Support the GITP forums on Patreon
Help support GITP's forums (and ongoing server maintenance) via Patreon
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. - Top - End - #1
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    gr8artist's Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Homebrew
    Gender
    Male

    Default The Witherlands Campaign (advice desired)

    Italicized portions are dialogue and explanations. Feel free to skip if you don't have the time.

    Gruber, KO, Sami, Tyrson, Zajas, Zainen... anyone who's ever played a campaign with me (or may play in the near future) needs to not read this thread, due to spoilers.
    Anyone wishing to participate in my PBP version of this campaign needs to also not read this thread, due to aforementioned spoilers.

    Intro
    Hello. I'm one of those practical, visual/kinetic type problem solvers. If I simply ponder something without writing it down, I just go in circles. I'm trying to develop a world and campaign setting for my group, and I think I'd accomplish more with advice and critiques. Obviously I can't go to my group for help, so I thought I'd take a stab at getting support here.
    I've had a few other threads working out single concepts, balance fixes, new mechanics, etc... but I need to consolidate all that information into one place. Putting it online makes it easily accessible from anywhere, makes getting advice and assistance faster and easier, and allows me to work on it in a tab-type format, without having to open Microsoft Word (or an equivalent program).
    I'm going to list my ideas as I work on them, pulling them from the half-dozen notebooks I've been jotting down in, categorized by type. Comments, commentary, and dialogue from me will be italicized, to distinguish hypothetical conversations, notations and the like from my intended game rules and concepts. That being said, let's begin.


    The Witherlands
    The name "Witherlands" refers to all territories on the land mass west of the Charibdian Sea. The early majority of the campaign will take place in a relatively large portion of the Witherlands, known as the Great Plains, which includes roughly 8 different cities or towns. South of the Great Plains, there lies the Blackmire, a lawless zone home to vicious monsters and more vicious men. The Witherlands are so named because of a foul miasma that came from across the sea and destroyed most of their plant life. Plants withered and wasted away, but did not die, and continued to grow in ghostly colorless shades and twisted, unnatural forms.
    The effects of this miasma are extensive.
    • The air and water are toxic, causing a strange affliction in those that remain exposed to them for too long. Plants which grow in polluted regions are toxic as well, as are the animals which feed off them. Fortunately, most predators have developed a resistance to the toxins in their prey; the meat of carnivores is less likely to cause illness than the meat of herbivores.
    • The miasma obstructs the sky, blocking the view of all but the brightest stars, and giving the sun an eerie indigo-violet hue. Creatures vulnerable to sunlight suffer no penalties from the natural sun, though spells like daylight affect them normally. All natural light is reduced by one step, so normal light at noon, dim in the mornings and afternoon, and dark for 16 hours a day.
    • The miasma twists the nature of magic that flows within its reach. Casting spells while within the miasma requires succeeding at a spell resistance check at a relatively low DC. Rituals (described later) are performed in such a way as to ignore this "environmental SR."
    Because of the inherent danger present from the miasma, colonies were formed in caves and caverns, as a way to escape from its clutches. Such colonies often have strong barriers and enchantments to keep the illness at bay, or to at least weaken its effects. Since few are willing to risk their life travelling through toxin-infested wastelands unless absolutely necessary, most inter-colony communication and trade have come to an end. The exception to this are trade caravans from Horvos, and the nomadic tribes of Garl, which use anti-miasmic rituals to set up encampments with relative safety. With so little cross-cultural communication, each community has developed its own drastically different culture. Languages are regional at best, and even the same language can sound drastically different to those who speak a different dialect.
    The Witherland colonies are:
    Spoiler: Thoros
    Show
    Thoros, the fortress buried in the north-western foothills. The people of Thoros respect skill and devotion above all else, and are renown for their bravery, generosity, talents and craftsmanship.
    Thorans are divided by their Devotions, which serve as philosophy and inspiration. Young Thorans may intern with any Devotion they desire, but are encouraged to master the skills and talents of the Devotion they eventually choose. They believe in only one deity, a wicked trickster god of luck, who is constantly struggling in a spiritual war against their benevolent ancestors and masters.
    Citizens of Thoros give willingly to their friends and allies, and rarely require a trade or compensation. Deals in Thoros are often made by the exchange of "favors," small metal tokens depicting the mark of a trained master. Each favor is worth one simple task or common item from that master. Favors are hard to come by, and are usually given as a reward for a job well done.
    Spoiler: Garl
    Show
    Garl, the only above-ground colony, is divided into tribes and clans which roam about the surface, hunting and raiding as they please. In the center of their territory, to the west of most other colonies, lies a ruined castle, which serves as a yearly gathering place where all tribes come together to exchange knowledge and youths who are inclined for a different path than the tribe they are born into. The people of Garl are feared for their merciless outlook on life and their reckless lust for battle.
    The tribes of Garl are divided by totem animals, which represent primal aspects they wish to emulate. They honor ancestral and animal spirits in place of gods, though they believe in demons that would influence them to unnatural perversions and behaviors.
    Though they shy away from traditional methods of commerce, the warriors of Garl will occasionally trade the spoils of their victories with well-defended outsiders. Unarmed and inadequate caravans are normally raided and sacked, while stronger encampments meet a warmer welcome. Garlians are eager to trade for weapons, medicines, and any spiritually significant talismans that had been stolen from them.
    Ancestral fingerbones inscribed with family runes are a favorite source of luck and mystical power, and fetch a good price from the warriors of that family or tribe.
    Spoiler: Ro'kas
    Show
    Ro'kas, a cesspool of depravity on the border of the Great Plains and the Blackmire. The people of Ro'kas idolize their own nature, indulging in sin and misguided zeal so deeply that most other cultures loathe them.
    Most Ro'ka stand alone as unaligned and unaffiliated with any sub-sect or grouping, though they do value certain aspects of humanistic nature. Priests and petitioners undergo extensive self-mutilation in their perverse faith, and often gather into small cults of worshipers suffering though the same trials. Such cults are themed around their focus, such as Lust, Pride, and Wrath, and they share knowledge of their torments with those who follow their path. Ro'ka seek perfection in themselves, in order to emulate a great leader of their past who has now been elevated to a god-like status. Ro'ka believe in no common evils, though any force they themselves strongly oppose is regarded as a demon or evil in their sight.
    Spoiler: Seryn
    Show
    Seryn is the garden of hope, a vulnerable but well-liked community responsible for the production of most medicine and clean food. Situated underground in the Deepwood, their ceilings and structures are reinforced by the roots of the towering trees above.
    There is magic performed in Seryn which provides clean life for their trees and plants, though they refuse to share this energy with the other colonies. Because of their dependence on the medicine and healing of the thriving colony, the other settlements maintain good relations with Seryn, though some may plot to steal the source of their power. When Seryn is attacked, the other colonies are quick to rush to their defense, and Seryn often houses a small platoon of borrowed soldiers for this reason.
    Colonists in Seryn may follow any training they desire, though upon achieving appropriate rank in a vocation they earn a title respective to it. Such titles are often named for trees or plants (many of which they've never seen, but which live on in legend and herb-lore) such as Tigerlily (spellcraft), Sedar (architecture), and Blackthorne (apothecary). The great masters of Seryn often have a slew of such titles, and default to the moniker which denotes their favored vocation. They believe in a supreme deity of good who provides life and nourishment, and in a rival deity of evil who seeks to extinguish life with suffering and pain.
    Spoiler: Azhuri
    Show
    Azhuri is the citadel of law and order, located in the north-east portion of the Great Plains. Azhurites value social order and expectations above individual desires and gain; only through cooperation and unity have they survived for this long.
    Azhuri is home to the best library of magical resources, and as such derive most of their strength from spellcraft. Rituals are a product of Azhuri, which they've shared with the intellectuals of other colonies for a price.
    [I need a good idea for what sub-cultural affiliations Azhuri would have. I'm thinking they would be defined by career, and forced into their optimum career at adulthood. Similar to Thorian Devotions or Seryn Vocations, but they don't choose their path]
    Spoiler: Horvos
    Show
    Horvos is one of the only colonies to still use a standard currency, and they've built their economy on the exchange of goods via caravans and sea-travel. Though not a port itself, Horvos is close enough to the sea that a day's travel can get you to the shore, where a small port can manage no more than two ships simultaneously. Horvos is home to most exiles from the eastern land across the Charibdian Sea, and boasts a wider collection of languages than any other colony, though they've established Olcar as a local common tongue.
    Horvos holds wealth and monetary gain in high regard, and its primary factions are divided on how best to acquire and spend their coin. Joining a guild is a relatively effortless procedure, but ascending within its ranks usually involves a great deal of effort and labor. The guild leaders have a great deal of respect from their underlings, and from the common, unaligned folk of Horvos.
    Spoiler: Dymis
    Show
    Dymis, known as the Secret City, is located in the far south-eastern corner of the Great Plains, not far from the Blackmire. Cut off from the other colonies by a particularly dangerous stretch of land, not even the Horvio caravans dare make the dangerous trek to Dymis. Because of this, only Dymese refugees know the exact location of their city, and are unable to describe the location for lack of landmarks.
    Civil upheaval in Dymis has created a great number of warring factions, with each losing group being forcefully expelled from their city. Dymese exiles value their secrecy, and go to great lengths to acquire strength or information which might one day allow them to return to their home.
    [I need sub-cultures for Dymis as well. They don't have as specific a theme as the other cities, and will likely be fairly standard factions, like warriors, thieves, arcanists, merchants, etc.]
    Spoiler: Loggai
    Show
    Loggai is the primary city on the border of the Blackmire, directly south of Seryn and situated in a mighty mountain range. Loggai keeps fair relations with all the nearest colonies, but they harbor secret alliances with some of the monstrous creatures that dwell in the Blackmire. Colonists of Loggai will do whatever it takes to survive, and value their own lives and well-being over their communities, friends, and allegiances. Often treacherous and prone to treat with demons and monsters, the people of Loggai are always under a suspicious eye and kept at arms length.
    Citizens of Loggai are divided by their allegiances and alliances, who-knows-who, and who-owes-who-a-favor. They use terms and titles that represent their alliances and associations, such as Beast-Brother, Oni-kin, and Herb-keep.


    The campaign will be starting in Thoros, whose neighboring colonies are Seryn and Garl. The characters will likely never reach Dymis, as the campaign will draw them to Horvos, where they will set out across the sea. I'm fleshing out the cities mostly to provide character backgrounds and affiliations.
    Across the sea, they will encounter the ruins of an older civilization, which will actually be the remnants of a campaign we started a few years ago but were unable to finish. What the players don't know is that this campaign is set to be the end for the unfinished story, set hundreds of years after their old characters failed to stop the BBEG.
    As the characters travel east, they get closer to the source of the miasma, and the toxic and anti-magical effects will get stronger there.


    Social Issues
    I'm trying to categorize my thoughts and plans, and outlining has never been my thing. Anyway, there are a few social issues that need to be addressed. This is also a good way to go over the factions for each community.
    • Timeline: This campaign includes and references information from 3 different periods in history.
      Spoiler: Age of Dragons
      Show
      In the Age of Dragons, powerful interplanar beings came to this world and became primitive gods. These beings have gone by many different names in many different realms and planes, and here they were dragons. Nine such beings became nine powerful dragon-gods, with their own cults, champions, and magical resources. A feud broke out, with three brothers fighting three others, while the last three remained neutral. After nearly all their resources had been expended, one of the neutral brothers called for a truce, and each brother agreed to attend the meeting. However, the evil brother Kh'rane set a trap for his noble brother Ansyis, slaughtering him before he reached the meeting site. In a vengeful rage, his former allies joined with his living adversaries, and the seven living brothers cast Kh'rane into the void. To prevent further strife, they each agreed to bring their greatest weapon to a large vault, which would be sealed against all their efforts. However, a rebel arose from among the ruby dragon's worshipers, who slew the other champions and claimed all the weapons for himself. Weakened from their struggles against Kh'rane, the dragons resorted to imprisoning the turncloak champion in the bowels of his temple, and all memory of the ruby dragon's cult was destroyed. The Age of Dragons ended soon after, with each cult becoming little more than a small forgotten sect.
      Spoiler: Age of Myths
      Show
      In the Age of Myths, heroes arose from each culture and were elevated to a god-like status. Each race had its own such deity, and their own codes and temples. During this time, a civil war broke out among the elves, as the low-born bloodlines rebelled against the high-born masters they served. A secret cult was formed in the low-elven society, worshiping a dark new god of nightmares. This cult used dark curses on the temples of the other gods, stealing the divine power their for their own master. The ancient dragons saw this threat for its true purpose, a new cult under Kh'rane's influence, attempting to release him upon their realm once more. The seven gathered new heroes, granted them great power, and sent them against this cult in a final confrontation. Unfortunately, they battled to a stalemate, and a rift was opened, though Kh'rane himself was unable to pass through. Thus ended the Age of Myths.
      Spoiler: Age of Darkness
      Show
      The Age of Darkness began when the dragons' champions sought to right their wrongs, travelling to each of the cursed temples in an effort to shut off Kh'rane's influence from the world. They succeeded in closing four of his "dark gates," but internal strife cost many of them their lives before they were able to close the last four. Hundreds of years later, new champions arise, and will be pulled from distant lands to finish the quest that the dragons' knights had left unfinished at the dawn of this age. The miasma and afflictions they deal with are a direct result of Kh'rane's realm leaking evil power into this plane through the four open gates. As each gate closes, the burden on the world will lighten, and the new champions will gain fame and power.
    • Races: Hundreds (perhaps thousands, I'm not sure yet) of years have passed since the Withering at the dawn of the Age of Darkness. Lifetimes spent underground, cowering in fear of the miasmic air has created new evolutionary bloodlines more capable of surviving in this harsh world. All races will be edited to reflect an underground lifestyle, gaining better night-vision and losing frivolous perks and boons. Heritage matters less than the culture where one is raised, and all races will have social traits removed as well (like elven weapon proficiencies or dwarven prejudices). However, each character will have a background specific to their origins which provides social benefits like this. A sample first level character would be a Thorian Elf Fighter, who would have class features of a fighter, biological traits of an elf (perception, ability scores), and the social traits of a citizen of Thoros (weapon proficiencies, skill bonuses).


    Work in progress
    Last edited by gr8artist; 2014-04-07 at 09:14 PM.
    My Homebrew and Extended Signature
    Current avatar: Charza Sahlaren, by gr8artist

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    gr8artist's Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Homebrew
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: The Witherlands Campaign (advice desired)

    Listing game mechanics information, separate from the fluff above.

    Character Creation
    We will be rolling characters with a point buy or "purchase" system, using the Low Fantasy value, 10 points. Ability score increases will come at every even level, rather than every 4th. Hit dice are not rolled, but are instead calculated as "max - 2" (including first level). So a Rogue with 10 con would have 6/12/18 HP for his first 3 levels. We will be starting at level 1.

    Races
    Elf - The elves of this age have a darker tint to their skin and a colorless complexion and appearance. The miasma has affected them more than nearly any other race, though their suffering has helped them learn to pierce its effects more easily.
    Spoiler
    Show
    0 - Type: Humanoid (Elf)
    0 - Size: Medium
    0 - Base speed: 30 ft.
    +3 - Ability scores: +2 Dex, -4 Con, +2 Int, +2 Cha
    +2 - Elven Immunities (Immune to sleep effects; +2 on saves vs Enchantment)
    +1 - Skill Bonus (Perception +2)
    +1 - Darkvision (60 ft), Light Sensitivity
    +3 - Deep Magic (+2 caster level vs spell resistance, +2 bonus on dispel checks)
    Total 10 race points

    Dwarf - The dwarves were the first to retreat to safety beneath the ground, and are the most hesitant to return to the surface. They have thrived when most other races have floundered, and their intuitive knowledge of caves and caverns has placed them in high regard in most colonies.
    Spoiler
    Show
    0 - Type: Humanoid (Dwarf)
    0 - Size: Medium
    1 - Base speed: 20 ft., Slow 'n steady (not reduced by armor or encumbrance)
    +3 - Ability scores: -2 Dex, +4 Con, +2 Wis, -2 Cha
    +3 - Hardy (+2 bonus on saves vs poison, spells, and SLA's)
    +1 - Stability (+4 bonus to CMD vs trips and bull-rushes)
    +1 - Stonecunning (+2 bonus on perception for unusual stonework)
    +1 - Darkvision (120 ft), Light Blindness
    +2 - Cave Dweller (+2 bonus on knowledge [dun] and survival while underground)
    Total 10 race points

    Gnome - Gnomes were some of the last to retreat from the surface, confident that their magic could hold the miasma at bay. Rather than opposing the miasma, their magic seemed to bend to it, and was forever changed. Their small size and intuitive awareness have kept them alive in these dangerous times, despite their overall weakness.
    Spoiler
    Show
    0 - Type: Humanoid (Gnome)
    0 - Size: Small
    1 - Base speed: 20 ft.
    +3 - Ability scores: -4 Str, +2 Dex, +2 Int, +2 Wis
    +2 - Resistant (+2 bonus on saves against mind-affecting effects and poison)
    +2 - Lesser Spell Resistance (6+HD)
    +3 - Fell Magic (+1 to DC of necromancy spells)
    - - - - If Wis ≥ 11, gain the following SLA's (Each 1/day, CL=HD, DC 10+SL+Wis)
    - - - - bleed, chill touch, detect poison, touch of fatigue
    +1 - Darkvision (60 ft.), Light Sensitivity
    Total 10 race points

    Orc - Hardy and resilient, the orcs of the new are are like tempered steel, made stronger by the trials they've overcome. Orcs use their powerful frames to crush opposition and prove that when all else is stripped away, only the fittest will survive.
    Spoiler
    Show
    0 - Type: Humanoid (Orc)
    0 - Size: Medium
    0 - Base speed: 30 ft.
    +4 - Ability scores: +4 Str, +2 Con, -2 Int, -2 Wis
    +1 - Skill bonus (Intimidation +2)
    +1 - Bite (1d4)
    +4 - Ferocity (concious while HP < 0, still staggered and losing 1 HP per round)
    +1 - Darkvision (120 ft.), Light Blindness
    Total 11 race points

    Boggart - Surprisingly cunning and cruel, these athletic goblinoids are notoriously difficult to kill. Whether Boggarts adapted to the miasma or were spawned because of it is still a mystery to most, but a Boggart's presence almost always makes others nervous. They prefer living above ground, and the miasma that permeates their bodies makes them untrustworthy in the eyes of others.
    Spoiler
    Show
    0 - Type: Humanoid (Goblinoid)
    0 - Size: Small
    0 - Base speed: 30 ft.
    0 - Ability scores: -2 Str, +2 Dex, +2 Int
    1 - Distrustful (-2 penalty to diplomacy and handle animal)
    +3 - Deathless Spirit (negative energy resistance 5, other defenses)
    - - - - +2 save bonus vs necromancy, death, energy drain, negative energy
    - - - - No HP lost from negative level
    +2 - Resistant (+2 save bonus vs mind-affecting effects and poisons)
    +2 - Claws (1d3)
    +1 - Poison Use (never risk poisoning themselves)
    +1 - Toxic Blood (swift action, number of uses/day equal to [Con] mod)
    - - - - (DC 10 + 1/2 HD + Con, 1 save, 1/rnd for 6 rnds, 1d2 Str)
    +2 - Darkvision (120 ft.), Light Sensitivity
    Total 10 race points


    Ghul'mar - The Ghul'mar are the twisted and cursed decendents of the once proud human culture. While many have differing views on the origin of the Ghul'mar, most historians agree that they have become filled with the otherworldly, deathly energies that came about with the Withering. Ghul'mar, despite having a humanoid shape, have become so permeated with unnatural energies that they are more akin to demons or undead than they are to their ancestors.
    Spoiler
    Show
    +3 - Type: Outsider (native) with ties to the Voidrealm, half-undead
    0 - Size: Medium
    0 - Base speed: 30 ft.
    0 - Ability scores: Ghul'mar gain a +2 bonus to one ability score of your choice.
    1 - Negative energy affinity (healed by negative energy, harmed by positive)
    +1 - Undead resistance (+2 to saves vs disease and mind-affecting effects)
    +1 - Resist level drain (no penalty from energy drain, negative levels removed after 24 hours)
    +1 - Dual minded (+2 to will saves)
    +2 - Shadow resistance (cold/electric resistance 5)
    +4 - Hell'sblood (+2 bonus on knowledge [planes and religion])
    - - - - (+1 caster level for Necromancy, [evil], and [darkness] spells)
    1 - Darkvision (120 ft.), Light blindness (DV 60' as outsider trait for free)
    Total 10 race points


    Backgrounds
    A character's home colony determines certain aspects of his character, as well as a culturally accepted belief system or outlook. These are selected based on where the character received their formative training, not where they've most recently lived or where they've been born.
    Thoros - Citizens of Thoros are raised with a sense of devotion and honor. They believe in the supremacy of their own skill, as opposed to divine intervention or luck. Many of their citizens follow the devotion of Steel, but even those that choose another path in life are still taught the fundamentals of warfare. Thoros is widely regarding as having the strongest militia, best defenses, and the most highly trained soldiers.
    Spoiler: Bonuses
    Show
    +2 - Light armor proficiency
    +2 - Simple weapon proficiency, and the Thoran half-spear is considered a martial weapon.
    +2 - Eternal Hope (+2 vs fear and despair effects. 1/day reroll natural 1)
    +4 - Skilled (+1 skill rank per hit die)
    0 - Thorans speak Ansin and Karsi, but by default do not read either.
    Total 10 race points.
    Spoiler: Subculture: Devotions
    Show
    Upon reaching a young adult age, Thorans must choose one devotion to follow. While this has little impact on their cultural training, it does influence their philosophies and ideals. (A character's traits and early feats should reflect this selection)
    Devotion of Bone - The study of medicine, embalming, and some history. Thorans within this devotion are taught to be practical, cautious, and helpful. Their sigil is a mortar and pestle.
    Devotion of Life - Best defined as care for the weak or helpless, this devotion focuses on gardening, child-care, and the training of animals. They study medicine, the teaching of others, and discipline. Their sigil is a rooted sapling springing from the ground.
    Devotion of Iron - Thorans of this path tend to be practical, hard-working, and passionate, for these qualities are idealized among craftsmen. They focus on individual will, creativity, and practicality, and are widely known as some of the finest smiths and artisans throughout the land. Their sigil is an anvil and greathammer.
    Devotion of Steel - The largest and most respected Devotion, those who enlist in this path focus on skill-at-arms, combat tactics, and survival against all odds. Competition and challenge are viewed as potential victories, and the Steel refuse to back down from a fight. Their sigil is a simple shield and longsword.
    Devotion of Winds - The study of travel, languages, lore and diplomacy, this Devotion includes most bards and merchants. They focus on motivation, adaptability, and commerce, are are the first to embrace outsiders. Their sigil is a curling breeze.
    Devotion of Quills - Those who follow the Quill have chosen a path filled with knowledge and learning, often at the expense of physical exercise. They tend to value cunning, history, and magical practice above all else, and they keep one of the largest libraries outside of Azhuri. Their sigil is a quill on parchment.


    WIP
    Last edited by gr8artist; 2014-03-05 at 03:19 PM.
    My Homebrew and Extended Signature
    Current avatar: Charza Sahlaren, by gr8artist

  3. - Top - End - #3
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    ElfPirate

    Join Date
    Feb 2008

    Default Re: The Witherlands Campaign (advice desired)

    Scurvy. Rickets. If you can't eat any plants outside Seryn you've got a serious health problem. Maybe there's a weed or two which people can eat safely?

    Ro'kas needs some sort of strength - or their disunity and tendency to really annoy others (I'm assuming based on the description of their philosophy) will get them crushed in a war. A natural resource, allied creatures, just plain numbers, something. Never mind distance/supplies making war difficult, if people really want a fight they'll manage it.

  4. - Top - End - #4
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    gr8artist's Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Homebrew
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: The Witherlands Campaign (advice desired)

    Food grown within one of the miasma-free cities is healthy, though stunted for lack of sunlight. Fungi and lichens which grow underground are a common staple, and special gardens treated to grow plants without adequate light round out their diets.
    Ro'kas has little or nothing to offer would-be conquerors. They frequently feud with Garl, but Ro'kas is located in a mountain range that makes it difficult to assault.
    While I'm here, I'll post some houserules I plan to employ.

    Mechanics rules.
    • We'll be using adjusted linguistics rules. Default languages are those your character can read and speak, based on your background. Associated languages are those you can learn to read and speak for a single rank, based on your background and race. All other languages require a single rank to learn to read OR speak, but not both.
    • We will be using some fumble rules, because my group likes them. (Yes, I've asked, and yes, they want to use fumbles)
      • Natural ones always fail in a challenge, and fumble if a confirmation roll also fails.
      • A character cannot fumble when performing a relatively menial task, or a task on which even a 1 will succeed.
      • Spells can fumble on their SR checks.
      • Fumbles will not be humorous or excessive, but will cost the character time or resources to recover from, depending on the situation.
      • Stronger weapons or actions will have stiffer penalties, so characters using TWF risk less from their attacks.
    • All iterative attacks after the first are at -5, rather than expanding into -10 and -15. This should add more accuracy to fighter types. Secondary natural attacks are made at -2 as though the creature had multiattack feat, unless the creature is using a non-natural attack as well. When mixing attack types, natural attacks are all made at -5.
    • Monks get a buff.
      • In keeping with the idea of the above rule and the new TWF rules, monk flurry at level 20 will be +18/+18/+13/+13/+13/+13/+13/+13.
      • Monks get extra movement during a flurry of blows equal to half their fast movement bonus.
      • Monks get a full BAB. So no more discrepancy between their attack bonus while flurrying and their bonus when not flurrying.
      • Monks are officially proficient with unarmed strikes (which they may have already been).
      • A monk with natural weapons like claws or teeth may use those weapons after his flurry (for extra attacks at -5 and 1/2 strength) or as part of his flurry (replacing unarmed strike damage).
    • There is no longer a penalty for using an inappropriately sized weapon, though you must still be within the size range able to use it. So, no penalty for a human using a halfling greatsword 1 handed, but he still can't use an ogre's greataxe, since it'd be heavier than a 2 handed weapon for him.
    • We will have a more orderly weapon size curve: 1, 1d2, 1d3, 1d4, 1d6, 1d8, 1d10, 2d6, 2d8, 2d10, 4d6, 4d8, 4d10, 8d6, etc... Weapons which use non-conventional die intervals, such as the scythe and greataxe, may be converted to a more universal value, such as a 1d8 scythe and a 2d6 greataxe. I'm going to be a bit more lenient about allowing some size bonuses to stack, such as lead blades + enlarge person giving extra interval increases.
    • Escaping a pin returns you to the grappled state, rather than freeing you entirely.
    • Charging gives you +2 to attack and damage on your first attack after a charge, and no bonus on subsequent attacks.
    • All classes which normally get less than 4 skill ranks per level now get 4 instead. The monk and druid get 6.
    • Many feats that give small bonuses will upgrade naturally, like the skill focus feats now do.
      • Dodge will increase to +2 at level 10.
      • Weapon focus increases to +2 at +10 BAB. Greater weapon focus now grants +2 to attack rolls. Weapon focus also includes the following ability: "You may spend a swift action to double your weapon focus on your next attack."
      • Fleet increases to +10 ft. at level 10.
      • Improved channel now improves to +4 at level 10.
      • Spell focus and elemental focus now grant +2 to DC's instead of +1, and they double at caster level 10th to +4. Greater spell focus now grants +2 to DC's.
      • Shield focus increases to +2 at +10 BAB. Greater shield focus now grants a +2 to AC.
      • Spell penetration increases to +4 at caster level 10th. Greater spell penetration now grants +4 to overcome spell resistance checks.
      • Point blank shot increases to +2 at +10 BAB.
      • Two weapon defense now gives +2 to AC, and increases to +4 at +10 BAB.
      • (additional recommendations are welcome)
    • Many feats are getting mechanics buffs
      • Two weapon fighting now grants an off-hand attack any time you may normally make only one attack (such as a charge or AoO). TWF's prereq reduced to 13 Dex. TWF keeps all its old perks. Improved TWF's prereq is reduced to 15 Dex, and now grants an off-hand attack for every iterative attack. So, at +11 BAB, you would get +11/+11/+6/+6/+6/+6 before TWF penalties. (see the rule about iteratives, above)
      • Weapon finesse is now a default option for characters. They use the higher of their strength or dexterity scores when using a finesse'able weapon. A character uses the higher of their strength or dex scores for their CMB, and still uses both for CMD. Agile maneuvers and weapon finesse are removed.
      • The vital strike line now works on your first hit in a full-round action or charge, as well. Improved vital strike also applies vital strike's benefit (double damage) on your second attack in a full-round action. Greater vital strike now applies IVS's benefit (triple damage) on your second attack in a full round attack, and VS's benefit on your third. So, at +11 BAB, with all three feats, you would attack at +11/+6/+6 for 4x/3x/2x damage. If using VS and TWF, VS's damage works for both attacks at that level. So, if using ITWF in the previous example, you would attack at +11/+11/+6/+6/+6/+6 for 4x/4x/3x/3x/2x/2x damage.
      • Critical focus gives a +4 to confirm fumbles as well as crits, reducing the chance of a fumble (since the fumble confirmation needs to fail to make it a fumble).
      • Shield master now allows you to ignore only the TWF penalties for your shield attacks, and nothing else. However, shield master also allows all shields to count as light weapons when determining TWF penalties (so you could use a heavy shield instead of a light shield with no penalty to your main hand).
      • Power attack now works for all melee attacks, Deadly aim works for all ranged attacks. Piranha strike is removed. Power attack and deadly aim now have no ability score prerequisites. The BAB prereq remains for both.
      • Exotic weapon proficiency now has no BAB prereq.
      • Improved combat maneuver feats now give a bonus of 2 + 1/4 BAB, and include the benefits of greater combat maneuver feats once you hit +6 BAB. So, improved trip at +8 BAB grants you +4 to CMB and CMD with trips, as well as not provoking when you trip and having the victim of your trip provoke. Improved combat maneuver feats now have no feat prerequisite (such as combat expertise or power attack).
      • Arcane armor training/mastery no longer requires a swift action, but is instead a standard bonus.
      • Martial weapon proficiency now applies to a whole weapon group (such as light blades, heavy blades, hammers, etc.), chosen from the fighter's list.
      • Weapon focus/specialization and other weapon-specific fighter feats work for a whole weapon group, chosen from the fighter's list.
      • Cleave now includes the effects of 3.5, allowing you to make your second attack against any creature within reach if your first attack drops the target.
      • Quick draw now allows you to sheathe your weapon as a swift action.
      • Iron will, lightning reflexes, and great fortitude now include the benefits of their improved versions, allowing a reroll 1/day before knowing the result.
      • Improved initiative now grants 2+1/4 BAB to your initiative rolls.
      • Toughness grants 2 HP +1 HP per hit die, rather than 3 HP +1 HP per hit die after 3rd, basically granting 2 more HP than it did previously. You can continue to take Toughness multiple times, if you choose, and it stacks (2+1/HD, 4+2/HD, 6+3/HD).
      • (additional recommendations are welcome)
    Last edited by gr8artist; 2014-03-05 at 08:07 PM.
    My Homebrew and Extended Signature
    Current avatar: Charza Sahlaren, by gr8artist

  5. - Top - End - #5
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Everyl's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: The Witherlands Campaign (advice desired)

    I like what you're doing with the races - that's something I heartily agree with. I would likely use similar house-rules if I were to run a D&D game in the near future. I'd like to see the details of the racial genetics + cultural background rules once they're fleshed out.

    Why hasn't Seryn been conquered by another colony or group yet? You mention that they are vulnerable and have resources that basically everyone would kill to have, plus their neighbors include a colony of unashamed, battle-loving raiders.
    I have decided I no longer like my old signature, so from now on, the alphorn-wielding lobster yodeler in my profile pic shall be presented without elaboration.

  6. - Top - End - #6
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    gr8artist's Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Homebrew
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: The Witherlands Campaign (advice desired)

    Upon further consideration, I think I can do away with the mechanical benefits for sub-cultures. Each region/colony will still have benefits that it grants, but there won't be mechanical benefits for sub-cultures such as the different Thorian Devotions, or different Guilds from Horvos.

    Seryn's ability to grow living plants is a combination of regional conditions and practiced magic. The withered plants that grow elsewhere can be eaten for sustenance if necessary, making the primary difference between Seryn and other foods a matter of health.
    Conquering Seryn would only be half the equation; without their magic, the local plants would gradually become corrupted as well.
    Also, other regions loan defenders to Seryn, in exchange for food and medicine.
    My Homebrew and Extended Signature
    Current avatar: Charza Sahlaren, by gr8artist

  7. - Top - End - #7
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    Omeganaut's Avatar

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Plane of Science
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: The Witherlands Campaign (advice desired)

    Perhaps just have a floating skill bonus to reflect cultural upbringing. Craft or Profession would be good choices, but others like Survival, Spot, or Diplomacy would work as well.
    I have returned, and plan on focusing on world-building. Issues are being dealt with.

    Quote Originally Posted by MesiDoomstalker View Post
    Thread won! I don't think I have the authority to do that but whatever

  8. - Top - End - #8
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    gr8artist's Avatar

    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Homebrew
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: The Witherlands Campaign (advice desired)

    Ah, yes. Several colonies already have skill bonuses ingrained into them. I've been caught between updating the information in this thread, and updating the information I give my players, and I've sadly let this thread fall a little behind.

    This is a link to all current Houserules, Races, and Cultures.
    My Homebrew and Extended Signature
    Current avatar: Charza Sahlaren, by gr8artist

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •