Most can be learned by any runecaster no matter what his level. However, some runes can only be attempted after mastering simpler ones. In these cases, the rune or runes that must be known are listed in the description of the particular rune."
    pg 35 of the 2nd edition viking campaign settings. There is a realy long list or I would link them. They have some very nifty effects though. I could make each rune a feat. Like a fighter bonus feats, reduce the BAB to 3/4 drop the hit die and give him extra bonus feats. The bonus feats would be runes or metamagic esque runes only. hmm.....


    Quote Originally Posted by Hand_of_Vecna View Post
    4. Make them level 1 warriors and start the PC's at level 3. Have some watch the boat if the party is going to get out of eyesight. Background fight, mooks fight mooks while PC's engage an appropriate challenge of mooks, lieutenants and bosses.
    Could work. I could roll apposed checks depending on number and work out wounded and dead to give it some authenticity. eek homebrew though. I know there is some real rules for it though somewhere..... maybe it was in the miniatures handbook.

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    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    I have a very Provisional Runecaster. Using the Descriptions from
    http://www.dandwiki.com/wiki/Class_C...(DnD_Guideline)
    I know dandwiki is not a good source. It was all I could find in a hurry. Ill look around more later.

    I used a fighter as a base. Dropped its hit die from a D10 to a D8. got 10 cp
    Dropped Martial Weapons to simple Weapons 5 got cp
    Switched save progression from 1,0,0 to 0,0,1 no cost
    Gave up tower sheilds for 3 cp
    Changed all fighter bonus feats over to rune feats. IE you pick one rune from the list. No cost
    Added the ability to cast in light armor spent 1 cp
    Add class ability:
    1st lvl: Quick Rune Crafting: Instead of 15+1D20 min to craft a rune you can do it in 1 +1D20 rounds (still mostly out of combat but at least its usable out of combat. This gives you unlimited out of combat heals if you want....at the price of around a minute a pop. a minute spent in one place. I might allow taking 10 if your out of a stresful situation)
    cost 2 cp (powerful ability)*4 (1-5th lvl)=8cp
    2nd lvl: Eschew Materials (Runic): Can craft runes on any materials not just the specified. IE rock instead of wood, wood instead of a seal skin.
    cost 1 cp (standard ability)*4 (1-5th lvl)=4cp
    6th lvl: Swift Rune Casting: runes take 1 full round action provoke and concentration checks if damaged/bothered
    cost 2 cp (powerful ability) *2 (6-10th lvl)=4cp
    11th lvl: Runic Air: You can scribe runes on the very air. (You have seen that awesome looking wizard write a symbol on the air in fire haven't you?)
    Cost 1 cp (Normal ability)

    Total Cost is 17 cp.
    +1 for light armor casting
    -10 Hit Die
    -3 Tower Sheild
    -5 Martial to simple
    =0 Final built.

    So in the end we have a fighter using simpler weapons and lighter armor who has out of combat heals (if he picks the limb rune) some fun buffs that last until you run away or loose a duel. And some very powerful situational utility magics. IE shape change into a seal swim under an enemy long boat and inscribe a disease rune on the plank below the sleeping quarters.
    As he levels up he gets progressively faster and less limited in how he uses his runes. I would restrict the multi-classing else my players might do a 2 lvl dip for free heals and shape changing (slow and leave your equipment behind) and walk away. Then again that might not be a bad thing....

    A couple mechanic notes. Crafting a rune is a spellcraft check. The higher you set the spellcraft check the higher the DC as if it were a normal spell. IE 10 +2 x spell level spellcraft check. Max spell lvl is what a wizards max spell lvl would be. Rune Save DC is then 10+X+ attribute where x is the spell level you picked. I adapted this from the ADND wisdom check. It is divine though so I would make it use the wisdom attribute for the spell craft check. The viking campaign book doesn't set any dc's so this was the most reasonable thing i could think up.

    In this campaign any normal person could conceivably learn a rune. They will be a normal feat. The problem is you have to be taught it. And a restriction on rune crafters would probably be they can only teach bound apprentices (they are a suspicious lot and knowledge shared is an advantage lost!) then you would have the full 15 min +1D20 to cast it and the spellcraft check.
    Last edited by Shoelessme; 2013-06-09 at 12:06 PM.

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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Hand_of_Vecna View Post
    1
    3.I'm not a Norse scholar. I recommend throwing random words that describe critters into a translator set to Finnish or Swedish.
    Um, no. Finnish isn't a Northen Germanic language. It isn't even Indo-European. There are better alternatives, like this (which was the first result on a Google search of "english norse"), or asking an Icelanding. Granted, modern Icelandic isn't the same as old Norse, but it's pretty damn close.
    Worst comes to worst, I'll dig up my ON books and take a shot at translating names you need. First off, you'll want to look up the original monsters like "nøkk" or "draug" or "fossegrimm". Some of these, IIRC, are already converted to 3.5. If not, I have some old conversions gathering cyberdust on my hardrive.

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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Shoelessme View Post
    I used a fighter as a base. Dropped its hit die from a D10 to a D8. got 10 cp
    Dropped Martial Weapons to simple Weapons 5 got cp
    Switched save progression from 1,0,0 to 0,0,1 no cost
    Gave up tower sheilds for 3 cp
    Changed all fighter bonus feats over to rune feats. IE you pick one rune from the list. No cost
    Added the ability to cast in light armor spent 1 cp
    Looks good so far.
    1st lvl: Quick Rune Crafting: Instead of 15+1D20 min to craft a rune you can do it in 1 +1D20 rounds (still mostly out of combat but at least its usable out of combat. This gives you unlimited out of combat heals if you want....at the price of around a minute a pop. a minute spent in one place. I might allow taking 10 if your out of a stresful situation)
    I'm not sure about this. Reducing the carving time by this much is rather extreme. Perhaps this ability should come later. After 10th level maybe?


    2nd lvl: Eschew Materials (Runic): Can craft runes on any materials not just the specified. IE rock instead of wood, wood instead of a seal skin.
    sounds good

    6th lvl: Swift Rune Casting: runes take 1 full round action provoke and concentration checks if damaged/bothered
    Again, rather potent. A few levels later, imho.

    11th lvl: Runic Air: You can scribe runes on the very air. (You have seen that awesome looking wizard write a symbol on the air in fire haven't you?)
    This seems so very at odds with the idea of the runes, which are carved on more permanent things. Perhaps something like being able to craft runes out of smoke or vapor, that only last a round or two.

    I would restrict the multi-classing else my players might do a 2 lvl dip for free heals and shape changing (slow and leave your equipment behind) and walk away. Then again that might not be a bad thing....
    Your game, your rules, but IMG I would want to restric this, especially the more true to life I wanted to make it. Remember, Odin hung a long time and paid a dire price for his runes. A quick dip to enhance other things seems like a rather ....easy way to do things.

    Crafting a rune is a spellcraft check. The higher you set the spellcraft check the higher the DC as if it were a normal spell. IE 10 +2 x spell level spellcraft check. Max spell lvl is what a wizards max spell lvl would be. Rune Save DC is then 10+X+ attribute where x is the spell level you picked. I adapted this from the ADND wisdom check. It is divine though so I would make it use the wisdom attribute for the spell craft check. The viking campaign book doesn't set any dc's so this was the most reasonable thing i could think up.
    If runecasting is going to be the only kind of magic around, then fine. If runecasting is going to be set in the same world as other forms of magic, I would use a separate skill for it. Carve Runes or something similar - Wis based rather than Int based, to better fill the flavor of the original.

    In this campaign any normal person could conceivably learn a rune. They will be a normal feat. The problem is you have to be taught it. And a restriction on rune crafters would probably be they can only teach bound apprentices (they are a suspicious lot and knowledge shared is an advantage lost!) then you would have the full 15 min +1D20 to cast it and the spellcraft check.
    This might work. Spending a feat and possibly having to go through some unpleasant sacrifice would be fun. Maybe not hanging on a tree for 9 nights, but something significant that can't be regained with rest or magic (apart from a Wish or something). XP if you are nice, permenent reduction of some sort if you're not.

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    Looks good so far.
    I'm not sure about this. Reducing the carving time by this much is rather extreme. Perhaps this ability should come later. After 10th level maybe?
    I know its extreme but I don't see the magic as usable as it is. Originally the rune carving was used as an extra to a Fighter. Check pg 23 of the viking campaign. They advance as Fighter with all the warrior benefits but they can use runes. The ONLY 2 negatives they received is no Con benefit when they level up and less followers gained at high level. Also while you try to gain runes as you level up its a roll to see if you learn ANY new rune and DM discretion as well. So i changed the hit dice to reflect the Con negative but I just don't see this as a class players would want to play if it takes 16-25 min to cast each spell.

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    Looks good so far.
    This seems so very at odds with the idea of the runes, which are carved on more permanent things. Perhaps something like being able to craft runes out of smoke or vapor, that only last a round or two.
    The runes from the viking campaign are mostly rather temporary things. There are a few that last untill xx happens but most last a maximum of a few hours. A 1th level character is a powerful character. Wizards can teleport at this point, and so much more. I would probably not allow every rune to be written this way. Only the more temporary ones. But I could see the rune written in fire in the very air lasting for several hours. But please continue. This kind of comment is great to make sure im not making them to OP.

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    Your game, your rules, but IMG I would want to restric this, especially the more true to life I wanted to make it. Remember, Odin hung a long time and paid a dire price for his runes. A quick dip to enhance other things seems like a rather ....easy way to do things.
    I tend to agree in theory, but, again from the description in the viking campaign some warriors are gifted a rune just as if they got lucky. Others could spend there lives studying and not learn any. I see this, my opinion, as Odin payed for the runes then gave them to selected mortals with restrictions on there spread. IE only bound apprentices.

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    If runecasting is going to be the only kind of magic around, then fine. If runecasting is going to be set in the same world as other forms of magic, I would use a separate skill for it. Carve Runes or something similar - Wis based rather than Int based, to better fill the flavor of the original.
    There is other magic. The viking campaign book says that other DND magics are mostly foreign magics though. This is the traditional Norse magic. I don't know if I will go that far in my campaign but I do want this to be a strong option. I don't object to another skill though. Profession Runecrafting? that would make it wisdom right off the bat as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    This might work. Spending a feat and possibly having to go through some unpleasant sacrifice would be fun. Maybe not hanging on a tree for 9 nights, but something significant that can't be regained with rest or magic (apart from a Wish or something). XP if you are nice, permanent reduction of some sort if you're not.
    That is definitely reasonable. Or I might grant them a rune after a particular act of heroism as a gift from Odin. I mean the you damn near died for a glorious cause kind of heroism not the, O you won a battle have a freebie.

    I appreciate the thoughts man. Just so you know from my perspective I am trying NOT to create this class wholesale. Im trying to make it a reasonable fun class to play that is still in line with the Original books. That's why I used a warrior. That's why I used one rune ish per level. I did remove the random role to see if you get anything at each level because I don't like a class feature being random. A rune caster with bad luck could never pick up a new rune....I think that would ruin the game for that Player. So instead I made it certain that you get a new rune but you get them at the progresion of a warrior's bonus feats. You could grab extras with your normal feats. All runes are at the DM's discretion still though. That is from the books to and it makes to much sense to ignore.

    Please let me know if this seems like a class you would want to play. And if not suggestions, within the framework of custom classes, to make it one. Or if its OP let me know. I don't see this right now. If anything it looks like some fun utility but not as impressive in combat.
    Last edited by Shoelessme; 2013-06-09 at 11:12 PM.

  17. - Top - End - #17
    Halfling in the Playground
     
    PirateGuy

    Join Date
    Jun 2013

    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    Um, no. Finnish isn't a Northen Germanic language. It isn't even Indo-European. There are better alternatives, like this (which was the first result on a Google search of "english norse"), or asking an Icelanding. Granted, modern Icelandic isn't the same as old Norse, but it's pretty damn close.
    Worst comes to worst, I'll dig up my ON books and take a shot at translating names you need. First off, you'll want to look up the original monsters like "nøkk" or "draug" or "fossegrimm". Some of these, IIRC, are already converted to 3.5. If not, I have some old conversions gathering cyberdust on my hardrive.
    Awesome! One thing I did plan to take over from the old Viking campaign books is their monster makeover. They give you a list of names to put on the same old monsters from the DMG (2nd ed) and some flavor text to make each monster fit into the feel of things. The reason I asked about the other is I wanted to add in some of the fun new races and ideas thought up in later DND and still have them feel right for the campaign.
    Last edited by Shoelessme; 2013-06-09 at 11:23 PM.

  18. - Top - End - #18
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    Beholder

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    1. Check out the Arms & Equipment Guide. It has sone weapons you might like (the harpoon comes to mind) and different armors (and it has boats!).
    Quote Originally Posted by Hans
    Not again...

  19. - Top - End - #19
    Halfling in the Playground
     
    PaladinGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    If you want to keep the historical background of Vikings strictly, you must disallow heavy armors and tower shields...
    Scale mails and chainmails was known in the XIth century and as Northmen plunder all around ancient Europe and Mediterranean Sea, they will have access to Eastern Armor like scale. Breastplate was known since Antiquity so Medium armor is OK.
    Concerning Weapons, it's more difficult to have a lot of different weapons : Broadswords, Bows (non-composite), Spears, Daggers, Axes was the common tools of plundering Northmen... However, They could have access to Scimitars, Falchions in Arabia, but no Kukri or more eastern weapon... Two-Handed sword were not develloped.Crushing Tools like maces, flails, Club and their heavier cousins were common in Europe and Arabia....Crossbow was also a common tool.

    For the Runecaster, Maybe you can have a look in "Races of Stone", there is a PrC you can use to create a class...

  20. - Top - End - #20
    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    For some art inspiration you might want to check out Theodor Kittelsen.
    Granted his stuff is mostly 1000 years too late for for the viking age, but some of the monster art can still work.

    Now, this is stuff I worked on when 3.0 came out, and is not tidied up in any way, so there are likely loads of errors of all sorts here. Also, they were written in a Planescapey style, which probbly won't work if you want a more Norse style. Still, it might give some ideas.



    Norse Dwarves
    Spoiler
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    The Norse dwarves are a race apart from the ones that worship the traditional Dwarven Pantheon (mountain, hill, duergar, derro, etc.).

    The Norse dwarves came about separately. What their origins and whence they came originally is still dark, and if they know they ain’t about to tell.
    Physically, they look much the same as ‘normal’ dwarves, but are less incline to stoutness, and their heights vary more.

    Mostly, it is the cultures and societies that are the greatest difference. Both races are renowned craftsmen and metalworkers of the highest order, but the greatest difference is the type of magic they employ. While standard dwarves have priests and gods of their own, Norse dwarves rarely, if ever, turn to the worship of a god. While they may respect the might of a Power, not to mention their jink, worship is out of the question. Unlike the ‘normal’ dwarves, Norse dwarves are very fond of arcane magic and many are sorcerers, wizards or multiclass with these. Otherwise they are often fighters, with select few barbarians. Monks and rangers are rare, but not unheard of. Paladins, clerics and druids are very rare. Rogues are usually those with an interest in mechanical devices and concentrate their talents to such things rather than sneaking and hiding and pick pocketing. Few are bards, since their nature doesn’t lend itself well to such aesthetic pursuits. Still, the occasional Norse dwarf bard is found, specializing in the ancient lore of the Norse dwarves, and the Norse pantheon and their allies and enemies.

    One puzzling aspect is that few, if any, Norse dwarf females have been heard of. They are never encountered in their halls (by outsiders), never seen, or spoken of. Why? Only the Norse dwarves know, and they aren’t telling.
    The Norse dwarves have a history of creating the biggest and most powerful weapons around. Just where did Thor get Mjølnir? Where did Odin get his spear? The Norse Dwarves, of course.

    Sure, they can’t create things like this right and left. These are major artifacts that even other gods fear. They haven’t created such items in a very long time, leading some to believe that they have lost their ability. Others think that it is because they can’t be bothered to make weapons for every berk that comes along, Power or not. Despite this, they are still sought after as master smiths for ‘lesser’ weapons. If you are fortunate to get hold of a piece of their work, you know that it is worth the price you paid and then some. It will never let you down, and there is often some little extra ability that makes it a truly unique piece.

    Personality:
    The Norse dwarves are a lot more like the stereotypical standard dwarf than most PHB dwarves. On the whole, they are greedy, materialistic, canny and cunning. They are often wicked and unpleasant, caring only for the gleam of gold. They are not so clannish as other dwarves and readily betray their own kind if there is profit is involved. On the other hand, Norse dwarves avenge any wrong done to a member of their family by any outsider. And they use any means necessary to get even.

    There are two factions or clans of dwarves, the Modsogne and the Durin. Named after the two first Norse dwarves created. Modsogne was first, and most powerful, but Durin was the most charismatic and had the greatest following. The two groups rarely live in close proximity, and almost never in the same complexes. The Durin are the ones who make most of the weapons and other items. They sell their work to anyone who has the gold to buy it, regardless of purpose to which it is put. The Modsogne are slightly more cautious and tend more towards non-violent items. Even so, there is little or no disagreement between the two.

    Physical description:
    As noted above, they are very similar to standard dwarves, if slightly less inclined to stoutness. They often have brown, black or red beards and hair. They live slightly longer than standard dwarves, and can reach ages of up to 500 years, even 600 in some very few cases!

    Relations:
    Being very insular and little inclined to socialize with and aliens except in business, the Norse dwarves are disliked or ignored by most other races. With standard dwarves, they share a mutual contempt and while they rarely come to blows over this, they rarely linger in each other’s company.
    Favored classes: at creation, a person can decide whether his character wants to have fighter or sorcerer as a favored class.

    Alignment:
    Norse dwarves are slightly more chaotic than their counterparts. They tend towards neutral and a few chaotic elements. Few care much about good or evil, so long as their purses are full. A few are downright evil, and some very few are good. The good Norse dwarves are somewhat maladjusted to life in their clans, and often leave to go adventuring or settle somewhere else.

    Norse dwarven lands:
    Like standard dwarves, Norse dwarves build mighty underground halls. Few from other races are welcome here unless on business. They are less squeamish about water than standard dwarves, though they do not relish traveling over it. It’s rare to find a single Norse dwarf outside their mountains. It is then almost always on a trading mission, or a courtesy call to discuss possible business relations. They usually travel in pairs or trios.
    Lone Norse dwarves are often outcasts. They will often team up with an adventuring party.

    Religion:
    As noted previously, Norse dwarves have little truck with religion. Some few might enter the service of a member of the Norse pantheon, usually Sif (goddess of excellence in craft), Loki, Thrym (jotun of frost and cold) or Surt (also called Sutr, jotun of fire and flame). Under no circumstances will any Norse dwarf worship the traditional dwarven pantheon, nor will any of those deities take a Norse dwarf as a priest.

    Language:
    The Norse dwarves have their own language that is closely related to Norse. It sounds a bit like standard Dwarven, but has a very different grammar and uses different runes. They also learn Norse and the Norse dialects used by any of their trading partners, usually humans and jotner (Norse giants)

    Names:
    Most of the names that standard dwarves have are also used by the Norse dwarves. Unlike other dwarves, they don’t have clans as such. Therefore they are usually known only by one names, or a last name they have chosen or been given, like Gianttricker, Hammersmith, Lightningaxe or similar names. In addition to the names in the PHB, they have more common Norse dwarf names, like:
    Altjov, Dwalin, No, Nain, Niping, Bivur, Bovur, Oin, Onar, Oe, Mjødvitne, Vigg, Gandalv, Vindalv, Torin, Troh, Troin, Tekk, Fili, Kili, Fundin, Aurvang, Jare, Eikinskjalde. Nye, Nide, Nodre, Sudre, Austre, Vestre, Bombur, Nore, , Lit, Vit, Ny, Nyrod, Regin, Rodsvinn, Nole, Hepte, Vili, Hanar, Sviur, Billing, Brune, Bild, Bure, Froh, Hornbore, Fraegg, Lone

    Adventurers: As noted above, most Norse dwarves don’t bother often with adventuring. Those who do are usually outcasts. They have little knowledge of the Multiverse beyond their own home areas (usually Ysgard and the Norse pantheon, but also certain Prime worlds that are under heavy Norse influence).

    Dwarven racial traits:

    Abilities: Norse dwarves get a +2 bonus to Constitution and a -2 to Wisdom. Though usually gruff and unpleasant, Norse dwarves can be very charming and helpful if they want to. However, their greed and general dislike for others can lead them to do things that aren’t very smart.

    Medium sized: As medium-sized creatures, Norse dwarves have no special bonuses or penalties due to size.

    Norse dwarven base speed is 20 ft.

    Darksight: Norse dwarves can see up to 50 ft. In the dark. Darksight works in the same manner as darkvision but allows the character to see color as well.

    Stonecunning: Norse dwarves are so familiar with stonework that they gain a +2 bonus to notice unusual stonework, like sliding walls, traps, unsafe surfaces, shaky ceilings and new construction and similar. Also stuff that isn’t actually stonework but is made to look like it counts as stonework. A Norse dwarf that merely comes within 10 ft. of unusual stonework can make a check as if actively searching, and the dwarf can use the Search skill to find stonework traps as a rogue can. A Norse dwarf can also intuit depth, sensing his approximate

    Skills: Norse dwarves gain a +2 bonus to all skills related to stonework and metalcrafting.

    Combat: Though they often trade with the jotner (giants), the Norse dwarves also get into a few conflicts with them. Therefore they train special techniques to more effectively battle them. This results in a +2 bonus to both AC and Attack when facing these beings. These bonuses do not count when facing Norse trolls.

    To people who don’t know much about dwarves, a Norse dwarf is indistinguishable from a standard dwarf. The dwarves, on the other hand, instantly spot the difference. The relationship between the two races is polite, but cold and distant. They would just as soon never see each other. Still, the two races can mate and bear offspring, but these are few and far between, even for long-lived dwarves.



    Norse trolls.
    Spoiler
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    Strictly speaking, the word ‘troll’ is given to any big nasty creature a basher wouldn’t like to meet alone at night. There are the common Prime trolls who are stupid and can regenerate, there are the Ysgardian trolls, the Fensir, which are big, intelligent and have little in common with most other sentient races.

    The Norse trolls are different. They come in all shapes and sizes, from the size of your thumb to the size of a mountain. Indeed, a few mountainsides and hills are the worn and overgrow remains of trolls caught by the sun. Ah, the sun. Like the Fensir, they are vulnerable to sunlight, being turned to stone if they are exposed. Strangely, spells like Sunburst and Sunbeam don’t affect them, only the light from a sun.

    In general there are two types of Norse trolls, conveniently labeled the Elder and the Lesser. The Elder are the lesser offspring of the Norse Jotnir (giants/titans). The Lesser are degenerate offspring of the Elder.
    Few see or hear the Elder trolls. Most of what is known of them are ancient songs and legends about them and how they have shaped the local landscape. The Elder were not as powerful as many of the Jotnir, but still had considerable magical powers and intelligence.

    The Lesser, or common troll, are the ones that you will encounter on your journeys. The common troll is 2-3 times larger than your average basher, with brains inversely proportionate smaller. They are big, dumb, and pretty unpleasant berks, but foolish, easily tricked by a canny cutter, and very greedy. Indeed, many of the tales of meetings with ogres and hill giants in the northern reaches of many worlds are actually meetings with Norse trolls.

    In appearance, they resemble ogres, but even more brutish, warty, and foul tempered. They have enormous noses and eyes as big as pools of water. They live solitary lives in mountain caves, or, rarely, with a mate and offspring. Most trolls are male, but the few females are generally better looking and significantly smarter than their counterparts. In either case, their caves are full of treasures taken from earlier victims. They can eat pretty much any type of creature, but are fond of human flesh, and will usually try to eat anybody they come across. They are fearsome fighters, wielding troll-sized versions of greatswords, greataxes and greatclubs with frightening strength. A few also use large steel bows that allow them to take advantage of their exceptional strength.

    Tales abound in rural settings about the smart local boy who many years ago outwitted a troll and took all the gold and silver in the place and went off to marry the king’s daughter. Most of these are apocryphal, but there are always some that contain a grain of truth.

    The basic statistics for ogres and hill giants can be used for an ‘average’ male troll. For slightly stronger and smarter trolls, stats for the other giant types can be used. Or else something like this:


    Special qualities: All trolls are vulnerable to sunlight. If caught in the sun, they turn to stone, or burst and then turn to stone (50% chance of either). Spells that create sunlight do not affect them in this manner, for some reason.



    Varieties:
    As noted above, Norse trolls come in a staggering variety. One of the more common variations of the basic theme there are stats for above, are the multiheaded trolls. They have a number of heads, ranging from 2 to 12. In order to properly kill these type of trolls one must hack off all heads, or else they will merely regenerate damage, similar to the hydra.





    Hulder
    Spoiler
    Show

    Medium fey
    Hit Dice: 5d8 +5 (38)
    Initiative: +2 (dex)
    Speed: 40 ft.
    AC: 13 (+3 natural)
    Attacks: Slam +2
    Damage: Slam 1d4+1
    Face/Reach: 5ft by 5ft. /5 ft.
    Special Qualities: Damage reduction 10/cold iron, charm, trackless step, distract
    Saves: Fort +2, Refl +3, Will +4
    Abilities: Str 12, Dex 14, Con 13, Int 13, Wis 14, Cha 17
    Skills: Bluff+5, Innuendo+7, Hide+5, Move Silently+3
    Feats: Toughness, Lightning reflexes,
    Climate/Terrain: Any land and underground
    Organization: solitary
    Challenge rating: 4
    Treasure: ½ standard (hulder aren’t much interested in such stuff)
    Alignment: Chaotic Neutral
    Advancement:

    The hulder is a fey creature, distantly related to dryads and nymphs. Found in colder climates, they are usually more wicked and cunning than their cousins. In appearance they are female humans or elves of great beauty. This beauty is such that they charm any male human or any animal. Their charmed beings are then taken as slaves, forced to serve the hulder in her barrow. If encountered accidentally (a rare occurrence) they are naked. If encountered when prepared, a far more likely scenario, they are usually dressed in clothes of the type local girls wear. They are charming and witty and try to get the young man to follow her home.

    They have one feature that can prevent their charming attack; they have a tail. The tail looks remarkably like a cow’s tail. Anyone seeing this tail is automatically immune to any charming attempt by this particular hulder.

    They live in underground barrows, the size of a small farm, where they keep their charmed slaves. These barrows are so well hidden in the landscape that they are virtually impossible to find without magic. Finding one requires a Search check in the appropriate area, DC 30. Slaves in her burrow are incapable of breaking the spell, and will serve their mistress with whole-hearted devotion the rest of their lives. If someone manages to find the burrow and bring the charmed beings out, they can make another save every day to break the spell. If the hulder is slain, all charms immediately end.
    Hulder live a ways away from settlements of other beings, but usually no more than a day or so. If the settlement is only one or two small farms, they might live only two or three hours away.

    Hulder are omnivorous but eat lots of meat, usually from charmed animals. They typically get these animals from the normal animals in the woods, or herds of domesticated animals that locals keep.

    Occasionally a hulder will fall in love with a particularly handsome and willful human (Charisma 16+). In this case they enter human society in an unobtrusive manner, and capture his attention by exhibiting behavior that females of that particular culture use to attract the attention of potential mates. In just about every case (few though they have been), the man falls in love with her, and they perform such marriage rituals as are the norm in the vicinity. The union is a happy one, and she loses her tail. Children of these unions are normal in every way, except for a tendency to be smaller and wilder than most other children in the town. Occasionally (1% chance) this magical blood blossoms into a sorcerer. Such sorcerers will typically have mostly, or only Enchantment spells.

    In most cases, however, the hulder mates with one of her slaves, and gives birth to live young. These young are invariably hulder. After 30 or 40 years, the young hulder wanders off to dig her own barrow and start the cycle over again. Contrary to the imaginations and hopes of many males, hulder do not mate for the pleasure of it, nor do they so very often.

    Special qualities:
    Damage reduction: The hulder ignores the first 10 points of damage dealt to her unless the weapon is made of cold forged iron.
    Charm Man or Mammal (Su). The mere sight of a hulder forces any normal animal and male humans, halflings and humanoids make a Will save at DC 15 or be charmed. The charmed being will immediately follow any commands given by the hulder. Dwarves, gnomes and elves are immune to this ability. If the charm doesn’t immediately succeed, she can engage in conversation and attempt again after 1 minute. Unless the subject is very suspicious as to why a beautiful naked woman is alone in the forest and wants to hold a conversation, the second save is DC 20.
    Trackless step (Ex). The hulder never leaves any trace of her passing, be it footsteps (pressure or heat), scent or broken vegetation.
    Distract (Ex): If someone who succeeded his saving throw is attempting to follow a hulder who is fleeing, he will always lose sight of her somehow. Either he trips and falls, or sneezes, or a bird flies into his face, or he meets a bear, etc.

    If combat occurs, the hulder will order all her charmed slaves to obey her and escape. If forced into melee combat, the hulder uses her fists.
    Note, these stats merely represent a typical hulder. There are tales of hulder that are supernaturally strong, able to use fallen logs as clubs when imperiled. Thankfully, these are rare.



    Trollkjerring.
    Medium fey
    Hit Dice: 8d8 +11
    Initiative: +0
    Speed: 30 ft.
    AC: 17 (+7 natural)
    Attacks: Claw +8
    Damage: 1d6 +2
    Face/Reach: 5 ft. by 5 ft./5 ft.
    Special Attacks: Spells
    Special Qualities: Damage reduction 20/cold iron, spells
    Saves: Fort +2, Refl +1, Will +6
    Abilities: Str 15, Dex 10, Con 12, Int 14, Wis 16, Cha 6
    Skills: Bluff +6, Wilderness Lore +5, Hide +8, Move Silently +9, Innuendo +4
    Feats: Toughness,
    Climate/Terrain: Any land and underground
    Organization: solitary
    Challenge rating: 7
    Treasure: Standard
    Alignment: Neutral with evil tendencies
    Advancement:

    If a hulder grows old, 300 years or more, she becomes a trollkjerring. She loses her Charm ability, but gains a number of spell-like powers. She now looks old and wrinkled, a stereotypical witch. Her hair resembles a bird’s nest, and occasionally has moss and lichen growing in it. She gains a taste for human flesh, especially fat little children (so tender that the meat melts in your mouth).

    She still lives in her barrow, but it no longer has any charmed beings. When she needs to eat she must steal the beasts (and humans) by normal means.


    Special Qualities:Spells: The trollkjerring becomes proficient in the use of certain spells. She gains the spell ability of a 6th level sorcerer, but uses her Wisdom as her casting stat.




    Nøkken (nykk)
    Spoiler
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    Large fey
    Hit Dice: 8d6+32 (55)
    Initiative: +2 (Dex)
    Speed: 30 ft.
    AC: 16 (-1 size, +2 Dex, +5 natural)
    Attacks: 2 claws +8 melee
    Damage: 1d6+3
    Space/Reach: 10/10
    Special Attacks:
    Special Qualities: Aura of eerieness, polymorph,
    Saves: Fort +6, Refl +1, Will +4
    Abilities: Str 20, Dex 15, Con 18, Int 11, Wis 14, Cha 13
    Skills: Hide+5, Move Silently +9, Jump +14
    Feats:
    Climate/Terrain: Any lake, river, pond etc.
    Organization: solitary
    Challenge rating: 4
    Treasure: standard
    Alignment: Neutral
    Advancement:

    ‘The nykk lifts up his watery beard,
    and awaits his prey with longing’

    The nøkk is an aquatic fey, a distant relative to both trolls and hulder, that lives in lakes, rivers and ponds. The lakes they prefer are small things, easily swum across by a fairly proficient swimmer. Though accounts vary, most tales say it looks like a large old man with large, luminescent eyes, big ears, long full beard and a shaggy head. Its body is long, angular and bony, but very strong. They are carnivorous and prefer human flesh to all other, but eat mostly animals, wild and domestic.

    The nøkk is used as a bogeyman in many rural settlements. Children are warned not to go in the woods alone, or too close to lakes and ponds, lest they be taken by the nøkk.

    Nøkker (pl) are hermaphroditic, and produce offspring only once every 50 years. The offspring stays about 20 years in the parent’s lake before moving on to their own lake. A nøkk instinctively knows if a body of water is already inhabited by another nøkk, and will move on to another one. They are very long lived, enjoying life spans of up to 600 years, in some cases.


    Special qualities:
    Polymorph (Su): The nøkk can at polymorph into any natural creature or item. It can stay in these shapes as long as it wants to. It could for instance turn itself into a small purse of gold coins to lure someone to it, then revert back to its natural form to grab the person. Each change is a partial action.
    Aura of eerieness (Su): The sight of a nøkk in its natural form is a most disconcerting one. Not quite as overt and powerful as dragonfear, it gives the viewer a sense of unrealness, and inhibits certain actions. For one thing, those first viewing a nøkk must make a Will save DC 13 or stand paralyzed in wonder and horror at the sight of the creature. This lasts 1d6+1 rounds. Even if the save is successful, another one must be made at DC 17 in order to avoid a -3 penalty to all mental ability while viewing the nøkk. All those within 10 feet of the nøkk must also Make a Will save DC 17 or get a -2 penalty to all physical checks, including attack, damage, feat rolls (where applicable), Dexterity checks, Strength checks, Reflex and Fortitude saves etc. Spells or abilities that remove or prevent fear or paralysis, like Remove Fear/Paralysis and other such spells do not have any effect on this ability. Spells or abilities that protect against enchantments and mind-affecting abilities do work against this ability (such as an elf’s resistance).
    Charming tune (Su): Nøkker are proficient musicians and singers, though not nearly as good as their distant relatives, the fossegrimm. In order to lure men and beast to them, they play strange tunes on flutes, harps, lutes or fiddles that draw beings to them in curiosity. Anyone hearing this tune must make a Will save DC 18 or come to the lake and stand entranced by the aura, easy pickings for the nøkk.
    Lake-bond (Ex): The nøkk is bound to his or her lake, and cannot be away from it for long periods of time. If out of contact with the water for more than 24 hours, it starts to dry up and fade, losing 1HD per 24 hours spent away. If returned to the lake, it must stay there for at least 1 hour per HD lost before venturing forth again.

    Combat:
    The nøkker prefer to avoid combat if at all possible, though they are quite capable of taking on most people. If forced into melee combat, they take advantage of their aura of eerieness and rend their opponents with powerful fingers. If things go badly, they will not stick around and allow themselves to be killed. They will usually use their polymorph ability to change themselves into a fast moving animal and vanish in the woods or water.


    Draug
    Spoiler
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    Medium undead
    Hit Dice: 8d12 +9 (58)
    Initiative: +1 (Dex)
    Speed: 30 ft., swim 60 ft. boat 100 ft.
    AC: 15 (+1 Dex, +4 natural)
    Attacks: 2 claws +6 or special
    Damage: 1d6+3
    Face/Reach: 5 ft. by 5 ft./5 ft.
    Special attacks: Omen, control boat, draugslag, draugsleik, draugkyss, draugklyp stunning fist (DC 15)
    Special Qualities: Undead, Damage reduction 5/+1, water mobility,
    Saves: Fort +7, Refl +4, Will +2
    Abilities: Str 15 Dex 13 Con - Int 10 Wis 13, Cha 16
    Skills: Hide +7, Move Silently +6, Jump +5, Intuit Direction +9
    Feats: Stunning Fist, Toughness x3
    Climate/Terrain: ocean
    Organization: solitary
    Challenge rating: 8
    Treasure: nil
    Alignment: Chaotic evil
    Advancement: 9-12 HD Large, 13-16 HD Huge, 17-20 HD Gargantuan, 21-26 HD Colossal

    “Out of storm and mist comes a strange vessel - half a boat. There is only one on board. He resembles a fisherman, but the clothes he wears are strangely old-fashioned - a leather hat and a long leather jacket. Some say that his head is a tangled mass of seaweed, others say that he has no head at all. No one who journeys on the sea wants to encounter him, because he who sails a race with the draug has sailed for the last time.”
    • Folklore from Oftun.

    Draugir (pl) are undead of the ocean. Originally ‘draug’ meant an undead person, but is now used only in connection with the sea-draug. They are rare, and no one is quite sure how they are created. The tendency seems to be when a sailor drowns at sea a draug may occur. Folklore says: “he who meets a watery grave is tossed to and fro by the sea and turns into a draug”. The draug is never the ghost of someone known to those who encounter it, but is always nameless. In all likelihood he is the personification of all the dead who lie adrift in the sea.

    They either appear in the waves alone, or, more often, on a small, partially ruined boat or skiff. The draug has the power to change its shape. In storms and bad weather the fishermen who encounter it in the shape that has already been described. Otherwise it could happen that they ran into him in the guise of a seaweed covered stone, from 1 to 4 feet in diameter.

    The appearance of a draug can vary greatly beyond the standard form described above. Most are medium sized beings, like a normal man, pale-skinned with blue and green tinges, and tangled wet hair. Others are reported to be human sized but lacking a head, or be nothing but a head. In many cases they are covered with seaweed, in their clothes and/or hair. In fact, bearing a seaweed covered stone as ballast in a ship is considered an ill omen, because a draug will take you on the voyage.

    There are some signs that can indicate that a draug is nearby. Abnormal amounts of jellyfish, boats and sea-faring equipment that has been disturbed during the night, putrid smells from the sea and lots of dead fish floating are all indications that draug might be in the area.
    The presence of a draug is bad luck. Poor fishing, sickness, storms, shipwreck and death are common occurrences when a draug is present. Sometimes a person can hear the draug shrieking in the waves, a horribly sound that heralds the coming of a storm, and sometimes the death of someone. The shrieks sound like those of a drowning man.
    Like most undead, the draug has a hatred for all living beings, granted the sweet life that was so cruelly torn from themselves. They are much more subtle than many undead, preferring to cause prolonged terror among their victims rather than immediate death. Though capable of moving on land, they rarely do so, and never more than 100 ft from the water.

    Special abilities:
    The draug has the ability to cause weakness and sickness with its touch. It prefers to use these attacks on someone swimming in the sea. These attacks can also be used as part of the draug’s standard claw attacks. There are 4 different types of special attacks, and each attack may have the same effect or different ones:

    Draugslag (Su): draug-blow, a numbness and paralysis of the struck limb, identical in effect to the spell Paralysis, but permanent until magic is used to reverse the condition. A Fortitude saving throw DC 16 is allowed after 24 hours to shake off the effetc. Otherwise, it are permanent.
    Draugsleik (Su): draug-lick, a large area of raw, painful skin that becomes infected and quickly spreads. Treat this as a Contagion spell. A Fortitude saving throw DC 16 is allowed after 24 hours to shake off the effect. Otherwise, it is permanent.
    Draugkyss (Su): draug-kiss, causes painful swelling sores around the mouth that ooze blood and pus, making a Concentration check necessary when spellcasting (DC 16+spell level), causes 4 Charisma damage. A Fortitude saving throw DC 16 is allowed after 24 hours to prevent the kiss Charisma damage from becoming Charisma drain.
    Draugklyp (Su): Draug-pinch, which causes a lump or swelling that gets worse until the limb is double its normal size and useless. A Remove Curse or Heal cures the limb. A Fortitude saving throw DC 16 is allowed after 24 hours to shake off the effect. Otherwise, it is permanent.
    Omen of Death: A draug can crawl aboard a boat at night, when all the crew is asleep, and fiddle around with the equipment. Someone lying in cover might catch sight of him walking up and down the boat, sitting in all the spots and fiddling with all the equipment, saying “no” “this won’t do” and “not good enough” until it comes to a spot it likes. Then it will lay the oars the wrong way, mess up the nest, tangle the ropes and lay seaweed on the seat. This is a sign that the sailor whose spot it is will die soon, usually at sea. Until a Remove Curse is cast on the unlucky sailor, the chances of something going wrong for him are increased 20-fold, and the results are nearly always fatal. Things like being washed overboard, crushed by a falling beam, falling ill, being killed by a rival etc. (The DM is encouraged to role-play this carefully)
    Control boat (Su): If one or two people are out in a boat, a draug might sneak on board and take control of it. The wind will suddenly pick up, the current will take it farther and farther away from the shore, and nothing the people can do will change the boats course.
    Stunning Fist (Ex): A draug has this feat without the normal requirements.
    Control weather (Su): A draug can control the local weather as per the Control Weather spell, as if cast by a 9th level sorcerer. This ability can be used 1/day.

    Combat:
    A draug prefers to torment seafarers with storms and ‘accidents’ instead of direct confrontation. It might be seen in the storm racing a doomed ship, or conjuring a storm to sink a ship. If forced into physical combat, it will attempt to escape, or get its opponents into the water where it enjoys an advantage over land-dwellers. It will use any spells or supernatural abilities to its best advantage, trying to drown opponents.


    Variants: Some draugir are more powerful than the one described above. They have the powers of sorcerers, levels 1-12. The spells available to it are all in some way connected to the ocean and water and wind. It might be able to summon other sea-dwellers to combat attackers, conjure a whirlwind, capsize a boat, etc. They can draw their spells from the sorcerer/wizard list, cleric list, druid list and Air and Water domains, so long as all spells are in some way related to the sea and the weather.



    Utburd
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    Small undead
    Hit Dice: 4d12 special
    Initiative: +0 or special
    Speed: 20 ft. (special)
    AC: 12 (+2 natural) or special
    Attacks: special
    Damage: special
    Face/Reach: 5 ft. by 5 ft. / 5 ft. or special
    Special attacks: Hold person, invisibility, special
    Special Qualities: undead, polymorph, damage reduction, 20/cold iron, weapon shifting
    Saves: special
    Abilities: special (Str 5, Dex 10, Con -, Int 12, Wis 12, Cha 16)
    Skills: nil
    Feats:
    Climate/Terrain: countryside
    Organization: solitary
    Challenge rating: 5 (varies)
    Treasure: nil
    Alignment: Chaotic neutral
    Advancement: Large 5-10 HD

    The utburd is an undead baby created by a unpleasant tradition practiced occasionally in the countryside. When a woman gives birth to a child she for some reason can’t keep (famine, poverty, youth, deformation of the babe, shame, etc.) the common course of action is to bear it out into the woods to die, hence the name (utburd: carried-out). This is a horrible and shameful act and the mother and all attending the birth keep quiet about this.

    The babe is not given any milk or washing before being carried out, and most importantly, not a name; otherwise it is considered murder.
    Utburd are killed in many different ways. The most common is to lay it in a hollow and leave them to starve to death or be eaten by wild animals. In many a number of cases, the babes have been found by people with better means and taken in. Others are never found, or if so they are left there.
    Other times they are suffocated, strangled, stabbed or have their necks wrung. This will often create an undead babe. In the night or alone in the woods they will wail and cry. These spirits are tormenting spirits in the truest sense of the word. It hates all life, and can inflict sickness on people, it pursues them along the roads. In particular, it searches for its mother.

    The utburd is known for its piercing cries, and is for this reason often called ‘ropar’ (crier) or ‘gast’ (ghost). These words are also names for owls, a bird whose shape the utburd often takes, shrieking throughout the night.
    In appearance, the utburd varies greatly, not only counting the shapes it can take with its polymorph ability. Some are tiny naked children, others are throatless humans with sheep-hooves, other times a large black wolf.

    The utburd isn’t dangerous immediately after creation. It usually ‘grows’ about five years, give or take, before becoming active. Before this time it merely haunts the night with its cries. Once it ‘matures’ it is a significant danger to wanderers on the roads and in the woods. It will only attack lone characters, but it will use its shrieks and cries to disconcert large parties. It might follow a party along the road, shrieking and wailing, always staying out of sight. This can be very unpleasant.

    Though an utburd will attack anybody, it is most interested in its mother. It instinctively knows its mother and will attack her if at all possible. Their aim is to kill their mother to right the terrible wrong committed. The method of killing varies. One woman was found with her eyes gouged out and strangled, another was found with the utburd at her breast, having sucked her blood until she died. Others have been trampled, gutted, had their heads torn off; everything imaginable.

    Special abilities:
    The powers and appearance of utburds can vary, but these are some common powers.
    Hold person (Su): the sight of an utburd in its natural form is so horrifying that a person seeing it must make a Will save DC 16 or be paralyzed, as per the Hold Person spell, as cast by an 8th level sorcerer.
    Imitation (Ex): the utburd can mimic the sound of any animal. This is usually used to either disconcert humans, or to lure them into the woods (for instance by imitating a lost cow).
    Polymorph (Su): They are capable of polymorphing into many different shapes, favorite ones being owls, ravens and small whirlwinds (about 3 feet across and 8 feet high). The whirlwind has no special attacks, but can move at 60 ft a round. In this form it is not affected by any spells or weapons or turning, except as noted in the Combat section.
    Invisibility (Sp): The utburd can become invisible at will
    Weapon shifting (Su): Attacking an utburd in its natural form, whirlwind form or cling form (see below) is a hazardous thing. All attacks are turned on the attacker. For instance, if a fighter attacks an utburd, the player must roll attack and damage against his own character. The only way to successfully attack an utburd is to hold the weapons the wrong way (e.g. holding a dagger by the blade and stabbing with the hilt). This inflicts normal damage. Spells work normally.

    Variant powers:
    In addition to, or instead of, the ones mentioned above, some utburd might have one or more of these.
    Size alteration (Su): the utburd can at will change its size, from that of a flea to that of a giant. If forced into combat it will often take giant size in order to take advantage of greater strength, AC, attack bonus and hit points (equal to a hill giant’s). Feats, skills and other abilities are not gained.
    Draining blow (Su): like a shadow, an utburd can drain the strength of an opponent on a successful touch. This drains 1 point of strength, with a Fortitude save DC 16 to avoid. Lost strength returns at a rate of 1 point per day.
    Cling (Su): the utburd can jump on the back of a victim and make itself heavy, dragging the victim to the ground. Using this attack the utburd is incorporeal, feeling like nothing more than a ice-cold shadowy presence, making ones limbs freeze and stiffen , dragging one to the ground. The first round the victim must make a Strength check DC 7 to keep mobile. If successful, the victim can still move about normally, but cannot shake the utburd off. Every round beyond the first, the DC increases by one until the utburd is either driven off or has dragged the victim to the ground and immobilized it. Once this is done, it kills the victim. In order to cling a victim, it must jump on the victim’s back and make a successful touch attack. The victim gets to make a Reflex save DC 16 to avoid the attack. If the utburd is driven away before it can kill the victim, the victim is unhurt but for bone white claw marks on his chest and shoulders. In this form, the utburd appears to be a small shadowy, spectral child clinging to the victim’s back..

    Combat:
    The utburd only attacks single people. They can be tracked down and confronted by a group. In this case they will usually retreat unless the people are weak enough to be easily defeated.

    If destroyed in combat the utburd disappears for a year or so before returning. To permanently destroy an utburd its body, or remains thereof, must be found and given a proper funeral rite, whatever is the norm for the culture the mother was. If the utburd catches and kills its mother, it will also be laid to rest.

    Names have power, as anyone dealing with powerful fiends and undead knows. The utburd not only wishes to kill its mother, it also longs for a name. In its desperation to be named, it will misinterpret what a person says to be a name.

    Here is a tale illustrating the point:

    “In Reindeer Gap in Holset, there was said to have been an utburd. There was a girl who’d had a child, but she didn’t want anyone to know about it, so she killed the child and lay it under some rocks in the Gap. Afterwards strange cries were heard in the Gap. This was probably because the dead creature was unable to come to rest, since it had been murdered by its mother, and didn’t even have a name. But no one knew this, and the people thought it was a hulder that was crying instead.
    Now it happened one evening that a flock of girls went past the Gap, and in the flock was the mother of the utburd. They heard a horrible shrieking, much louder than ever heard before. Frightened, they hurried past, but the shrieking followed them. In desperation, the mother shouted ‘Shut up, brat!’. Straightway a horrible laughter was heard and then the voice said ‘My mother calls me ‘Brat!’’ The girls heard this and became suspicious. Later the mother confessed everything.”

    Anyone confronting the utburd and naming it can keep it from killing them. In some cases, naming the utburd is enough to lay it to rest, in others it merely ceases to be a threat to people, though it still haunts the area of its death and cries mournfully in the night.
    In any case, utburd are rare and it is unheard of for an area to have more than one in its entire history, much less at a time.



    Deildegast
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    Medium undead
    Hit Dice: 4d12+3 (27)
    Initiative: +0
    Speed: 30 ft.
    AC: 13 (incorporeal)
    Attacks: 2 slams +4
    Damage: 1d4+special
    Face/Reach: 5 ft. by 5 ft./5 ft.
    Special attacks: chilling blow
    Special Qualities: Undead, Incorporeal
    Saves: Fort +4 Refl +4 Will +4
    Abilities: Str - Dex 10 Con - Int 11, Wis 12 Cha 10
    Skills: na
    Feats: Toughness
    Climate/Terrain: any land
    Organization: solitary
    Challenge rating: 3
    Treasure: nil
    Alignment: neutral
    Advancement: na

    In the North, land is at a premium. Among hostile neighbors of various undead, fey and trolls, and landscape feature like mountains, fjords and rocky slopes, good land is hard to come by. Therefore a number of people have been tempted to move the boundary stones (deild) between their farm and the neighboring farm a little, giving them more arable land.

    Sometimes this nags their conscience so much that when they die they are bound to this plane and try vainly to atone for this deed by replacing the deild. However, they are prevented from this by a number of factors. One, death often blurs the mind, and they cannot remember where the deild are. When they finally find the right one(s) they are incapable of lifting it/them. Often a special curse is laid upon a deild at its laying:
    “He who lifts this deild so high that the sun shines underneath it shall forever be doomed to wander the night,” is an example of a curse.

    In appearance they are spectral apparitions that look like they did at the time of death, often an old stooped man with plain farming clothes on, bearing a torch or a lantern, wandering the farms trying to find the deilds. If he has by any chance found the stone, he spends his time trying to lift and carry it, a Sisyphean labor. In the latter case, the deild glows with an unearthly light.

    The lantern/torch/deild looks much the same as a will-o-wisp, giving off an eerie spectral glow.

    The deildegast is not violent, but a pathetic character searching for release from this undeath. If attacked, the deildegast will attack with two chilling hands. Characters struck by the hands must make a Fortitude save or lose 1 point of Strength and Constitution. Lost points return at the rate of 1 per day (player’s choice of whether Str or Con). If destroyed in combat, the deildegast dissipates, but returns 3 nights later. The only way to permanently put one to rest is to find the displaced deild and carry it back to the proper place.

    The deildegast is incapable of communication at first. If encountered by non-hostile people, it will merely give them a mournful look and keep looking for the deild(s). If three consecutive nights are spent in its company, it learns to communicate with the people. It then begs pitifully for help in reaching the proper afterlife. If the person(s) agree to help it, they must bear the misplaced deilds back to their proper places. If this is done, they gain the normal XP for defeating the deildegast. In addition, each person that helped gains a special fortune: one time later in their life they can automatically succeed at a task, be it creating an item, making an attack, succeeding a save or avoiding a spell or blow that otherwise would have killed them. The player can decide when to use this boon.



    Oskorei
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    Colossal undead

    The Celts have the Wild Hunt. The dwellers in the North have the Oskorei. Unlike the Wild Hunt, the Oskorei is not a divine event, but a horrid procession of undead spirits. Some have thought the name comes from ‘aasgaardreid’ or ‘Asgard-ride’, which would mean that this was a host of spirits sent from Asgard. This is not true. The word ‘oskur’ means terror, so Oskorei means ‘terrifying host’

    The Oskorei appears as a spectral cloud that flies over the land at incredible speeds. If one looks carefully in the cloud one can see many riders. They are comprised of all sorts, men and women, old and young, warriors, farmers, craftsmen; all tearing across the sky and land in a never-ending race. At the head rides Guro, the mistress, with her husband Sigurd. Guro is a large and hideous woman, reminding one more of a troll than a human. She rides about on her horse Skokse, a large black mare that to all appearances is a nightmare, though no one has yet confirmed or denied this. Sigurd is a small man of such decriptetude and infirmity that he has to have help opening his eyes. He rides the stallion Grane, that seems in little better shape than him, despite the fact that it keeps up with the rest of the host. The others ride all manner of beings, from beetles to dogs to ravens to empty barrels! Most ride horses, however.

    The actual background of the Oskorei is dark. Rumors abound. The most popular ones are these:
    They are spirits sent out from Asgard to torment the Multiverse. Whether there is one that travels throughout the Multiverse or whether there is one per world, with a couple extra to flit about Ysgard, no one knows, but the leaders of the host have been described as other beings than Guro and Sigurd, something that may lend credence to the multiple-host theory.

    Another rumor is that they somehow tricked some high-up, and in turn he cursed them. Of course, this rumor is an explanation for many things that no one can explain.

    The Oskorei is a very powerful entity. Despite the many beings that comprise it, the oskorei is considered to be a single entity for all combat and communication purposes.
    Its behavior is highly chaotic, following the whims of Guro. Sometimes it might pursue travelers, pelting them with pine cones and lumps of dirt, but nothing lethal. Other times it will grab a person’s spirit and take them on a ride around the land, returning the spirit at sunrise. Yet other times they will descend on some poor sod and tear him to shreds in less time than it takes to read about it.

    Combat:
    The Oskorei, being a unique and extremely powerful gathering, is extremely difficult to combat effectively and impossible to destroy. There are stories of Abyssal lords who have attempted this and failed. In all probability, nothing less powerful than a full-fledged deity is capable of permanently laying the Oskorei to rest. As yet, none have tried.
    Last edited by BWR; 2013-06-10 at 05:30 AM.

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    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Yondu View Post
    If you want to keep the historical background of Vikings strictly, you must disallow heavy armors and tower shields...
    Scale mails and chainmails was known in the XIth century and as Northmen plunder all around ancient Europe and Mediterranean Sea, they will have access to Eastern Armor like scale. Breastplate was known since Antiquity so Medium armor is OK.
    Concerning Weapons, it's more difficult to have a lot of different weapons : Broadswords, Bows (non-composite), Spears, Daggers, Axes was the common tools of plundering Northmen... However, They could have access to Scimitars, Falchions in Arabia, but no Kukri or more eastern weapon... Two-Handed sword were not develloped.Crushing Tools like maces, flails, Club and their heavier cousins were common in Europe and Arabia....Crossbow was also a common tool.

    For the Runecaster, Maybe you can have a look in "Races of Stone", there is a PrC you can use to create a class...
    I appreciate the help btw. I had pretty much come to a similar conclusion with armor. No heavy armors available. I have some idea's on what to give classes that lose out to this but since that would be straight home-brew ill not offend sensibilities by putting that here. I despise some of the D&D descriptions for weapons anyway, Falchion in particular.
    "A falchion (/ˈfɔːltʃən/; Old French: fauchon; Latin: falx, "sickle") is a one-handed, single-edged sword of European origin, whose design is reminiscent of the Persian scimitar and the Chinese dao" Wikipedia
    So if someone wants to do some research and say I want XXXX weapon and it was used around that time ill just find the closest weapon to it in the PHB and flavor text it. There are a ton of fun weapons in European history and if you want to describe a weapon as one of those more power to you.

    As for the races of stone. I do love that book. Ill take a look at it. So far though nothing captures the feel of the runecrafter from 2ed viking campaign.

    As an aside. From earlier eara's if you want to use a 2 handed sword you could go with the 2 handed falx, the latin is the falcata. It had a wooden handle a third longer (ish) then the blade to make up for the poor quality of the blade but it was used like a sword not a polearm. It was effective enough that the roman military had to change there armor to deal with it.

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    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by BWR View Post
    For some art inspiration you might want to check out Theodor Kittelsen.
    Granted his stuff is mostly 1000 years too late for for the viking age, but some of the monster art can still work.
    I appreciate the art link man. Could you do me a small favor and put most of that text under a spoiler section? Its a little intimidating as you scroll past it . I apreciate the rest of it to but I think ill pass on some of it. Im going to make life easier on myself and use the combination DMG/ viking sourcebook. The viking sourcebook provides nordic names for monsters and there standard monster name. Cut paste and walla nordic monsters. As for the dwarves. I have plans for the Nibelung. Oh yes I do..... <cackle>

    Edit: thank you for doing that
    Last edited by Shoelessme; 2013-06-10 at 06:59 PM.

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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    You can, if you want, refluff the armour table. Full plate is renamed chain mail, breastplate is renamed chain shirt, and chain shirt is renamed leather armour. You may want to add things like 'light leather' for those who want armour without ACP. Just three or four kinds of armour, the kinds people use anyway.
    My D&D 5th ed. Druid Handbook

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    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by hymer View Post
    You can, if you want, refluff the armour table. Full plate is renamed chain mail, breastplate is renamed chain shirt, and chain shirt is renamed leather armour. You may want to add things like 'light leather' for those who want armour without ACP. Just three or four kinds of armour, the kinds people use anyway.
    Interesting idea. I don't think ill go there though. Its one thing to rename a greatsword as a claymore or flamberge. After all thats kind of what they are. Describe a Martel de fuer as a war hammer. because again thats what it is, just with a pick axe head on the other side. Renaming something though to something else that already exists would make it really confusing over time. I think I might transfer the heavy armor proficiancy to the Ultimate Sheild Proficiancy from the races of stone. They get medium armor and a Ultra-Heavy shield instead. This would even work with the history because the sheild sized were actually quite variable. I can check the numbers to see if that works out in average AC. The second benefit is you can drop the shield in the water to get rid of the armor check penalty. Which would work great for a mostly sea campaign and you don't worry about sleeping in it. (Course you lose the shield but hey whats most important?)

    Edit: its called an extreme shield not ultimate.
    Last edited by Shoelessme; 2013-06-10 at 05:55 AM.

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    Spiryt's Avatar

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Yondu View Post
    If you want to keep the historical background of Vikings strictly, you must disallow heavy armors and tower shields...
    Scale mails and chainmails was known in the XIth century and as Northmen plunder all around ancient Europe and Mediterranean Sea, they will have access to Eastern Armor like scale. Breastplate was known since Antiquity so Medium armor is OK.
    Concerning Weapons, it's more difficult to have a lot of different weapons : Broadswords, Bows (non-composite), Spears, Daggers, Axes was the common tools of plundering Northmen... However, They could have access to Scimitars, Falchions in Arabia, but no Kukri or more eastern weapon... Two-Handed sword were not develloped.Crushing Tools like maces, flails, Club and their heavier cousins were common in Europe and Arabia....Crossbow was also a common tool.

    For the Runecaster, Maybe you can have a look in "Races of Stone", there is a PrC you can use to create a class...
    For the record, breastplate were used in antiquity, but there's no evidence whatsoever that their use continued. They were mostly bronze.

    It does seem that second 'invention' of more or less 'proper' breastplate didn't happen before early 14th century at least.

    There were no 'scimitars' and 'falchions' in Arabia then, anyway.

    Sabres and curved swords in general were popular among steppe people from Magyars to Avars, so there's some possibility of some 'viking' having one.
    Avatar by Kwarkpudding
    The subtle tongue, the sophist guile, they fail when the broadswords sing;
    Rush in and die, dogs—I was a man before I was a king.

    Whoever makes shoddy beer, shall be thrown into manure - town law from Gdańsk, XIth century.

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    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Spiryt View Post
    For the record, breastplate were used in antiquity, but there's no evidence whatsoever that their use continued. They were mostly bronze.

    It does seem that second 'invention' of more or less 'proper' breastplate didn't happen before early 14th century at least.

    There were no 'scimitars' and 'falchions' in Arabia then, anyway.

    Sabres and curved swords in general were popular among steppe people from Magyars to Avars, so there's some possibility of some 'viking' having one.
    Interesting thing history. I dont know when the scimitar became popular in Arabia but I did read a bit on falchions.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falchion
    Some cool info in here if your curious about it. This is the wrong place to get in an argument over it though.
    On the breastplate your probably right. iron didnt make the best breastplates. BUT the roman banded mail, lorica later lamellar, was still in use and was found:
    "Lamellar [edit]
    More than thirty lamellae (individual plates for lamellar armour) were found in Birka, Sweden, in 1877, 1934 and 1998-2000.[28] They were dated to the same approximate period as the Gjermundbu mailshirt (900-950) and may be evidence that some Vikings wore this armour, which is a series of small iron plates laced together or sewed to a stout fabric or leather cats shirt. There is considerable debate however as to whether the lamellae in question were in the possession of a Scandinavian resident or a foreign mercenary."

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    PirateGuy

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    For a more polished look at my transfer of the 2e Runecaster to 3.5 here. Note that I compleatly invented the faster runecrafting mechanic in an effort to make this a usable class. Please let me know if it is resonable.

    Runecrafter
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    Flavor:
    Anyone can craft a rune. If they can learn a rune in the first place. This is not common. Odin is said to have hung from the world tree with his spear in his side for days without food or drink in order to learn the secrets of the runes. A runecrafter is one of a long, and select, chain of mortals who have passed down scraps of Odin's knowledge through the ages. Whether he gifted this, it was stolen from him, or something else entirely. This magic is divine but it does not depend on a God to cast it. It comes from an understanding of the truth behind the world that is not mutable. These are the words of creation. The words that brought the world into being and that govern its existence. This knowledge is not passed on widely or freely. Any Potential Runecrafter must apprentice himself to a Master. He shall be bound with a Geis not to share his knowledge except to a bound apprentice of his own, and that only after his master has passed on. It also prevents students from deliberately harming there masters (No you cant kill him then teach your friends your tricks).

    Restrictions:
    A runecrafter who multi-classes has shown insufficient dedication to his craft and will not receive any more training from his master without severe restitution.
    Mechanically, if you multi-class you will no longer have access to reliable training in new runes. If he leaves to early, at least lvl 6?, he might also be cursed by the Nith (ni and an o with a hook on top) rune pg 38 of the viking campaign settings. New runes can be acquired outside your master but they are rare and not guaranteed.

    Alignment: Any
    Hit Die D8
    Class Skills:
    The Runecrafters’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Climb (Str), Craft (Int), Profession: Seamanship (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Spellcraft/Profesion (Runecrafting)/Knoledge (Wis), and Swim (Str).
    Weapon and Armor Proficiency
    A fighter is proficient with all simple weapons, and long swords, and with light armor and shields not including tower shields.

    Bonus Feats
    At 1st level, a Runecrafter gets a bonus runecrafting-oriented feat in addition to the feat that any 1st-level character gets and the bonus feat granted to a human character. The Runecrafter gains an additional bonus feat at 2nd level and every two Runecrafter levels thereafter (4th, 6th, 8th, 10th, 12th, 14th, 16th, 18th, and 20th). These bonus feats must be drawn from the feats noted as Runecrafter bonus feats. A fighter must still meet all prerequisites for a bonus feat, including ability score and base attack bonus minimums.

    These bonus feats are in addition to the feat that a character of any class gets from advancing levels. A Runecrafter is not limited to the list of Runecrafter bonus feats when choosing these feats.

    Skills: Use pathfinder skill sheets /w a talk with the DM for the differences for prestige classes this brings
    Skills per level: int+2 (Remember pathfinder gives a +3 bonus to any class skill you have at least 1 rank in and no double cost for no class skills)

    Level BAB Fort Ref Will Special
    1st +1 +0 +0 +2 Bonus feat, Runic Apprenticeship
    2nd +2 +0 +0 +3 Bonus feat, Eschew Materials (Runic)
    3rd +3 +1 +1 +3
    4th +4 +1 +1 +4 Bonus feat
    5th +5 +1 +1 +4
    6th +6/1 +2 +2 +5 Bonus feat, Runic Journeyman
    7th +7/2 +2 +2 +5
    8th +8/3 +2 +2 +6 Bonus feat
    9th +9/4 +3 +3 +6
    10th 10/5 +3 +3 +7 Bonus feat
    11th 11/6/1 +3 +3 +7 Runic Air
    12th 12/7/2 +4 +4 +8 Bonus feat
    13th 13/8/3 +4 +4 +8
    14th 14/9/4 +4 +4 +9 Bonus feat
    15th 15/10/5 +5 +5 +9 Runic Mastery?
    16th 16/11/6/1 +5 +5 +10 Bonus feat
    17th 17/12/7/2 +5 +5 +10
    18th 18/13/8/3 +6 +6 +11 Bonus feat
    19th 19/14/9/4 +6 +6 +11
    20th 20/15/10/5 +6 +6 +12 Bonus feat, Runic Mastery?

    Runic Apprenticeship: Instead of 15+1D20 min to craft a rune you can do it in 1 +1D20 rounds. You are not just following a complex formula but have begun to see imperfectly the reasons behind the formula.
    Eschew Materials (Runic): Can craft runes on any materials not just the specified. IE rock instead of wood, wood instead of a seal skin.
    Runic Journeyman: runes take 1 full round action provoke and concentration checks if damaged/bothered. You have seen farther into the lines of governance of this world and can use some of this knowledge quicker.
    Runic Air: You can cut a rune in to the fabric of the world. The rune will stay in place glowing for the duration of the spell. If it would last for more than 1 day it ends after the first 24 hours. (Dispel rules are standard)
    <I don't have any creation points left unless the multi-classing restriction gives me some. Which i think it does for paladins. So Perhaps>
    Runic Mastery: Can now craft a rune as a swift (lvl 20)/standard action (lvl 15). You can see clearly and deeply into the lines of governance of this world.

    To craft a rune you must first decide at what spell level you are casting/crafting it at. this is a maximum of a wizard spell level at your same level. Then make a Spelcraft/Profesion/Knoledge check =10+2*spell level. Spell level determines the save DC against it DC=10+Spell Level +Wis. Failing the check can mean it doesn't work OR it can have a bad effect as per each runes description. (the love spell can become a disease if you mess it up)

    Yes I striped some of the +'s off to try to make it line up...I failed

  28. - Top - End - #28
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Agent 451's Avatar

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    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Shoelessme, I don't know if you have seem any of these, but Avalanche Press put out several Viking themed sourcebooks and adventures for 3.0. These include: Greenland Saga, Ragnarok!, Doom of Odin, and Viking Age. They might be of some use to you, and you can sometimes still find them at used bookstores and gaming shops.
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    Link/Triforce and Reinhard von Lohengramm avatars by the talented Kymme!

  29. - Top - End - #29
    Halfling in the Playground
     
    PirateGuy

    Join Date
    Jun 2013

    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    Quote Originally Posted by Agent 451 View Post
    Shoelessme, I don't know if you have seem any of these, but Avalanche Press put out several Viking themed sourcebooks and adventures for 3.0. These include: Greenland Saga, Ragnarok!, Doom of Odin, and Viking Age. They might be of some use to you, and you can sometimes still find them at used bookstores and gaming shops.
    Wow, thank you so much. I didnt know about them. I have been trying to covert the 2ed to 3.5. This will make my life so much easier. Thank you again.

  30. - Top - End - #30
    Orc in the Playground
     
    BardGirl

    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Denmark

    Default Re: 2nd ed Viking Conversion to 3.5

    01 - Armor
    I agree that the characters should be able to find some full plate if they really want to. Its a game after all.
    A nitpick, no one would wear armor at sea, or anytime out of battle. They were working people, who sometimes did battle.


    03 - For the language bit:
    Most Scandinavian countries claim to be the "true" vikings, of cause this is both true and false for all of them (except for the Danes who are the true vikings ). No one speaks old nordic anymore, but Icelandic is probably the most original if you want to Google Translate some words.


    04 - The NPC crew
    The vikings were not opposed to slaves, called thralls ("trælle"), you could have a significant portion of the crew be thralls who would not be trusted to fight. The rest of the warriors of the ship could be mostly on guard duty, rear guard and so on.
    A ship with a crew of 20 is a fine ship of good size. If the characters are not famous raiders and leaders, they might even have trouble finding 20 free men to join them. Remember, sailing out into the unknown is a dangerous business, you may be lost at sea forever or worse, you might be eaten by the Jormungand (the serpent that literally surrounds the world)

    Oh, and please, for the love of Odin, no horned helmets
    Quote Originally Posted by Incorrect View Post
    If you consider the RP aspect, you might want to consider alternatives to Tortle Str Ranger.
    I mean, why would the rest of the party trust this Tortal StRanger...

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