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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Halfling in the Playground
     
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    Post [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    I've been trying to put together a bronze age Sumerian campaign for some time, ever since reading Between the Rivers by Harry Turtledove. Unfortunately, there aren't any sources that deal specifically with the Sumerians. I've been gathering material from the Testament setting, OGL-Ancients, and Ancient Kingdoms: Mesopotamia, but none of the settings are exactly what I've envisioned.

    Therefore, I come here, to present a homebrew system that I hope will work out. For the moment, I'd appreciate any help developing fluff for the deities. and cities below. I plan to implement the system using a d20-modern world system (based on humans alone), but brought into the ancient past. I also like the quality of having each class be more of a profession and less of a straightjacket as in normal D&D.

    The (d20 modern)fantasy base classes are located here, thanks to Skrittiblak. I post this as a reference, so that the advanced classes have somewhere to build from.

    A teraph is a small idol or amulet, embued with the power of the god. One of the new advanced classes (which I will post later) is an idol-maker, who crafts teraphs of the deities. Carrying a teraph grants a +2 bonus to will and fort saves made against divine energy.

    Kudur
    Overview
    The land of Kudur is located in between two large rivers, the Idigna and the Buranun, providing its inhabitants (the Kudurrut) with plenty of fresh water for irrigation, and flood plains on which they can plant crops.

    A great flood wiped the region clean of all life 20 or so generations ago; after the flood waters receeded, the Kudurrut found the land empty and settled it. They brought with them knowledge of agriculture, irrigation, and farming techniques, but no longer remember their old homeland or even the reason for leaving. Since settling in Kudur, the Kudurrut have formed city-states around a single deity a piece. These city-states mainly engage in peaceful trade, but occasionally war with one another, as decreed by their ruling gods. Only humans live in Kudur; the flood wiped out any non-human sentient species that may have existed.

    The city-states of Kudur are centralized along the south-eastern ends of the rivers; upstream, to the north-west, lies the empire of Ashur. The Assyrians also immigrated to the region following the flood water's recession, and have banded in a loose empire held together by a common pantheon of deities and military might.

    To the south and west of Kudur is a great desert, upon which caravans may become lost in a seemingly-endless sea of sand. The few caravans which have returned report a massive empire, full of jewels, gold, and grain, and led by a man who claims to be the son-of-the-Sun.

    To the North-east of Kudurr lie the Zagros Mountains, and the Alashkurrut, a mountain people who trade frequently with the Kudurrut. They also maintain city-states, but have fewer people than the Kudurrut due to their inhospitable climate.

    South-East of Kudurr, the rivers Idigna and Buranun empty into Parsa Derayan, a salt-water gulf that continues for miles beyond where any caravan has explored.

    Most human practices have fallen under the auspices of a god or goddess; there is a god of bricklaying, a goddess of pottery, and so on. The only exceptions to this are writing and smithing, both of which are too new to have associated themselves with a god. In some city-states, the people strive to keep the powers for humanity alone, while others actively seek a demon to whom they can ascribe the power and deify into a lesser god. In the meanwhile, smiths and scribes have a resistance to the divine nature, some even forgetting about the gods and goddesses for months at a time.

    A map of Kudur

    City States (and their deities)
    Aggasher
    Spoiler
    Show
    Aggasher is located on the river Idigna, at the natural crossing point on the caravan road to the Zagros Mountains. It benefits from the traders that come by, and its highly fortified position discourages attack from its neighbors. It is bordered by Zuabu to the south-west and Gibil to the west. The Aggasherut led by an Enisi (High Priestess), a rarity among the mainly male dominated region of Kudur. The city is known for having powerful healers and beautiful women, but the men are more likely to be submissive to the will of their wives.

    Deity:
    Eniaggasher (goddess of the Underworld) (LN)
    This clever, beautiful, and very dark goddess seduced Nergal and then dragged him down to Esagila (“The Land of No Return”) to be its ruler, threatening to unleash the dead on Earth unless he complied with her wishes. As one of the underworld’s co-rulers, Eniaggasher receives the offerings for the dead, and she is often praised in the hymns of the dead, possibly in hopes of keeping her away. Her messenger, the demigod Namtar, is known as the bringer of 60 plagues.

    Eniaggasher’s holy weapon is the heavy pick. She has no sacred animal. Eniaggasher’s teraph grants a +2 competence bonus to all Heal and Medicine checks.

    Background Info: Characters from Aggasher receive a +1 background bonus to their Charisma ability score and a +2 background bonus to all heal checks, but women receive a -1 penalty to all Knowledge checks and men receive a -1 penalty to their Will save.



    Gibil
    Spoiler
    Show
    Gibil is located in the flood plain between the Idigna and the Buranun, and is supported by a network of small villages and farms that use irrigation channels to grow food. It is bordered by Ekur to the north-west, Aggasher to the east, Zuabu to the south-east, and Immursag to the south. The Giblut are as clever as their god is lax; because Engibil chooses to remove himself from Gibli affairs, the Giblut have had to step in and run things themselves. They are led by a Lugal (Prince-king), who rules in his own right rather than as a divine mouthpiece.

    Deity:
    Engibil (god of art and new ideas) (CG)
    This lazy, vain, and slothful god is the perfect patron of the arts and new ideas. He has gradually withdrawn himself from the people of his city, content to let the humans rule themselves – as long as they provide him with “New things, strange things, valuable things” for him to admire and adorn himself with. Engibil does watch over his city-state, and prevents other gods from entering his territory; he just allows the day-to-day activities to be coordinated by the Lugal.

    Engibil’s holy weapon is the short sword. His sacred animal is the camel. Engibil’s teraph grants a +1 competence bonus to all Knowledge checks.

    Background Info: Characters from Gibil receive a +1 background bonus to their intelligence scores and a +2 background bonus to all bluff and appraise checks, but receive a -2 penalty to their diplomacy checks and an -2 penalty to their prayer checks.



    Immursag
    Spoiler
    Show
    Immursag is located at the fork between two tributaries of the river Buranun and borders both Gibil (to the north) and Zuabu (to the east). It holds an extremely defensible position due to being surrounded on three sides by river, but holds an uneasy peace with Gibil. The Immursagut are extremely beholden to their god, Enimmursag – they rely on him to make just about every major decision in their lives. Because of this, the streets are clean, the city is organized, and people work hard. On the other hand, the people are slow to react to new situations, and even slower to adopt new ideas.

    Deity:
    Enimmursag (god of war) (LE)
    This vain god believes himself to be superior to all the other gods of Kudurr. Unfortunately, his wars with his neighbors Zuabu and Gibil have resulted in an Immursagi defeat every five out of seven times. He especially hates the Giblut, as they continue to win battle after battle, without Engibil ever bothering to show up on the battlefield.

    Enimmursag’s holy weapons are a burning torch and a mace. His holy animal is the lion. Enimmursag’s teraph grants a +1 competence bonus to all Strength based skills.

    Background info: Characters from Immursag receive a +1 bonus to their strength scores and a +2 to all Knowledge:(Religion) checks, but suffer a -1 penalty to their intelligence score. Additionally, while within Immursag, characters gain a +2 bonus to their prayer checks, but suffer a -2 penalty to their prayer check when outside the lands claimed by Enimmursag. This is in addition to any circumstantial modifiers, such as being within a temple, or burning incense.



    Zuabu
    Spoiler
    Show
    Zuabu is dead center in Kudur, center between the rivers, and center among the cities. Its people are tricky and unwarlike; they prefer to remain at peace and then steal from their peaceful neighbors. The Zuabut are led by an Ensi (High Priest), who delivers the orders of Enzuabu to the people.

    Deity:
    Enzuabu (god of thievery) (CN)
    Many stories exist about how Enzuabu became the god of the city that came to bear his name; most of the Kudurrut believe that he had his followers steal the icon of the previous god of the city, and replace it with his own, symbolically “stealing” the city away from that god. It has been long enough now that no one knows if this story is true, or merely a way of explaining the thieving behavior of the Zuabut.

    Enzuabu’s holy weapon is the dagger. His sacred animal is the crow. Enzuabu’s teraph grants a +1 bonus to all dexterity-based skill checks.

    Background Info: Characters from Zuabu receive a +1 background bonus to their dexterity scores and a +2 background bonus to all sleight-of-hand checks, but receive a -1 penalty to all profession and sense motive checks.



    Ekur - needs divine fluff
    Spoiler
    Show
    Ekur is located to the north of Kudur, where the river Idigna and the river Buranun come closest together. It is bordered to the south by Gibil. Ekur guards the shortest crossing point from one side of the two rivers to the other, and extends influence over the tributary river Serwan. Ekur is a city of contention in Kudur, as its people are both of Assyrian and Kudurri descent. It is ruled by an Ensi (high priest), who keeps the disparate people of the city calm by enforcing Enekur’s law equally among those of the same social status.

    Deity:
    Enekur (god of justice)

    Background Info: Characters from Ekur receive a +1 bonus to their wisdom score and the Assyrian language as a bonus language, but suffer a -2 penalty to their diplomacy checks.



    Nugi - needs fluff
    Spoiler
    Show
    Nugi is located in the south of Kudurr, and it straddles the river Buranun just after the two tributaries rejoin into the river. It is bordered to the north by Zuabu and to the south by Isin.

    Deity:
    Eninug (goddess of irrigation and farming)

    Background Info: Characters from Nugi receive a +1 bonus to their constitution score and a +2 bonus to any craft check, but suffer a -2 penalty to any charisma-based skill check used to adjust another’s attitude.



    Isin - needs fluff
    Spoiler
    Show
    Isin is the city furthest south in Kudur. It is located on the delta where the river Buranun empties into the Parsa Derayan. It is bordered to the north by Nugi.

    Deity:
    Enisin (god of travel)

    Background Info: Characters from Isin receive the Endurance feat for free at 1st level. They also receive a +2 bonus to survival, but suffer a -1 penalty to all gather information checks.


    Magic vs. Miracles
    Unlike D&D, where both divine and arcane magic work off the same principle of memorization and spells per day, divine magic in Kudur works using a skill-check system. Every character (whether PC, NPC, or common background folk) has access to the prayer skill, and can use it to attempt to cast a "miracle" (divine spell). Essentially, they are petitioning their deity to produce the desired effect.

    Miracles are worked at no personal cost to the caster, but are harder to achieve the more of them you ask for in a day; the DC of the Prayer check increases based on how many miracles you have already been granted or have asked for but have not received. Gods are not inclined to answer repeated requests from their mortal petitioners.

    Your first miracle of the day is always free. Every request for a miracle after the first increases the DC of the Prayer check necessary to achieve it by +2. So, your first prayer for a miracle is made at no penalty, your second is made at +2 DC, your third is made at a +4 DC and so on. The DC reverts back to normal with the dawning of the sun, so a ‘day’ is defined as the period from one day’s dawn to the next.

    The exception is for those who worship Eniaggasher; their days are defined as the dusk of one day to the dusk of the next. For this reason, the priests and priestesses of Eniaggasher are at their strongest just as the hours of night begin.

    As priests and priestesses advance in level, they are allowed an increased number of ‘free’ miracles per day before the DC of the Prayer check starts to increase. This represents their deity’s increasing regard for them and willingness to intercede in the mortal realms on their behalf.

    The base DC of a miracle is determined by its D&D spell level, using the following table. If the spell is a divine spell in D&D, use the Divine DC column - if the spell is Arcane, use the Arcane DC column.

    {table=head]D&D Level|Divine DC|Arcane DC

    0th|DC 10|DC 15

    1st|DC 10|DC 20

    2nd|DC 15|DC 25

    3rd|DC 15|DC 30

    4th|DC 20|DC 35

    5th|DC 20|DC 40

    6th|DC 25

    7th|DC 25

    8th|DC 30

    9th|DC 30[/table]

    First-Time Casting
    There are no set limits as to which miracles may be prayed for by a given character. You do not gain new miracles as you advance in level. The DC of some of the most powerful miracles places them out of the feasible reach of a beginning character but there is no reason why they should not attempt them if they had managed to garner enough bonuses to their check.

    So long as you have the necessary skill to produce a given magical effect, then you can attempt to produce that effect. However, you do not necessarily know from experience how to go about it, so the first couple of times you attempt to produce the effect are harder than those attempts you make once you are familiar with the process.

    All freshly created characters begin without having prayed for any miracles before in their lives. Their knowledge of such things is entirely technical and not yet practical. Although they know in their minds that they could probably produce a given effect, they are not fully confident until they have actually done so. Once they are used to praying for a given miracle, they find it much easier.

    Accordingly, the DC of each magical effect is raised by +4 on the first time a given character ever attempts to produce it. If he fails, the +4 increase is still in effect the next time he tries it. If he succeeds, the DC is only raised by +2 on the second occasion on which he attempts to produce the effect.

    Again, a failed check does not lower the DC. If you manage to cast the spell successfully a second time, then no further DC modifiers of this kind apply in future. To keep track of this, mark off each effect that you successfully produce once with a single stroke and then make that into an X on the second successful casting. As you extend your reach further and attempt more and more challenging effects, they will become easier. A successfully cast spell is a successfully cast spell irrespective of how much help you may have had. It does not matter if you had other people assisting you or had to spend hours on ritual preparations. So long as you were the caster and you cast successfully, your familiarity with the spell increases. Those who assisted you do not gain any additional familiarity; however, they are not themselves subject to any DC increase while aiding you.

    For example, if a novice priestess is attempting to cast bless for the first time ever, the DC of 10 is increased to 14. If another priestess assists her, her aid another use of the prayer skill is made at the usual DC of 10. However, she would gain no familiarity with bless even if the first priestess cast the spell successfully.

    Divine Points
    Divine points can only be used on tasks that are familiar to you. You may not use divine points to increase the Prayer skill check made to produce a miracle for the first or second time. Once you have succeeded twice and the miracle is ‘known’, then you may increase the relevant skill check with Divine Points.

    Intuitive Grasp
    Characters with the Intuitive Grasp feat do not suffer from these DC modifiers. They cast spells or pray for miracles at the normal DC, whether or not they have ever done so before. Their ingenuity allows them to compensate for their lack of experience. All miracles count as ‘known’ to them. They may also spend Divine Points on praying for miracles whether or not the character has ever produced the magical effect before.
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-05 at 12:19 PM. Reason: added section on divine magic

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Halfling in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    This post will contain the advanced classes as I can write them up.

    Idol-Maker
    10 level advanced class

    All the gods of Kudur make use of multiple idols and other cultic objects as part of the religion. Both small, portable, personal idols and colossal temple statues are commonplace. While anyone can craft a representation of a deity, only an idol-maker can enchant it into a conduit for the deity’s power. These characters craft idols for both personal and general use.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Game Rule Information
    Abilities: The Idol-maker is a subclass of cleric and requires a high Wis score. Idol-makers benefit from having a variety of good Craft skills.
    Abbreviation: Idl
    Hit Die: d8

    Requirements
    Skills: Craft (woodworking, goldsmithing, silversmithing, blacksmithing, or stone masonry) (6 ranks), Knowledge (religion) (6 ranks), Scry (4 ranks)
    Feats: Craft Wondrous Item, Skill Focus (Craft [as appropriate])
    Spellcasting: Ability to cast 3rd-level divine spells

    Class Skills
    Skill Points at Each Level: 4 + Int modifier
    Class Skills: The idol-maker’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Alchemy (Int), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Heal (Wis), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Profession (Wis), Scry (Int), and Spellcraft (Int).

    The Idol-Maker
    {table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

    1st|
    +0
    |
    +2
    |
    +0
    |
    +2
    |Craft Teraphim, personal teraph, +1 level divine spellcaster class

    2nd|
    +1
    |
    +3
    |
    +0
    |
    +3
    |Craft greater idol

    3rd|
    +2
    |
    +3
    |
    +1
    |
    +3
    |Bestow sentience, +1 level divine spellcaster class

    4th|
    +3
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |Idol senses

    5th|
    +3
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |Imbue idol, +1 level divine spellcaster class

    6th|
    +4
    |
    +5
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |Multitude of teraphim

    7th|
    +5
    |
    +5
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |+1 level divine spellcaster class

    8th|
    +6
    |
    +6
    |
    +2
    |
    +6
    |Semblance of life

    9th|
    +6
    |
    +6
    |
    +3
    |
    +6
    |Breath of the god, +1 level divine spellcaster class

    10th|
    +7
    |
    +7
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |Animate idol[/table]

    Class Features
    All the following are features of the idol-maker prestige class:

    Weapon & Armor Proficiency
    An idol-maker gains no weapon or armor proficiency.

    Craft Teraphim
    Idol-makers receive the Craft Teraphim feat as a bonus feat at 1st level.

    Personal Teraph
    At 1st level, an idol-maker can make a teraph devoted to a deity of his pantheon for his own personal use at no cost.

    Spellcasting
    An idol-maker continues to increase in his normal spellcasting abilities as he rises in idol-maker levels. Thus, when a new odd-numbered idol-maker level is gained, he gains new spells per day as if he had also gained a level in the divine spellcasting class he belonged to before he added the prestige class. He does not, however, gain any other benefit a character of that class would have gained.

    Craft Greater Idol
    At 2nd level, an idol-maker can craft a greater idol. A greater idol may be medium size (6 ft. tall), large (9 ft. tall) or huge (12 ft. tall), and must depict a member of the maker’s pantheon. Greater idols have the power and blessing of a teraph of the same deity and circle of protection against law, chaos, good, or evil as most appropriate. To create a greater idol, the idol-maker must spend the requisite amount of time, spend an appropriate amount of money on materials, and make a Craft check. Failure on the check means that the statue is completed, but has no magical properties.

    Bestow Sentience
    On occasion, a god may choose to temporarily place part of his divine essence into a teraph or greater idol, allowing him to exercise all of his abilities through that form. When the god is not actually present in one of his crafted representations, it is often useful for his priests to use magic to make it appear that he is. The first step in doing this is for an idol-maker of 3rd or higher level to bestow limited sentience upon the idol. To bring an idol to a state of consciousness requires sacrifice. Animal sacrifices worth 500 gp per month or treasure sacrifices of 1,000 gp per month will awaken and maintain an idol’s sentience. A one-time human sacrifice will grant sentience to an idol as well. The idol has an Intelligence of 8, and is capable of basic thought and following instruction. The idol has normal human senses. It has a personality similar to the god it represents. The crafter may speak and be understood by the idol, but unless ghost sound or some other sound-based illusion spell has been imbued into the idol, it is unable to reply. Except as noted below, the idol cannot move or attack.

    Idol Senses
    At 4th level, an idol-maker in contact with a sentient idol representing a deity of his pantheon can see and hear anything sensed by another sentient idol of the same god on a successful Spot or Listen check. The idol-maker must be able to specifically identify the remote idol, either by location (e.g., the golden calf statue in Bethel), unique feature (e.g., the tallest idol of Baal-Hadad), or because it is an idol that he crafted himself.

    Imbue Idol
    At 5th level, an idol-maker can cast spells into an idol, allowing the idol to store the spells and cast them at a later time. The idol casts spells as a spellcaster equal to the idol-maker’s level. The idol must be sentient (see above) to be able to cast the spells with which it has been imbued. The idol-maker does not need to cast imbue with spell ability to imbue the idol. An idol’s spell slots may be filled with arcane or divine spells or a mix of the two. The maximum number of spells a sentient idol can store depends on its creator’s level, as shown on the table below:

    Imbued Idol Spells
    Number of Spells Imbued
    {table=head]Maker’s Level|0lvl|1st|2nd|3rd|4th*|5th*|6th*|7th*

    4th|
    4
    |
    3
    |
    2

    5th|
    4
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    6th|
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    7th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    2
    |
    1

    8th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    2
    |
    1

    9th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2

    10th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1
    [/table]
    *Semblance of Life is required for the idol to be able to
    use spells of this level.

    Multitude of Teraphim
    Whereas a person may normally receive the benefits of one teraph at a time, at 6th level an idol-maker can receive benefits from one teraph per point of his Wisdom bonus. The teraph bonuses of similar types of idols don’t stack.

    Semblance of Life
    At 8th level, an idol-maker receives his most terrifying power: the ability to bring an idol to full sentience by embedding a gem worth at least 20,000 gp into it, then performing a human sacrifice (or an animal sacrifice after casting god form on the animal). This brings the idol to full sentience for a month. It has an Intelligence of 18, and it is capable of both speech and telepathy. Furthermore, the idol is capable of directing its own actions, and can be imbued with higher level spells. The idol loses its sentience if the gem is stolen, or a new human sacrifice is not provided on a monthly basis.

    Breath of the God
    At 9th level, an idol-maker can give a statue the ability to breathe a cone of vapors, 60 ft. in length, as a free action once every hour. The vapors cause the blessing normally attributed to a teraph of the god to affect all in the area; e.g., a statue of Thoth would grant bonuses to Knowledge skill checks, while one of Asherah would improve Heal checks. The idol-maker must burn incense before the idol for 12 continuous hours to give it the breath of the god power, and this ritual must be redone every month or the power is lost.

    Animate Idol
    At 10th level, an idol-maker can bring a sentient idol to a semblance of life and order it to attack. The idol-maker must be within 30 ft. of the idol to give this command, and may only do this once per day. The maximum number of idols that may be animated is equal to the idol-maker’s Charisma modifier (minimum of one). An idol remains animated for a number of rounds equal to the idol maker’s class level + his Intelligence bonus (if any). If the idol was crafter by a different idol-maker, animating it requires a Knowledge (religion) or Knowledge (arcana) check with a DC equal to that required to make the idol: 13 for a teraph, 15 for a Medium-sized idol, 20 for Large, or 30 for Huge. Animated idols have the following stats, depending on their size category:

    Teraph
    (Diminutive Construct):
    Spoiler
    Show
    CR 4
    HD 1d10 (5 hp)
    Init +1 (+1 Dex)
    Spd 20 ft. (4 squares)
    AC 18 (+4 size, +1 Dex, +3 natural)
    Atk melee -2, Dmg 1d4-2 (19- 20/x2)
    Space 1 ft. by 1 ft. Reach 0 ft.
    Special Attacks: imbued spells
    Special Qualities: darkvision 60 ft., cold, electricity, fire resistance 10, DR 15/+1, SR 8
    Alignment: N
    Saves: Fort +0, Ref +1, Will +2
    Abilities: Str 7, Dex 12, Con --, Int 8/18, Wis 14, Cha 8


    Medium-Sized Idol
    (Medium Construct):
    Spoiler
    Show
    CR 7
    HD 6d10 (33 hp)
    Init +1 (+1 Dex)
    Spd 40 ft. (8 squares)
    AC 19 (+1 Dex, +8 natural)
    Atk melee +9 Dmg 2d6+5 (19-20/x2)
    Space 5 ft. by 5 ft.; Reach 5 ft.
    Special Attacks: imbued spells
    Special Qualities: darkvision 60 ft., cold, electricity, fire resistance 10, DR 15/+3, SR 16
    Alignment: N
    Saves: Fort +2, Ref +3, Will +4
    Abilities: Str 21, Dex 12, Con --, Int 8/18, Wis 14, Cha 8


    Large Idol
    (Large Construct):
    Spoiler
    Show
    CR 9
    HD 12d10 (66 hp)
    Init +1 (+1 Dex)
    Spd 50 ft.
    AC 23 (-1 size, +1 Dex, +13 natural)
    Atk melee +16/+11; Dmg 2d8+7 (19-20/x2)
    Space 5 ft. by 5 ft.; Reach 10 ft.
    Special Abilities: imbued spells
    Special Qualities: darkvision 60ft., cold, electricity, fire resistance 10, DR 15/+4, SR 20
    Alignment: N
    Saves: Fort +4, Ref +5, Will +6
    Abilities: Str 25, Dex 12, Con --, Int 8/18, Wis 14, Cha 8


    Huge Idol
    (Huge Construct):
    Spoiler
    Show
    CR 11
    HD 18d10 (99 hp)
    Init +1 (+1 Dex)
    Spd 60 ft.
    AC 27 (-2 size, +1 Dex, +18 natural)
    Atk melee +22/+17/+12, Dmg 2d10+9 (19-20/x2)
    Space 10 ft. by 10 ft.; Reach 15 ft.
    Special Attacks: imbued spells
    Special Qualities: darkvision 60 ft., cold, electricity, fire resistance 10, DR 15/+5, SR 24
    Alignment: N
    Saves: Fort +6, Ref +7, Will +8
    Abilities: Str 29, Dex 12, Con --, Int 8/18, Wis 14, Cha 8


    Greater Idol Construction
    {table=head]Size|Days to Construct|Cost (in gp)|Craft DC|Hardness|Hit Points|Area of Power

    Medium-sized|
    10
    |
    3,000
    |
    15
    |
    10
    |
    50
    |30-ft. radius

    Large|
    30
    |
    10,000
    |
    20
    |
    10
    |
    100
    |60-ft. radius

    Huge|
    90
    |
    50,000
    |
    30
    |
    10
    |
    200
    |120-ft. radius[/table]

    from Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era


    Dignitary
    10-level advanced class

    These high-minded politicians achieve their ends through resources, persuasion and movement in the circles of power. Though they are born into wealth, they choose not to invest in armor and weapons. Instead, they devote themselves to rulership and verbal politics. A dignitary does not fight; she has servants and allies to do that for her.

    Dignitaries have many roles in the ancient world. They act as ambassadors to other countries or city-states, raise forces to invade their neighbors, fund expeditions, hatch plots and conspire in the circles of power. Dignitaries are the natural spokesmen for a group of characters and often assume a leading role when the group is engaged in social combat. A dignitary will often go adventuring with a noble warrior of the same family. For example, a female Gibli dignitary might go on a diplomatic mission to a rival city-state with her warrior brother as her escort.
    Spoiler
    Show
    It is important to distinguish between a dignitary’s personal wealth and the wealth that she can access. Dignitaries may draw funds or resources from their investments or family holdings, above and beyond any personal fortunes she might have. She does not gain any Reputation bonus from her societal role, even though the amount of money that she could access over the months could exceed the amount necessary to gain a Reputation bonus.

    Requirements:
    Still needed
    Hit Die: d4.

    Class Skills
    Skill Points at Each Level: 6 + Int modifier.
    The dignitary’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Appraise (Int), Bluff (Cha), Diplomacy (Int), Forgery (Int), Jump (Str), Knowledge (any) (Int), Listen (Wis), Presence (Cha), Prayer (Wis), Profession (Wis), Perform (Cha), Sense Motive (Wis), Speak Language (n/a), and Ride (Dex)

    The Dignitary
    {table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

    1st|
    +0
    |
    +0
    |
    +2
    |
    +2
    |Access Resources

    2nd|
    +1
    |
    +0
    |
    +3
    |
    +3
    |Requisition Entourage, Evasive +1

    3rd|
    +1
    |
    +1
    |
    +3
    |
    +3
    |Diplomatic Significance

    4th|
    +2
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |
    +4
    |Authority

    5th|
    +2
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |
    +4
    |Evasive +2

    6th|
    +3
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |
    +5
    |Aura of Importance

    7th|
    +3
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |
    +5
    |Resolute +1

    8th|
    +4
    |
    +2
    |
    +6
    |
    +6
    |Evasive +3, Divine Audience

    9th|
    +4
    |
    +3
    |
    +6
    |
    +6
    |Resolute +2, Voice of Command

    10th|
    +5
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |
    +7
    |Evasive +4, Majesty, Resolute +3[/table]

    Each dignitary is part of a household or organization of some sort. The player must specify what this is. The household may, for example, be that of a wealthy family or a royal personage. The organization may be the government of a Kudur city-state or an extended alliance of Assyrian nobles.

    Class Features
    All of the following are class features of the dignitary.
    Weapon and Armor Proficiency: A dignitary is proficient with all simple weapons and one martial weapon of her choice. She is not proficient with armor or with shields.

    Access Resources: The dignitary may draw upon an assured supply of wealth. Alone of all the character classes, the dignitary does not need to adventure to gain riches. Once per month, a dignitary may garner funds from his family’s holdings of 2d6x10 silver drachmas.

    Requisition Entourage: From 2nd level onwards, the dignitary may requisition slaves, or fighters allied to her house, region or city-state. See the table below for details of how big an entourage the dignitary can request.

    Modifiers: Several factors can affect an dignitaries’ ability to requisition an entourage, causing it to vary from the base Requisition score (Character level + Cha modifier). A character’s reputation (from the point of view of those she is trying to attract) raises or lowers her Requisition score:

    {table=head]Dignitary’s Reputation|Modifier

    Great renown|
    +2

    Fairness and generosity|
    +1

    Special power|
    +1

    Failure|
    –1

    Aloofness|
    –1

    Cruelty|
    –2
    [/table]

    When the dignitary tries to recruit an entourage, use any of the following modifiers that apply.

    {table=head]The Dignitary . . .|Modifier

    Has a stronghold, base of operations, guildhouse, or the like|
    +2

    Moves around a lot|
    –1

    Has caused the death of other entourage members|
    –2*
    [/table]
    * Cumulative per entourage member killed.

    Requisition Score: An dignitary’s base Requisition score equals her level plus any Charisma modifier. In order to take into account negative Charisma modifiers, this table allows for very low Requisition scores. Outside factors can also affect the dignitary’s Requisition score, as detailed above.
    Level: The dignitary can requisition a slave, warrior or noble warrior of up to this level. The Games Master has the final say on which is assigned to the character. Regardless of a character’s Requisition score, she can only recruit a fighter who is two or more levels lower than herself. The entourage member should be equipped with gear appropriate for its class and level. The entourage member does not count as a party member when determining their experience points. Entourage members earn experience points as follows:

    * Divide the entourage member’s level by that of the dignitary with whom they are associated.
    * Multiply this result by the total experience points awarded to the dignitary and add that number of experience points to the entourage member’s total.
    * If an entourage member gains enough experience points to bring it to a level one lower than that of the dignitary, the entourage member does not gain the new level – its new experience points total is one less than the amount needed attain the next level.

    Slave Numbers by Level: The dignitary can also requisition up to the indicated number of slaves of each level. Slaves are similar to fighters, except that they are generally low-level Non-Player Characters. Because they’re generally five or more levels lower than the dignitary they follow, they are rarely effective in combat. Slaves do not earn experience and thus don’t gain levels. However, when the dignitary attains a new level, the player consults the table above to determine if she has acquired more slaves, some of which may be higher level than the her existing entourage.

    {table=head]Requisition Score|Fighter Level|# Slaves Level 1|# Slaves Level 2|# Slaves Level 3|# Slaves Level 4|# Slaves Level 5|# Slaves Level 6

    1

    2|
    1st

    3|
    2nd

    4|
    3rd

    5|
    3rd

    6|
    4th

    7|
    5th

    8|
    5th

    9|
    6th

    10|
    7th
    |
    5

    11|
    7th
    |
    6

    12|
    8th
    |
    8

    13|
    9th
    |
    10
    |
    1

    14|
    10th
    |
    15
    |
    1

    15|
    10th
    |
    20
    |
    2
    |
    1

    16|
    11th
    |
    25
    |
    2
    |
    1

    17|
    12th
    |
    30
    |
    3
    |
    1
    |
    1

    18|
    12th
    |
    35
    |
    3
    |
    1
    |
    1

    19|
    13th
    |
    40
    |
    4
    |
    2
    |
    1
    |
    1

    20|
    14th
    |
    50
    |
    5
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    21|
    15th
    |
    60
    |
    6
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1
    |
    1

    22|
    15th
    |
    75
    |
    7
    |
    4
    |
    2
    |
    2
    |
    1

    23|
    16th
    |
    90
    |
    9
    |
    5
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    24|
    17th
    |
    110
    |
    11
    |
    6
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    25|
    17th
    |
    135
    |
    13
    |
    7
    |
    4
    |
    2
    |
    2
    [/table]

    Diplomatic Significance: An dignitary of 3rd level is recognized as a person of importance by dignitaries of other city-states or countries. This is a campaign detail rather than a game benefit. If the dignitary is injured, captured or killed, there will automatically be reprisals. An dignitary who has earned diplomatic significance can expect her household or city-state to look for her if she goes missing, rescue her if she gets into trouble and bail her out if she should run into trouble with the law.

    Authority: At 4th level, the dignitary begins to acquire the steely tone of voice and steady eye that characterizes a person who is used to being obeyed. She benefits from a +2 competence bonus to all Bluff and Presence checks.

    Evasive: The dignitary learns to stay out of the way of trouble. As she is not a combatant by nature, she has to make sure that she can survive if combat should find her. She receives the indicated bonus to all Active Defense checks.

    Aura of Importance: The dignitary is now self-evidently a person of power and influence, so much so that lesser characters find it hard to countenance the idea of harming her. Any character of lower level than the dignitary must succeed at a Will saving throw in order to attack her at all.
    If a character fails their saving throw, they cannot summon up the courage to attack the dignitary. The DC of the saving throw is 10 plus the dignitary’s level of experience. The saving throw may be made afresh with each passing round. Only other human beings are affected by the aura of importance, animals and undead creatures have no such compunctions about attacking such individuals and are not affected by this ability.

    Resolute: As the dignitary’s power grows, so too does her confidence. It becomes harder to unseat her by appealing to the Gods. The most entrenched of dignitaries come to consider themselves ‘as constant as the northern star’, coming dangerously close to risking the ire of the Gods with their faith in their own powers. The dignitary with this feature gains indicated bonus to Prayer checks made in concert with spending divine points, whether to oppose another’s attempt to reduce her own die rolls or to reduce those of another.

    Divine Audience: The dignitary is a figure of influence in the mortal world, which makes her very interesting to the Gods. She may open a direct channel to her deity. So long as the dignitary is not in disfavor with her deity, she may take an automatic result of 20 on a single Prayer check once per day. If playing a less mythic setting, Games Masters may prefer to represent this ability by replacing the deity with the ear of a powerful public figure. Doing so grants the dignitary an automatic result of 20 once per day to any single Presence check.

    Voice of Command: The dignitary’s inherent authority strengthens as she gains experience. The competence bonus she gains to Bluff and Presence checks is now +4.

    Majesty: Only those who become kings and queens of legend gain this ability. The character’s aura of importance has developed to mythic proportions. An dignitary with majesty has such presence that lesser characters fear to approach her, let alone attack him. A character who attempts to attack the dignitary and fails their saving throw may not simply try again next round. Instead, they are stricken with panic for 1d6 rounds plus the dignitary’s Charisma ability score modifier. A panicked character drops whatever they are holding and flees as fast as they can go away from the source of their fear, avoiding obstacles in the way. They can take no other actions and suffer a –2 penalty on saving throws, skill checks and ability score checks. If a panicked character is cornered, they cower and will use the total defense option if forced to fight.

    taken and modified from OGL: Ancient Kingdoms


    Qedeshot
    10 level advanced class

    An important player in the fertility religion of the Canaanites was the qedeshot (“Holy Ones”), the temple servants labeled “prostitutes” by the Biblical prophets. Referring to them as prostitutes does them disservice, for unlike common prostitutes who trade sex for money, qedeshot and qedeshem (their male counterparts) were honored religious figures and an essential part of the Canaanite community. The qedeshot is a variant bard and cleric, a priestess of Ishtar who performs sensual religious acts instead of music. Her power is derived from spells, dances, and kisses; she can also make people her thralls through acts of sensuality.

    (Note: Obviously the qedeshot is a sensitive topic. Ancient Canaanites may have thought cultic prostitutes perfectly natural, but modern players may be much less comfortable with them.)
    Spoiler
    Show
    Game Rule Information
    Abilities: Charisma is important for a qedeshot’s spells and many of her skills. Intelligence is also important for qedeshot skills. As they typically wear no armor, Charisma and Dexterity give qedeshots much-needed Armor Class bonuses.
    Alignment: Any
    Abbreviation: Qed
    Hit Die: d8
    Starting Age: 15 + 2d6

    Requirements:
    need to determine

    Class Skills
    Skill Points at Each Level: 4 + Int modifier
    Class Skills: The qedeshot’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Bluff (Cha), Concentration (Con), Diplomacy (Cha), Gather Information (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (agriculture) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Listen (Wis), Perform (Cha), Prayer (Cha), Profession (Wis), Spot (Wis), and Spellcraft (Int).

    The Qedeshot
    {table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

    1st|
    +0
    |
    +0
    |
    +2
    |
    +2
    |Charisma defense, dance 1/day

    2nd|
    +1
    |
    +0
    |
    +3
    |
    +3
    |Brew oils, Kiss 1/day

    3rd|
    +2
    |
    +1
    |
    +3
    |
    +3
    |Passion, Dance 2/day

    4th|
    +3
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |
    +4
    |Freedom of dance, kiss 2/day

    5th|
    +3
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |
    +4
    |dance 3/day

    6th|
    +4
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |
    +5
    |Carve Asherah pole, kiss 3/day

    7th|
    +5
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |
    +5
    |dance 4/day

    8th|
    +6
    |
    +2
    |
    +6
    |
    +6
    |Kiss 4/day

    9th|
    +6
    |
    +3
    |
    +6
    |
    +6
    |dance 5/day

    10th|
    +7
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |
    +7
    |Exalted dance, kiss 5/day[/table]

    Class Features
    All the following are features of the qedeshot class:

    Weapon & Armor Proficiency
    A qedeshot is proficient with simple weapons.

    Charisma Defense
    The qedeshot adds her Charisma modifier (if positive) to her Armor Class when she’s unarmored.

    Dance
    A qedeshot may dance once per day at 1st level, and may perform one additional dance for every three levels she’s attained. Unless stated otherwise, a dance lasts up to one round per level of the qedeshot and dancing requires a standard action each round. If she suffers any damage while dancing, she must make a Concentration check; failure ends the dance immediately. The effects of a qedeshot’s dances only affect human subjects.

    • Fascinate: A qedeshot with three or more ranks in Perform can cause a single person to become fascinated with her. The person to be fascinated must be able to see the qedeshot, be within 30 ft., and be capable of paying attention. Distraction (e.g., from a nearby combat or other dangers) prevents this ability from working. The qedeshot makes a Perform check, opposed by the subject’s Will save. If she fails, she cannot attempt to fascinate that person again for 24 hours. If her check succeeds, the target stares attentively at her for up to one round per level of the qedeshot. While fascinated, the subject suffers a -4 penalty to Spot and Listen checks. Any potential threat (e.g., an ally of the qedeshot moving behind the fascinated person) forces another opposed check. Any obvious threat (e.g., casting a spell, drawing a sword, or aiming) automatically breaks the effect.

    • Inspiration: A qedeshot with six or more ranks in Perform can help her allies in battle. While maintaining this dance, all allies within 30 ft. of the qedeshot able to see her dance receive a +1 competence bonus on their attack rolls and on all saving throws.

    • Sanctuary: A qedeshot with nine or more ranks in Perform can dance a sanctuary dance. While maintaining this dance, the qedeshot and one designated person within 5 ft. of her are treated as though they are protected by a sanctuary spell. The qedeshot must remain within 5 ft. of the protected person at all times and the sanctuary is broken (and the dance is ended) if the protected person attacks. The Will save required by an attacker intent on penetrating the sanctuary is opposed by the qedeshot’s Perform check.

    • Pain: A qedeshot with 12 or more ranks in Perform can dance the dance of pain. If she gets within 5 ft. of a victim while performing this dance, the qedeshot makes a Perform check opposed by the victim’s Will save. If the qedeshot is successful, the subject suffers 1d4 points damage, plus 1 point per qedeshot level. Multiple opponents can be affected by the dance of pain, but an individual can only be wounded by this ability once per round.

    • Damnation: A qedeshot with 15 or more ranks in Perform can dance the dance of the damned. She must spend two rounds performing an uninterrupted dance, and then stop within 5 ft. of her victim and point an accusatory finger at him. Once the accusation is made, all humans and demi-humans within 40 ft. who witnesses the dance (including the accusation) must make Will saves opposed by the qedeshot’s Perform check or immediately attack the “damned” with the intent to kill him. This effect lasts for three rounds, plus one round per point of the qedeshot’s Charisma bonus.

    • Death: A qedeshot with 18 or more ranks of Perform can dance the dance of death. She must spend three rounds performing an uninterrupted dance, after which she stops within 5 ft. of her victim. The qedeshot makes a Perform check opposed by the victim’s Will save. If the qedeshot is successful, the victim dies. If the qedeshot’s check is failed, the victim still suffers 4d8 points damage, plus 1 point per qedeshot level.

    Spells
    A qedeshot casts divine spells. She may prepare and cast any spell on the qedeshot spell list, provided she can cast spells of that level; to cast a spell, a qedeshot must have a Charisma score of 10 + the spell’s level. Charisma determines the number of bonus spells available each level. The difficulty class of a saving throw against a qedeshot’s spells is 10 + the spell’s level + the qedeshot’s Charisma modifier. Each qedeshot must choose a time at which she must spend an hour each day in quiet supplication to regain her daily allotment of spells. Time spent resting has no effect on whether she can prepare spells. A qedeshot selects two domains: one must be Fertility, and the other is chosen from among the other domains of her deity: Animal, Heaven, and Plant. She selects and casts domain spells as per other clerics. She also gets the granted powers of both her selected domains.

    Qedeshot Spells Per Day
    {table=head]Qedeshot Level|Spell Level 0|Spell Level 1|Spell Level 2|Spell Level 3|Spell Level 4|Spell Level 5

    1st|
    3
    |
    2+1
    |
    1+1

    2nd|
    3
    |
    2+1
    |
    2+1

    3rd|
    3
    |
    3+1
    |
    2+1

    4th|
    3
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    1+1

    5th|
    3
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    2+1

    6th|
    4
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    2+1

    7th|
    4
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    1+1

    8th|
    4
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    2+1

    9th|
    4
    |
    4+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    2+1

    10th|
    4
    |
    4+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    3+1
    |
    1+1
    [/table]
    In addition to the stated number of spells per day for 1st- through 5th-level spells, a qedeshot gets one domain spell of each spell level, starting at 1st. The “+1” on this list represents that. This is in addition to any bonus spells for having a high Charisma.

    Spontaneous Casting
    A qedeshot can cast convert prepared spells into cure or inflict spells as per other clerics.

    Create Magic Items
    A qedeshot may not take any Item Creation feats, but she can make a limited range of magic items through her Carve Asherah Pole and Brew Oils abilities, gained at 6th and 2nd level respectively.

    Kiss
    At 2nd level, a qedeshot, can bestow bonuses on an individual with a magical kiss once per day. An additional kiss is gained every two levels. The effects of a kiss last three rounds, plus one round per level of the qedeshot. The qedeshot’s kisses only affect human subjects, and she cannot kiss herself. After the subject has been kissed, the qedeshot can perform actions to cause any or all of the following effects within the duration of her kiss:

    • The qedeshot can cast spells that boosts attack rolls, Armor Class, or saving throws (e.g., bless), with the target receiving an additional +1 bonus for the duration of the kiss; for thralls (see Passion below) the bonus is increased to +2.

    • The qedeshot can cast attribute-boosting spells (such as bull’s strength or cat’s grace), with the target receiving an additional +2 bonus; for thralls, this is increased to +4.

    • The qedeshot can cast healing spells, with the target receiving a bonus of +2 hit points/die; he also receives +2 to all Heal checks made for him. For thralls, the healing bonus is boosted to +3.

    • She can perform her inspiration dance, causing the target to receive a +2 bonus. In addition, if she kisses a thrall and she’s then threatened, his attack and damage bonus is raised to +4 for the duration of the kiss.

    • She can cast touch range spells that receive a +2 DC bonus.

    Passion
    At 3rd level, a qedeshot can make someone her thrall through sexual intercourse. The qedeshot makes a Perform check opposed by the victim’s Will save. If she is successful, the target becomes her thrall. In order to attack, disobey, or lie to the qedeshot, the thrall must make a Will save (DC 10 + the qedeshot’s level + qedeshot’s Charisma modifier). A thrall has a -4 penalty to saves against a qedeshot’s spells or spell-like abilities. If a qedeshot is attacked or obviously in danger, her thrall gets +2 to all attack and damage rolls made while defending her. A qedeshot can take a weapon and use an action to wound herself during a round; if she remains conscious, she can channel the hit points she lost into any thrall within 30 ft.. Additional hit points fade in one hour, or at the moment that the qedeshot’s wound is healed, whichever comes first. A break enchantment spell or the death of the qedeshot liberates her thralls. At 3rd level, the qedeshot may hold one person. Every two levels thereafter, she may hold an addition person (2 at 5th-level, 3 at 7th level, and 4 at 9th level). Only humans or half-nephilim can be thralls. A person cannot be enthralled by two qedeshots at the same time.

    Freedom of Dance
    At 5th level, when a qedeshot performs one of her special dances, she is protected as if by a freedom of movement spell. Furthermore, while performing a dance, she cannot be flanked or caught flat-footed except by a rogue at least four levels higher.

    Carve Asherah Pole
    The Asherah pole was the phallus-shaped wooden symbol of the goddess Asherah, raised to venerate her temples. At 6th level, a qedeshot may construct an Asherah pole (5 hp/qedeshot level, hardness 5), taking seven days, 500 gp worth of material, and 100 XP. An Asherah pole cannot be moved from the site where it is first erected without losing all its special abilities. If the pole is ever removed or destroyed, the qedeshot loses 200 XP/level. A qedeshot can spend one day and 25 XP/spell level to store a qedeshot spell in her Asherah pole. A maximum of one spell per three levels may be stored in a pole. The spells may be unleashed as a standard action, or as a Quickened action if she is performing one of her special dances. Once cast, the spell is expended, and is no longer present in the pole. The qedeshot can call a spell from an Asherah pole at a range of one mile per level. At 8th level, while within one mile per level, the qedeshot can merge her senses with her Asherah pole, allowing her to see and hear through its head. She can also speak through the pole. If she’s projecting her senses and sense-affecting magic (such as blindness) is used on the pole, she suffers the spell’s effects as if she were physically present. At 9th level, a qedeshot can go to her Asherah pole and cast one divination spell per day and one commune spell per week. If successful, the Asherah pole answers her questions in the voice of the goddess.At 10th level, a qedeshot can project spells through the pole, casting them as if she were physically present. She cannot animate the pole, but she can project touch range spells within 5 ft. of the pole.

    Brew Oils
    At 2nd level, for personal use, a qedeshot can brew any potion as an oil, which must be applied to her body. In addition, the qedeshot can also prepare incense of meditation.

    Exalted Dance
    At 10th level, the qedeshot achieves an exalted state while she dances. While in this state, she no longer draws an attack of opportunity from any opponent, nor does she need to make a Concentration check to maintain a dance if she’s wounded.

    Qedeshot Spell List
    0 level: create water, cure minor wounds, detect magic, flare, guidance, mending, purify food and drink, ray of frost, resistance, virtue
    1st level: alarm, allure*, augury, bless, cause fear, charm person, command, cure light wounds, endurance, expeditious retreat, mage armor, message, obscuring mist, passion play*, pass without trace, protection from chaos/evil/good/law, sanctuary, sleep, unseen servant
    2nd level: animal messenger, animal trance, blindness/deafness, blur, bull’s strength, cat’s grace, cure moderate wounds, delay poison, emotion, enthrall, increase fertility*, misdirection, scare, silence, speak with animal, suggestion, token of romance*, water into wine*
    3rd level: bestow curse*, blink, charm monster, coming of age*, confusion, contagion*, cramps*, cure serious wounds, dispel magic, dominate animal, fear, haste, lesser geas, magic circle against chaos/evil/good/ law, plant growth, remove curse, remove disease, scrying, slow, speak with plants
    4th level: anti-plant shell, bestow affliction*, break enchantment, control plants, cure critical wounds, curtain of charm*, detect scrying, divination, greatness of tribe*, hold monster, modify memory, neutralize poison, remove affliction*, untiring*
    5th level: commune, control water, death ward, false vision, fertile womb*, greater dispelling, hallow, healing circle, inspire true love*, mind fog, nightmare, shatter true love*, wall of thorns

    *This spell is unique to the Testament setting.

    taken and modified from Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-03 at 11:01 AM. Reason: added Quedeshot class

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Magus of the Starry Host
    15 level advanced class

    The magi of the starry host are the wizards of Kudur. They do not use spellbooks to memorize spells, and cannot use scrolls. Instead, they observe
    the heavens and find magical wisdom in the motion of stars and planets. Magi are as much scientists as wizards. They seldom dwell in one place for long, but wander the world, looking for interesting phenomena and omens.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Game Rule Information
    Abilities: As arcane spellcasters, magi require high Intelligence scores for the maximum level of their spells, the number of bonus spells available each level, and the difficulty of saves against them. Magi are teachers and wise men, so high Wisdom scores are also important. As they typically wear no armor, high Dexterity can be useful. High Constitution gives them much-needed bonus hit points.
    Alignment: Any
    Abbreviation: Mgs
    Hit Die: d4
    Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier
    Class Skills: The magus of the starry host’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Craft (Alchemy) (Int), Concentration (Con), Diplomacy (Cha), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (astrology) (Int), Knowledge (engineering) (Int), Knowledge (history) (Int), Knowledge (local) (Int), Knowledge (mathematics) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Profession (Wis), Spellcraft (Int), and Survival (Int).

    Requirements
    Still need to be determined

    Magus of the Starry Host
    {table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

    1st|
    +0
    |
    +0
    |
    +0
    |
    +2
    |Domain spell, spells in the heavens, Compound Wondrous Incense

    2nd|
    +1
    |
    +0
    |
    +0
    |
    +3
    |Spell pilgrimage

    3rd|
    +1
    |
    +1
    |
    +1
    |
    +3
    |Lore pilgrimage

    4th|
    +2
    |
    +1
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |Brew potion

    5th|
    +2
    |
    +1
    |
    +1
    |
    +4

    6th|
    +3
    |
    +2
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |Lore pilgrimage

    7th|
    +3
    |
    +2
    |
    +2
    |
    +5

    8th|
    +4
    |
    +2
    |
    +2
    |
    +6
    |Scrying star

    9th|
    +4
    |
    +3
    |
    +3
    |
    +6
    |Lore pilgrimage

    10th|
    +5
    |
    +3
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |Nondetection

    11th|
    +5
    |
    +3
    |
    +3
    |
    +7

    12th|
    +6
    |
    +4
    |
    +4
    |
    +8
    |Lore pilgrimage, Observatory

    13th|
    +6
    |
    +4
    |
    +4
    |
    +8

    14th|
    +7
    |
    +4
    |
    +4
    |
    +9

    15th|
    +7
    |
    +5
    |
    +5
    |
    +9
    |Lore pilgrimage[/table]

    Class Features
    All the following are features of the magus of the starry host class.

    Weapon & Armor Proficiency
    Magi of the starry host are skilled with club, dagger, and quarterstaff.

    Spells
    A 1st-level magus of the starry host knows the celestial secrets behind casting all 0-level wizard spells, three 1st-level spells of his choice, plus one additional 1st-level spell per point of his Int bonus. The only way for him to learn new spells is through spell pilgrimages (see below). A magus’s spells are arcane, but he doesn’t record them on tablets or scrolls, but instead internalizes the knowledge of the heavens. This enables him to cast any spell he knows without preparing them in advance. Magi of the starry host receive bonus spells for high Intelligence, and to cast a spell a magus must have an Intelligence score at least equal to 10 + the level of the spell. The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a magus’s spell is 10 + the spell’s level + the caster’s Intelligence modifier.

    Domain Spell
    A magus of the starry host can cast spells from the Heaven domain as if they were arcane spells of the same level.

    Spells in the Heavens
    A magus dedicates his magic to a single star (usually a northern star that is in the sky year-round in the Northern Hemisphere, although this may be a serious impediment if he’s forced to travel to the Southern Hemisphere). By concentrating on that star for an hour as it moves in the night sky, he renews expended spell slots.

    Compound Wondrous Incense
    A magus is able to make wondrous incense, a magical incense that fills an area with a dweomer that affects everyone who breathes it. It requires four hours, a Craft (Alchemy) check (DC 13), and 50 gp in supplies to make one ounce of wondrous incense.

    Spell Pilgrimage
    A magus cannot copy spells from spellbooks to add to his repertoire, but beginning at 2nd level he can discover new magics by making pilgrimages to special locations. The magus can calculate the viewing location of a celestial phenomena and when it may be viewed to gain magical power. If he travels to that spot (1d100 x spell level miles from the magus’ home base) at the proper time (1d20 x spell level days from the time he determines the event), he gains the knowledge of a spell, which is added to his repertoire.

    The magus determines the level of the spell he’d like to learn. He must then make a Knowledge (astrology) check of DC 25 + the level of the spell (he cannot take 20 on the roll, though he may take 10). If he fails, he loses the opportunity to learn the spell at this time and may not attempt another roll for seven days. If he’s successful, he knows the time and place where he needs to be to gain the power. Once he views the phenomena, he gains the new spell knowledge.

    Only one new spell may be learned in a month. Magic may not be used to significantly augment the journey (i.e., the magus may use a dimension door spell to save his life in a fight with a monster, but cannot just teleport to the location of the celestial phenomena); the pilgrimage is an essential part of the experience. The GM should award XP to the magus if the quest is completed.

    (Note: Other magi may be attracted to the same phenomena. Those granting knowledge of low-level spells are commonplace occurrences, but celestial events allowing insight into high-level spells are rarer, and thus not events to be lightly missed.)


    Arcane Spells per Day
    {table=head]Magus Level|0th Level|1st level|2nd level|3rd level|4th level|5th level|6th level|7th level|8th level|9th level

    1st|
    4
    |
    3
    |
    2

    2nd|
    4
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    3rd|
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2

    4th|
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    5th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2

    6th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    7th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2

    8th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    9th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2

    10th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    11th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2

    12th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    13th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2

    14th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    2
    |
    1

    15th|
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    2
    [/table]

    Lore Pilgrimage
    A magus can make pilgrimages to special locations where the heavens will reveal powerful lore to him. The magus can calculate the location of a celestial phenomena that will allow him to either receive 4+Int bonus extra skill points, or learn a bonus metamagic feat (magus’ choice), and when it may be viewed to gain the lore. If he travels to that spot (2d20 x caster level miles from the magus’ home base) at the proper time (1d20 x caster level days from the time he determines the event), he gains the knowledge of a spell, which is added to his repertoire. The base Knowledge (astrology) check DC is 30. If he fails, he may not attempt to calculate a new lore opportunity for seven days. If he’s successful, he knows the time and place where he needs to be to gain the lore. Once he views the phenomena, he gains the benefits. As with a spell pilgrimage, magic may not be used to significantly augment the journey. The GM should award XP to the magus if the quest is completed.

    Once he’s successfully made a lore pilgrimage, a magus may not make another until he reaches a level that gives him a new opportunity (3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th, and 15th). There is no restriction as to when he can make a lore pilgrimage when he’s eligible for one; if he delays his 3rd-level pilgrimage until after he’s reached 8th level, he may still make it then.

    Brew Potion
    At 4th level, a magus learns to Brew Potion as a bonus feat.

    Scrying Star
    At 8th level, a magus of the starrry host may cast scry without expending a spell slot if his star is clearly visible in the sky. In periods of reduced celestial visibility (e.g., daytime or under clouded skies), he can only receive this ability after making a Knowledge (astrology) check (DC 20) to determine exactly where his star would be if not for the occluding condition.

    Nondetection
    At 10th level, a magus gains nondetection as per the spell, only when his star is clearly visible in the night sky.

    Observatory
    At 12th level, a magus can build an observatory (minimum cost 50,000 gp) in the form of a small step pyramid (ziggurat). If spells are prepared from within the observatory, their DCs are raised by +1. In addition, Knowledge (astrology) rolls (including those for spell and lore pilgrimages) receive a +2 bonus.

    taken and modified from Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era


    Master Charioteer
    10 level advanced class

    No other position in the armies of Kudur holds as much luster as that of charioteer. While every city-state has chariots, those of Isin and Gibil were the acknowledged best. And charioteers who show special mastery of their task may receive special training to become some of the leading warriors of their city-state.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Game Rule Information
    Abilities: Handling chariots and chariot animals requires skill and a good Dexterity. As charioteers can also serve as battlefield leaders, a high Charisma score is also recommended.
    Abbreviation: MCh
    Hit Die: d10

    Requirements
    Base Attack Bonus: +7
    Skills: Handle Animal (6 ranks), Knowledge (military tactics) (4 ranks), Ride (8 ranks)
    Feats: Weapon Focus (shortbow or composite shortbow), Trample, Skill Focus (Ride [chariot])

    Class Skills
    Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier
    Class Skills: The master charioteer’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (Dex), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Handle Animal (Cha), Heal (Wis), Knowledge (military tactics) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Profession (Wis), and Ride (chariot) (Dex).

    The Master Charioteer
    {table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Increased Chariot Speed|Special

    1st|
    +1
    |
    +0
    |
    +2
    |
    +0
    |+5 ft./round

    2nd|
    +2
    |
    +0
    |
    +3
    |
    +0
    |+5 ft./round|Improved Trample

    3rd|
    +3
    |
    +1
    |
    +3
    |
    +1
    |+5 ft./round

    4th|
    +4
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |+10 ft./round|Quick Reins

    5th|
    +5
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |+10 ft./round

    6th|
    +6
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |
    +2
    |+10 ft./round|Improved Cover

    7th|
    +7
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |
    +2
    |+15 ft./round

    8th|
    +8
    |
    +2
    |
    +6
    |
    +2
    |+15 ft./round|Steed Kill

    9th|
    +9
    |
    +3
    |
    +6
    |
    +3
    |+15 ft./round

    10th|
    +10
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |
    +3
    |+20 ft./round|Crippling Shot[/table]

    Class Features
    All the following are features of the master charioteer prestige class:

    Weapon & Armor Proficiency
    A master charioteer is proficient with all simple and martial weapons, all types of armor, and shields.

    Increased Chariot Speed
    Even if he is not driving the chariot himself, a master charioteer can increase the chariot’s speed if he makes a successful Ride (Chariot) check (DC 15). A check must be made each time the charioteer attempts to increase speed.

    Improved Trample
    Beginning at 2nd level, if a master charioteer performs a trample with his chariot, it does bonus damage equal to his class level and the driver receives a bonus on his Ride check equal to the master charioteer’s class level to avoid toppling the chariot.

    Quick Reins
    At 4th level, the master charioteer can move between positions (driver, shieldbearer, charioteer) as a free action.

    Improved Cover
    At 6th level, a master charioteer becomes particularly adept at using his chariot for cover. Cover on the side protected by the shieldbearer increases from three-quarters to nine-tenths, and cover on the opposite side increases from one-quarter to one-half.

    Steed Kill
    At 8th level, a master charioteer becomes particularly adept at killing steeds that are being used for riding or pulling chariots. If he studies a steed for three rounds and successfully hits with a ranged attack, the steed must make a Fortitude save (DC 15 + the master charioteer’s class level) or die.

    Crippling Shot
    At 10th level, on a critical hit, a master charioteer’s ranged attacks also cause crippling strikes, dropping their target’s Strength by 1 point. Targets reduced to 0 Strength are immobilized.

    taken and modified from Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era


    Desert Lord
    5 level advanced class

    Lone wanderers, seekers of lost cities, guardians of secret oases; the desert lords are individuals who have become one with the harsh and unforgiving environment of the desert. Desert Lords eschew the life of city-dwellers, and tend to live nomadic lives. They are at home in the desolate wastes, where they have freedom to roam as they please. Good-aligned desert lords sometimes provide assistance to desert travelers who are in need of aid, while evil ones often scavenge nameless, dried-out corpses like desert jackals.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Game Rule Information
    Alignment: Any non-lawful
    Hit Die: d8.

    Requirements
    To qualify to become a desert lord, a character must fulfill all the following criteria.
    Feats: Endurance.
    Skills: Ride 8 ranks, Survival 8 ranks.

    Class Skills
    The desert lord’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Craft (Int), Escape Artist (Dex), Handle Animal (Cha), Hide (Dex), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Profession (Wis), Ride (Dex), Spot (Wis), Survival (Wis), and Tumble (Dex).
    Skill Points at Each Level: 4 + Int modifier.

    Desert Lord
    {table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

    1st|
    +0
    |
    +2
    |
    +0
    |
    +2
    |Cloak of the desert, summon mount

    2nd|
    +1
    |
    +3
    |
    +0
    |
    +3
    |Sneak attack (+1d6), vermin immunity

    3rd|
    +2
    |
    +3
    |
    +1
    |
    +3
    |Throat of the camel

    4th|
    +3
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |Speak with desert, sneak attack (+2d6)

    5th|
    +3
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |Summon sandstorm[/table]

    Class Features
    All of the following are class features of the desert lord prestige class.

    Weapon and Armor Proficiency
    Desert lords are proficient with all simple and martial weapons, with light and medium armor, and with shields (except tower shields).

    Cloak of the Desert (Ex)
    A 1st-level desert lord does not suffer the usual –4 penalty to Constitution checks when wearing heavy clothing or armor in hot climates (see “Heat Dangers” in the DMG).

    Summon Mount (Ex)
    As often as once per week, a 1st-level desert lord can summon a mount, typically a light horse or camel (dromedary). If the desert lord already has a mount, the summoning fails. The maximum range of the summoning is 10 miles per prestige class level. The mount travels towards the desert lord at its normal mode of movement; therefore, it might be hours or days before the summoned mount reaches the desert lord.

    Sneak Attack (Ex)
    A 2nd-level desert lord can perform sneak attacks with +1d6 points of bonus damage. This is exactly like the rogue ability of the same name. If the Desert Lord gets a sneak attack bonus from another source the bonuses on damage stack. At 4th level, the sneak attack damage increases to 2d6 points of bonus damage.

    Vermin Immunity (Su)
    Starting at 2nd level, the desert lord is surrounded by a permanent repel vermin aura, with effective caster level equal to the prestige class level + 1. The effect can be dispelled, but the desert lord can re-activate it as a free action.

    Throat of the Camel (Ex)
    A 3rd-level desert lord requires significantly less sustenance than others of his kind. Normally, a character can go without food for 3 days, and without water for 1 day plus a number of hours equal to his Constitution score, before having to make Constitution checks for thirst and starvation (see “Starvation and Thirst” in the DMG). The desert lord can survive without food and water for an additional day per prestige class level. For example, a 3rd-level desert lord with Con 16 can survive without water for 4 days and 16 hours before having to make Constitution checks against thirst.

    Speak With Desert (Sp)
    Starting at 4th level, the desert lord can employ commune with nature as a spell-like ability, 1/day, with caster level equal to his prestige class level. The ability can only be used in a desert environment.

    Summon Sandstorm (Su)
    At 5th level, the desert lord is able to call upon to the desert winds, which manifest as a greater duststorm (see “Weather” in the DMG). The duststorm appears in 1d10+10 minutes and lasts for 2d4-1 hours. The ability can only be used outdoors in a desert environment, up to once per week. It takes a full round to use this ability. The desert lord himself gains no special protection against the sandstorm.

    taken from Ancient Kingdoms: Mesopotamia
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-06 at 09:43 AM. Reason: added desert lord

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    Troll in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Whoot! You can get personal firearms proficiency by having a Rural career!

    :)

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    I didn't say it was the most accurate list; just something to use as a primary reference. I'm doing my best to clean up my stuff, though. :-)

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    I have added the Qedeshot advanced class - please look it over, and if you can help me out with the requirements needed, I'd welcome the help.

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    I just finished adding the Magus of the Starry Host class. Can anyone help me determine what the requirements should be for the class?

    And anyone have any fluff they'd like to add to the setting locations above?

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    And there's another advanced class - the Master Charioteer. I wonder if it would be helpful to post each of these advanced classes in its own thread, and just have the links appear here... it would give people less to slog through, per thread. Any thoughts?

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    Dwarf in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    I have only skimmed through this, but I really like it! Keep it coming
    My Skill-Based Magic System!
    Complete, except for some world-specific stuff.

    NOTHING
    Transmutation
    Level: Sor/Wiz 5
    Components: V, S, M
    Casting Time: 1 standard action
    Range: Long (400 ft. + 40 ft./level)
    Area: 20-ft.-radius spread
    Duration: Instantaneous
    Saving Throw: Will negates
    Spell Resistance: Yes

    Absolutely nothing happens. Everyone get on with their lives.
    Material Components: Several large and healthy camels.

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    Halfling in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    I've added the Desert Lord class - I'm not certain if it should be prestige or advanced, however. As I've run out of room in the early posts, I'm going to continue adding advanced classes in this post, starting first with the priest/priestess. Also, thanks for your support - I'm glad my work here is appreciated!

    Priest
    15 level advanced class

    The priest or priestess of any of the deities of Kudur focuses on the use of the Prayer skill, the making of necessary sacrifices and the interpretation of the will of the gods. Such characters are vital for ensuring the success of a venture, as to offend the gods is to invite chaos. The priesthood is essential to ancient Sumerian society, as the gods are believed to watch the deeds of mankind constantly. Each priest or priestess is affiliated to a temple. They are expected to take part in rituals of worship, accept sacrifices from worshippers and defend the faith from the assaults of foreigners or even from those who follow other deities, should their interests clash. Travelling priests must make sure that their deities are properly propitiated when they need to be. All priests are given a teraph of their deity upon taking up their mantle.
    Spoiler
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    Game Rule Information
    Hit Die: d6.

    Class Skills
    The Greek Priest’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con), Heal (Wis), Knowledge (history) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Listen (Wis), Prayer (Wis) and Diplomacy (Cha).
    Skill Points at Each Level: 4 + Int modifier.

    PRIESTS OF ENZUABU also have Bluff (Cha) and Appraise (Int) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENGIBIL also have Bluff (Cha) and Knowledge (tactics & strategy) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENISIN also have Survival (Wis) and Ride (Dex) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENEKUR also have Spot (Wis) and Sense Motive (Wis) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENIAGGASHER also have Medicine (Int) as a class skill.
    PRIESTS OF ENINUG also have Craft (any) and Knowledge (architecture and engineering) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENIKI also have Knowledge (nature) (Int) and Craft (Herbalism) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENANU also have Presence (Cha) and Search (Wis) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENLIL also have Bluff (Cha) and Disguise (Cha) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENBILULU also have Ride (Dex) and Swim (Str) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENINAMMAH also have Craft (Herbalism) (Int) and Hide (Dex) as class skills.
    PRIESTS OF ENUTU also have Climb (Str) and Jump (Str) as class skills.

    The Priest
    {table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

    1st|
    +0
    |
    +0
    |
    +2
    |
    +2
    |Literate, Request Miracle

    2nd|
    +1
    |
    +0
    |
    +3
    |
    +3

    3rd|
    +2
    |
    +1
    |
    +3
    |
    +3
    |Free Miracle

    4th|
    +3
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |
    +4

    5th|
    +3
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |
    +4

    6th|
    +4
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |
    +5
    |Free Miracle

    7th|
    +5
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |
    +5

    8th|
    +6
    |
    +2
    |
    +6
    |
    +6

    9th|
    +6
    |
    +3
    |
    +6
    |
    +6
    |Free Miracle

    10th|
    +7
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |
    +7
    |Improved Teraph

    11th|
    +8
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |
    +7

    12th|
    +9
    |
    +4
    |
    +8
    |
    +8
    |Free Miracle

    13th|
    +9
    |
    +4
    |
    +8
    |
    +8

    14th|
    +10
    |
    +4
    |
    +9
    |
    +9

    15th|
    +11
    |
    +5
    |
    +9
    |
    +9
    |Free Miracle[/table]

    Class Features
    All of the following are class features of the priest.

    Weapon and Armour Proficiency
    A priest is proficient with the club, dagger, quarterstaff, and his deity's sacred weapon. He is not proficient with any armor or shield.

    Literate
    Priests receive the Literate feat free at 1st level. They learn to read and inscribe their own language.

    Request Miracle
    A priest may use the Prayer skill to petition his deity for miracles.

    Free Miracle
    Upon reaching 3rd level, the priest is allowed to appeal his deity for one ‘free’ miracle a day. This miracle does not increase the DC of the next miracle for which the priest appeals, whether or not it is successful. Ordinarily, a successful miracle raises the DC of the next miracle that day by +2 and a failed miracle raises the DC of the next miracle by +1. A free miracle is, however, subject to the DC modifier incurred by previous appeals that day. The Greek priest is entitled to a further free miracle per day at 6th, 9th, 12th, and 15th level.

    Improved Teraph
    Upon reaching 10th level, any bonuses of their god's teraph are doubled for the priest. For instance, the teraph of Engibil normally grants a +1 to all knowledge checks. If a priest of Engibil reaches 10th level, their teraph grants a +2 bonus to all knowledge checks. This ability only holds true for the priest; if the teraph is given (or sold) to another, the teraph functions as normal.

    taken and modified from OGL: Ancients


    Spy
    15 level advanced class

    Spies were used for two purposes in the ancient world: externally, to gather information on hostile neighbors, to make sure apparently friendly neighbors were indeed friendly, and to make sure vassals were paying the proper tribute, and internally, to deal with palace intrigue and peasant unrest. While some rulers might have had qualms about employing rogues and assassins, spies were a necessity. Of course, enemy spies who were caught were given summary executions; being necessary doesn’t mean that spies were acceptable. Fleet of foot, the spy is difficult to strike in combat, and is able to beat a hasty retreat at a moment’s notice. The spy is also a fine diplomat, able to talk himself out of many difficult situations, and a specialized spellcaster, which provides him with additional edges.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Game Rule Information
    Abilities: Wisdom is an important ability for a spy’s perception abilities (and for an Armor Class bonus), Dexterity is useful for many of his skills and feats (and for an AC bonus), Intelligence is important for his spells and for the number of skill points he gains, and Charisma is useful for many of his diplomatic skills.
    Abbreviation: Spy
    Hit Die: d6

    Requirements
    still need to be determined

    Class Skills
    Skill Points at Each Level: 6 + Int modifier
    Class Skills: The spy’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Diplomacy (Cha), Disable Device (Int), Disguise (Cha), Escape Artist (Dex), Gather Information (Cha), Hide (Dex), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (military tactics) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Listen (Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Open Locks (Dex), Pick Pocket (Dex), Profession (Wis), Search (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Spot (Wis), Tumble (Dex), Use Rope (Dex), and Survival (Wis).

    The Spy
    {table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Unarmored Movement|Special

    1st|
    +0
    |
    +2
    |
    +0
    |
    +2
    |30 ft / 20 ft|Wisdom bonus to AC, Skill Focus (Gather Information), Protection from charm +2

    2nd|
    +1
    |
    +3
    |
    +0
    |
    +3
    |30 ft / 20 ft|Movement feat

    3rd|
    +2
    |
    +3
    |
    +1
    |
    +3
    |30 ft / 20 ft|Skill Focus: Perception

    4th|
    +3
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |30 ft / 20 ft|Concealment in plain sight ½

    5th|
    +3
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |30 ft / 20 ft|Protection from charm +3

    6th|
    +4
    |
    +5
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |40 ft / 25 ft|Movement feat

    7th|
    +5
    |
    +5
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |40 ft / 25 ft|Skill Focus: Social

    8th|
    +6
    |
    +6
    |
    +2
    |
    +6
    |40 ft / 25 ft

    9th|
    +6
    |
    +6
    |
    +3
    |
    +6
    |40 ft / 25 ft|Concealment in plain sight ¾, Protection from charm +4

    10th|
    +7
    |
    +7
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |40 ft / 25 ft|Movement feat

    11th|
    +8
    |
    +7
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |40 ft / 25 ft|Indomitable movement

    12th|
    +9
    |
    +8
    |
    +4
    |
    +8
    |40 ft / 25 ft|Skill Focus: Deception

    13th|
    +9
    |
    +8
    |
    +4
    |
    +8
    |50 ft / 35 ft|Protection from charm +5

    14th|
    +10
    |
    +9
    |
    +4
    |
    +9
    |50 ft / 35 ft|Movement feat, Concealment in plain sight 9/10

    15th|
    +11
    |
    +9
    |
    +5
    |
    +9
    |50 ft / 35 ft|Skill Focus: Any[/table]
    *Small and dwarf spies move at the slower listed speed.

    Class Features
    All the following are features of the spy class:

    Weapon & Armor Proficiency
    A spy is proficient with all simple and martial weapons, and all light and medium armor.

    Wisdom Bonus to AC
    Because spies rely on perception as much well as quick reflexes for defense, they add their Wisdom modifier as well as their Dexterity modifier to their Armor Class when wearing light or no armor. When caught flat-footed, this bonus does not apply.

    Skill Focus: Gather Information
    A spy notices things, even when they don’t seem particularly significant at the time. This eye for detail gives a spy Skill Focus (Gather Information) at 1st level as a bonus feat.

    Protection From Charm
    The will of a successful spy is difficult to break. At 1st level, a spy gains a +2 bonus on all saving throws vs. Enchantment spells and effects, which increases to a +3 bonus at 5th level, a +4 bonus at 9th level, and a +5 bonus at 13th level.

    Spells
    Beginning at 4th level, a spy gains the ability to cast a small number of arcane spells. To cast a spell, the spy must have an Intelligence score of at least 10 + the spell’s level. Spy bonus spells are based on Intelligence, and saving throws against these spells have a DC of 10 + spell level + the spy’s Intelligence modifier (if any). A spy learns, prepares, and casts spells just as a wizard does. Through 3rd level a spy has no caster level. Starting at 4th level, a spy’s caster level is one-half his class level.

    Spy Spells Cast Per Day
    {table=head]Level|Spell Level 1|Spell Level 2|Spell Level 3|Spell Level 4

    1st

    2nd

    3rd

    4th|
    0

    5th|
    0

    6th|
    1

    7th|
    1

    8th|
    1
    |
    0

    9th|
    1
    |
    0

    10th|
    1
    |
    1

    11th|
    1
    |
    1
    |
    0

    12th|
    1
    |
    1
    |
    1

    13th|
    1
    |
    1
    |
    1

    14th|
    2
    |
    1
    |
    1
    |
    0

    15th|
    2
    |
    2
    |
    1
    |
    1
    [/table]
    When a spy gets 0 spells of a given level, he gets only bonus spells.

    Skill Focus: Perception
    At 3rd level, a spy may take a bonus Skill Focus feat in one of the following skills: Listen, Search, Sense Motive, or Spot.

    Concealment in Plain Sight
    At 4th level, when he’s not immobilized, caught flat-footed, or surprised, a spy can use positioning to find concealment where none exists. This can only be used against a single opponent designated by the spy on his initiative count.

    The spy is concealed against this opponent until the opponent leaves the spy’s line of sight, or until the spy is unable to defend against him. This ability is negated if the selected opponent’s character level is three or more levels higher than the spy’s class level, or if the opponent has the Blind-Fight feat. At 4th level, the effective concealment is one-half (20% chance to miss), at 9th level, it improves to three-quarters (30% chance to miss), and at 14th level, it improves to nine-tenths (40% chance to miss).

    Skill Focus: Social
    At 7th level, a spy may take a bonus Skill Focus feat in one of the following skills: Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, or Sense Motive.

    Indomitable Movement
    At 11th level, a spy may move through an opponent’s threatened area without provoking an attack of opportunity.

    Skill Focus: Deception
    At 16th level, a spy may take a bonus Skill Focus feat in one of the following skills: Disguise, Hide, or Move Silently.

    Movement Feat
    At 2nd, 6th, 10th, and 14th levels, a spy gains one of the following as a bonus feat (provided he meets the qualifications): Dodge, Endurance, Improved Bull Rush, Lightning Reflexes, Mobility, Side Step (see p. 46), Spring Attack, Run.

    Spy Spell List
    1st level: comprehend languages, detect magic, detect poison, detect secret doors
    2nd level: detect thoughts, locate object, misdirection, obscure object, see invisibility
    3rd level: clairaudience/clairvoyance, nondetection, tongues
    4th level: arcane eye, detect scrying, locate creature, scrying

    taken and modified from Testament: Roleplaying in the Biblical Era


    Temple Reaver
    10 level advanced class

    The Alashkurri barbarians of the Zagros mountains revel in looting the rich temples and toppling the unsmiling stone idols of civilized men. But among these godless savages, who simply kill and plunder as a way of life, there are those who dedicate themselves to the eradication of religion. Fearfully called the temple reavers by the bearded priests of Mesopotamia, the mission of these iron-willed mountain men is to destroy the temples of the faithful, kill the priests, and massacre the servants of the gods. The temple reavers have no real organization, but often band together with their more savage brethren in raids to the south. By staying with the tribes, they also gain protection, for the cults of the civilized lands recognize the temple reavers as powerful threats and seek to hunt them down and destroy them whenever they are exposed.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Game Rule Information
    Hit Die: d8.
    Abbreviation: tmr

    Requirements
    Base Attack Bonus: +10.
    Skills: Knowledge (religion) 1 rank, Spellcraft 1 rank.
    Feats: Great Fortitude, Iron Will.
    Special: The temple reaver cannot worship any god. He must abandon his old faith, if any, with all the usual penalties for ceasing such worship. The character must also single handedly have slain a priest to take levels in this prestige class.

    Class Skills

    The temple reaver’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Climb (Str), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Handle Animal (Cha), Heal (Wis), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Profession (Wis), Ride (Dex), Spellcraft (Int), Survival (Wis), and Swim (Str).
    Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

    The Temple Reaver
    {table=head]Level|Base Attack Bonus|Fort Save|Ref Save|Will Save|Special

    1st|
    +1
    |
    +2
    |
    +0
    |
    +2
    |Renounce aid, detect faithful, fast healing 1 (20)

    2nd|
    +2
    |
    +3
    |
    +0
    |
    +3
    |Greater dispel magic (1/day)

    3rd|
    +3
    |
    +3
    |
    +1
    |
    +3
    |Smite faithful 1/day, fast healing 1 (30)

    4th|
    +4
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |Fast healing 1 (40)

    5th|
    +5
    |
    +4
    |
    +1
    |
    +4
    |Greater dispel magic (2/day)

    6th|
    +6
    |
    +5
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |Fast healing 1 (50)

    7th|
    +7
    |
    +5
    |
    +2
    |
    +5
    |Greater Spell Immunity (1/day)

    8th|
    +8
    |
    +6
    |
    +2
    |
    +6
    |Smite faithful (2/day), fast healing 1 (60)

    9th|
    +9
    |
    +6
    |
    +3
    |
    +6
    |Disjunction (1/day)

    10th|
    +10
    |
    +7
    |
    +3
    |
    +7
    |Essence of the universe, fast healing 1[/table]

    Class Features
    All of the following are class features of the temple reaver advanced class.

    Weapon and Armor Proficiency
    Temple reavers gain no proficiency with any weapon or armor.

    Renounce Aid (Ex)
    The temple reaver must attempt saving throws against all spells and abilities used on him by faithful creatures, if the spell or ability allows one. This also applies to beneficial (harmless) spells and abilities. For the purposes of this prestige class, a faithful creature is any creature that of its own will worships a god, or is itself a god.

    Detect Faithful (Sp)
    At will, the temple reaver can sense faithful creatures and spells. This ability works like the paladin’s detect evil ability, except that it detects the auras of faithful creatures, faithful clerics, and faithful spells, and the temple reaver is vulnerable to an overwhelming faithful aura.

    Fast Healing (Ex)
    The temple reaver regains hit points at an exceptionally fast rate. At 1st level, the character regains 1 hit point per round, to a maximum of 20 hit points per day. The maximum number of hit points restorable per day increases as shown on the table below (in parenthesis after the ability name). At 10th level, it works exactly like fast healing 1, with no limit to restorable hit points.

    Greater Dispel Magic (Sp)
    At 2nd level, as often as once per day, the temple reaver can use greater dispel magic with a caster level equal to 10 + prestige class level. This ability works like the spell, but only ends spells or effects cast or activated by faithful creatures. It can only suppress the properties of a magical item in the possession of a faithful creature. At 5th level, the temple reaver can use this ability twice per day.

    Smite Faithful (Su)
    Once per day, a temple reaver of 3rd level or higher may attempt to smite a faithful creature with one normal melee attack. He adds his Charisma modifier (if positive) to his attack roll and deals 1 extra point of damage per class level. If a temple reaver accidentally smites a non-faithful creature, the smite has no effect, but it is still used up for that day.

    At 8th level, the temple reaver may smite faithful creatures twice per day.
    Greater Spell Immunity (Sp): At 7th level, as often as once per day, the temple reaver can use greater spell immunity with a caster level equal to 10 + prestige class level. This ability works like the spell, but it only protects against spells cast by faithful creatures, spell-like effects of magic items activated by faithful creatures, and innate spell-like abilities of faithful creatures.

    Disjunction (Sp)
    At 9th level, as often as once per day, the temple reaver can use mage's disjunction with a caster level equal to 10 + prestige class level. This ability works like the spell, but it only affects magical effects cast or activated by faithful creatures. It can only destroy magical items or artifacts in the possession of faithful creatures, except that artifacts associated with a deity can be destroyed even when not in the possession of faithful creature. Unlike a normal spellcaster, the temple reaver is not required to make the saving throw to avoid losing spellcasting ability when destroying an artifact, but the character is still subject to the attention of powerful beings who are somehow connected with the artifact.

    Essence of the Universe
    At 10th level, the temple reaver merges his body and soul, and becomes an outsider. Hit Dice, base attack bonus, and saving throws are not recalculated. Some spells now affect the temple reaver differently. The character also gains darkvision out to 60 feet, and does not need to eat or sleep.

    taken and modified from Ancient Kingdoms: Mesopotamia
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-08 at 11:27 AM. Reason: added temple reaver class

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Added the Spy class. Can anyone tell me what requirements I should set for entry into any of the classes that don't have them already?

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    And another update - I have just one more class to add, and the advanced classes will be finished. After that, I plan to post the equipment list, along with how bonuses will be granted based on weapon type. Then, I'll get around to posting the feat list eventually too.

    Please help me out! I definately need fluff for a few cities, requirements for most of the advanced classes, and perhaps a comment or two about whether these classes will balance out.

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    Skills

    Prayer (Wis)
    Your ranks in the Prayer skill represent your affinity with the divine and your ability to contact your deity when you need to. Characters will mostly be using Prayer to oppose another’s attempts to reduce their die rolls with divine points. Priests and priestesses have the Request Miracle class feature, which enables them to use Prayer to petition their deity for miracles.

    Check: A Prayer check is made against a given DC to petition a deity for a miracle. This is a standard action requiring concentration and provokes an attack of opportunity.

    Religious Rituals: You make a Prayer check at DC 10 to carry out the basic religious rituals of your faith. If you are a priest, you may use this check to conduct services and similar rituals. It is also used to sanctify a corpse after death and prevent wicked spirits from claiming the body for their use.

    Reducing Another’s Roll With Divine Points: Opposed Prayer checks made when spending divine points to reduce another’s die roll are made as free actions.

    Warding Off and Dismissing Undead: You can pray to your deity for protection against the attacks of wicked spirits, including those that have been bound into a dead body, such as a composite. A more challenging prayer can be made to banish the corrupt spirit altogether, sending it from the material world into the afterlife. Discarnate creatures are dismissed, while creatures with bodies made from dead matter are destroyed and their animating spirits banished.

    Prayer checks made to ward off undead creatures or dismiss their troubled spirits are made against a DC of 10 plus the creature’s Hit Dice plus its manifestation bonus in the case of warding off or 15 plus the same variables in the case of dismissal. A Prayer check made to ward off or dismiss a creature is made as a standard action that requires concentration and provokes an attack of opportunity.

    Action: Religious rituals take one hour to perform.

    Try Again: Varies. You cannot attempt to perform funeral rites twice. Dedicate checks can be attempted again but the DC increases by one with each attempt.
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-11 at 02:55 PM.

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    Divine Points

    A key part of the mythic style of campaign is the interaction of the Gods with mortals. The flavor of the game demands a constant awareness of what the Gods have in mind. The conflicts of mortals in a mythic campaign almost always originate in some clash of interest in the celestial realms. The Gods of the ancient world do not sit behind clouds while human beings wonder whether they exist or not; they come down to earth and get their hands dirty, siring children, visiting mortals in disguise and involving themselves directly in battles.

    Spoiler
    Show
    The heroes in ancient myth are always calling upon their patron Gods and Goddesses to aid them, which they do in manifold ways. The battlefields of old rang with cries of ‘Horus, lord of Light, guide my spear!’ or ‘Vengeance in the name of Artemis!’ If the legends are to be believed, the Gods often answered those who called upon them. The Divine Points of a character represent the constant background presence of a deity who is willing to assist a devotee. By using Divine Points, you can perform incredible deeds, strike down powerful adversaries and make seemingly miraculous escapes.

    There are two ratings for Divine Points, being base and temporary. A character’s base Divine Points are equal to his level of experience. Other actions during the campaign can increase or decrease your base or temporary Divine Points. For example, if you gain the favor of your deity, your base Divine Points increase by 2 for as long as the favor lasts. The following rules cover the use of Divine Points.

    Spoiler
    Show
    * You may never have more temporary Divine Points than your base total. Special Divine Points do not however count towards your total, as they represent a favor granted by a different deity than the one you worship.

    * Your temporary Divine Points are equal to your base Divine Points at the beginning of each adventure.

    * You may spend temporary Divine Points to increase the result of any d20 die roll made by yourself on a one for one basis or to reduce the result of another person’s d20 die roll on the same basis. The only kind of d20 roll you cannot use Divine Points to influence is a skill check to request a miracle for the first or second time in your life.

    * Divine Points cannot be used to raise a roll made by anyone other than yourself.

    * Reducing another person’s roll requires an opposed Prayer check between yourself and the target. Only one expenditure of Divine Points may affect a single person for a given action; a group of people may not stand around someone and pile Divine Points on to him to make him fail a saving throw catastrophically badly.

    * You may not spend Divine Points to reduce another person’s use of Divine Points. For example, if you were a follower of Engibil, you could not reduce another’s Will saving throw result if he had already spent Divine Points to increase it.

    * Spending Divine Points is a free action.

    * If you ever change your deity, you lose all your Divine Points (except special Divine Points) and must start again.

    * Whether you are reducing the results of another person’s die roll or increasing your own, you must expend the points directly before the die roll is made. Divine Points cannot ordinarily be used to reduce a roll that has already been made. Only those who have the Divine Connection or Divine Smite feats are able to adjust die rolls after they have been made.

    * You can only reduce another person’s d20 die roll if your character (rather than the player) is directly aware of the action as it is unfolding. If the Pharaoh is attempting to shake off the effects of poison in the chamber next to you, you cannot spend Divine Points to reduce his saving throw unless you are aware of the situation. You do not have to see the events unfold in order to spend Divine Points. As a rule of thumb, assume that any event concerning which the character could mutter a prayer to their deity can be influenced by Divine Points.

    * You may only spend Divine Points once in any one round. You may not, for example, spend Divine Points to turn an ordinary attack roll into a critical threat and then spend more Divine Points to increase the critical threat check in order to be assured of a critical hit. Similarly, you may not spend Divine Points to increase both your Prayer skill check and reduce the Will saving throw of your target.

    * You may not spend Divine Points at all if the deity in question holds you in disfavor. You must make things right between yourself and your God before you once again become able to call on their assistance. You may not even know that your deity holds you in disfavor until you attempt to spend Divine Points and find that nothing happens. As Divine Points are an essential part of the game, a good tactic to use when overcoming an enemy is to make trouble between him and his God, so that the enemy falls into disfavor and is no longer able to call upon divine aid. The myths recount instances of unintentional blasphemy that crafty heroes have tricked adversaries into performing.

    For example, the priestess Chloe has only one chance to slay the corrupt Lugal of Engibil before the guards seize her; uttering a fervent prayer to Enimmursag, she spends all of her current Divine Points (of which she has seven) to add a +7 bonus to her attack roll, hoping that she will score a critical hit with her dagger. Alternatively, if the King had been teetering on the edge of a precipice, Chloe could have spent her Divine Points to reduce his Balance check result by –7, if she had succeeded in the opposed Prayer check. The character classes that have Prayer as a class skill, such as Priest, are thus are much better at forcing their deities’ wills upon other people.


    Your temporary Divine Points are much more likely to go down than to go up, as you call on your deity’s help at various stages during the course of the adventure. If you end an adventure with unspent Divine Points left over from the start, then you have not faced enough of a challenge! Players can attempt to increase their temporary Divine Point total by performing dedicated acts, for which see below. Increasing your base Divine Point total is extremely difficult and can only be achieved in one of three ways; by advancing an experience level, by building temples or huge statues to the deity or by performing a heroic quest in the deity’s name.

    There is one final rule covering all use of Divine Points. You must never spend Divine Points to carry out an action of which your deity would disapprove. The attempt to do so gains you the disfavor of that deity automatically. For example, if you were a devotee of Enimmursag and were fighting for your life against a fellow devotee of that grim and terrible goddess, you could invest Divine Points to increase your attack roll, as Enimmursag approves of survival of the strongest. However, if you were both followers of Eninug, to do so would be a blasphemy. This rule applies even if you did not know that what you were trying to do was offensive to your God. To the Immortals, ignorance is never an excuse. This is hardly fair by contemporary human standards; but then, they are the Gods!

    Favored Checks: Each deity has certain specific activities that they are particularly well able to assist with. For example, the priestesses of Eniaggasher are also healers, bestowing the mercy of that Goddess on those who suffer. Eniaggasher is especially ready to help those who call on her name when administering the healing arts. These realms of patronage are referred to as favored checks for the deity. When you spend Divine Points to influence a die roll for a check that is listed among the favored checks for your deity, you gain a +2 bonus per point instead of the usual +1.

    For example,
    Spoiler
    Show
    a follower of Eniaggasher who spent three temporary Divine Points to heal the son of the Ensi of a wasting disease would receive a +6 bonus to her Heal check, instead of a +3 bonus, as Heal checks are favored checks for Her priesthood.


    Negative Favored Checks: Some deities, usually the darker ones, have negative favored checks. This means that you receive no additional value when expending divine points to influence your own check positively, but you do receive a two-for-one bonus when influencing another’s check negatively.

    For example,
    Spoiler
    Show
    followers of Apophis the Serpent have Fortitude saving throws as a negative favored check. This means that a cultist of Apophis could expend two Divine Points to reduce another person’s Fortitude saving throw by –4, assuming he succeeded on the requisite opposed Prayer check. The sacred snakes in the temples of Apophis are venomous enough, but with the priests able to reduce the ability of their victims to resist the venom, they become truly terrible.


    Divine Points and Rolls of Natural 20: If you spend sufficient Divine Points to gain a +20 bonus on a given die roll, you may instead proceed as if you had rolled a natural 20. This may mean that you score a critical hit. In this case, the Divine Points you spent to gain your natural 20 do not give you any bonus on your critical check roll to see whether you scored a critical hit or a normal hit.

    For example,
    Spoiler
    Show
    at a critical point during the siege of Troy, Menelaus and Paris are fighting with spears and shields. Menelaus has 10 Divine Points remaining and, like many kings, is a devotee of Zeus. He hurls his javelin at Paris, uttering a swift prayer as he does so. Zeus has ‘melee attacks with thrown weapons’ as a favored check; Menelaus chooses to spend all 10 of his Divine Points, for an effective +20 bonus to his attack roll. Instead of rolling, he takes a natural 20 as his result, for a critical threat. This is, at the very least, an automatic hit, but it remains to be seen whether it is a critical hit or not.


    Special Divine Points: Only your deity may increase your base or temporary Divine Point pool. Other deities may approve of your actions and even grant you their favor or their love, but they cannot do more than grant you additional Divine Points. These are kept count of separately. Additional Divine Points may only be used to increase your own die rolls, not to reduce those of other people. They are like a small favor from the deity to yourself. You may not use Divine Points from more than one deity at the same time. If you ever earn the disfavor of the deity (or worse) then the additional divine points are lost.

    For example,
    Spoiler
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    the hero Tychus rescues the priestess Eleni from the clutches of a barbarian chieftain who had been planning to ravish her. As Eleni is a priestess of Artemis, this would have destroyed her ability to function as such, as Artemis only allows virgins into her priesthood. A grateful Artemis awards Tychus a blessing of five additional Divine Points. Tychus may expend these as he chooses and they do not return once spent; however, if he attempted to ravish Eleni himself, this would incur the disfavor of Artemis and the points would be lost.


    Total Divine Points Spent: Keep a record of the number of Divine Points your character spends. Those who spend large amounts over the course of their lives attract the attention of their deity, as they are clearly especially dedicated followers. It is impossible to spend a large number of Divine Points without constantly replenishing your Divine Point pool, so there is no other way to do this than to perform repeated, successful dedicated acts.


    Dedicating Acts
    You will not gain any especial favor from your deity just by keeping within the limits of the deity’s code and avoiding committing sins. Anyone can do that. Obedience to the code is the minimum required from any devotee, not the ideal. In order to attract the deity’s attention and increase your Divine Points significantly, temporary or permanent, you must deliberately perform suitable acts in the deity’s name. This takes a little explaining, as it is not a concept that a modern audience is likely to be familiar with. A dedicated act is one that is performed to give honor to a God. You must dedicate the act before you begin it; the idea is that your success in performing the act well and spectacularly is a testament to your faith in your deity. For example, a follower of Enimmursag might dedicate the death of a foe to his deity; a follower of Eninug could dedicate the building of a magnificent palace; a follower of Enzuabu could dedicate successfully stealing an expensive object; a follower of Engibil could dedicate a profitable trade expedition.

    Spoiler
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    A dedicated act always involves some element of gamble. It is as if you called your deity to watch what you were about to do, so that the deity can take pride in your performance. It is also necessary that other people should see your dedicated deeds, because in showing your own devotion, you are promoting your deity in front of those who believe in other Gods. There is always the possibility that you will fail. The dedicated act has to be a gamble or a challenge in order for the deity to appreciate it. If there is no risk, then the act cannot be a dedicated one.

    The Gods do not respect those who make inadequate gestures of devotion. If you were a follower of Eniaggasher and dedicated the death of a field mouse to her, she would spit upon your offering and probably transform you into a replacement field mouse to boot. The death of a wild bull, on the other hand, would be an acceptable tribute, especially if you had to fight it yourself. The more trouble your dedicated act causes for you, the more the deity is likely to appreciate it. For this reason, characters do not go around dedicating every foe they face or every task they undertake to their deities. Ordinary deeds do not give any especial glory to a deity. Gods like to look upon their followers doing great things in their name. Characters may seek out suitable acts that they can dedicate; this is in fact one of the reasons why characters go on quests and look for dangerous opponents on the battlefield. Increasing your base or current Divine Points is always a good idea.

    The dedicated act must of course be one which the God applauds. You can dedicate a theft of an object to Enzuabu and earn his praise, but you would be ill advised to dedicate such a theft to Enimmursag. Suitable acts that you may dedicate are given in the description of the codes of the deity.

    To make a dedicated act, a character simply announces aloud in the presence of at least one witness what they intend to do and the name of the deity in which he does it. This is a free action. You must define the act in such a way that failure is a possibility. It is perfectly legitimate to scream ‘Your life for Eniaggasher!’ just before you swing a blow at a foe, as you may miss. Dedicating the slaughter of a helpless creature (where the possibility of your failing to kill it is remote or nonexistent) counts as sacrifice rather than dedicated action and has its own section below.

    It is an old saying that the Gods love those most who ask their help the least. To gain temporary or permanent Divine Points from an act, you must perform it yourself, without help from anyone else, mortal or immortal. You are allowed to use Divine Points to fulfill a dedicated act but if you do this, you can gain no benefit from performing the act. Using Divine Points is better than failing outright and is usually done when a character realizes that he is having more trouble than he expected.

    Once you have dedicated an act, you must fulfill it to the letter. Although there is no time limit on completing dedicated acts, you may only have one dedicated act before you at once and you may not begin a new dedicated act until you have either completed the current one or admitted failure. If you fail in your dedicated action, the consequences are grim; see below.

    You are not deemed to have failed until it would be impossible for you to perform the act. For example, if during an archery contest you dedicated the precise striking of a target to Enisin and you missed, you would have failed. The task was limited to that arrow and that target. However, if you dedicated a foe’s life to Enimmursag but were struck unconscious during the battle, you would not have failed until the foe was dead by some cause other than your own hand. You could seek him out, demand a fight and satisfy Enimmursag by finishing the task. Remember that the act must be one of which the deity would approve; in the above example, you could not fulfill the task unless the opponent agreed to fight you, because striking down an unarmed opponent is a sin in the eyes of Enimmursag! You may, at any time, deem yourself to have failed in carrying out a dedicated act and accept the consequences. The moral here is to choose your dedicated acts carefully and not swear to achieve anything that is beyond your abilities.

    For example,
    Spoiler
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    Memetek, the priestess of Set, declares to her assembled acolytes that ‘I shall destroy the image of Osiris that now stands in his temple in Heliopolis, in the name of Set, the Burnt One!’ The acolytes cheer and in the world beyond, Set observes with interest, as his devotee sets out to strike a blow in his name. While the acolytes might help to storm the temple, the destruction of the image is Memetek’s sole responsibility.


    Typical Dedicated Acts: The most common dedicated acts in ordinary life (that is, when not on an adventure) are creative works. It is common for craftsmen to dedicate a given labor to a deity or for poets to dedicate epics to the honor of their Gods. Other dedicated acts include destroying an important enemy of your deity or of your city-state.

    The Reward For Dedicated Acts: Completion of a dedicated act should gain the character 1d6 temporary Divine Points, up to a maximum of his base Divine Points. Completion of a dedicated act in which the character faced repeated risks to his life should gain him 2d6 Divine Points. A dedicated act that takes several linked adventures to complete should increase the character’s base Divine Points by one or two.

    These rewards are quite separate from any experience points that the character might gain from carrying out his heroic deeds. Experience reflects what the character has personally learned from his encounters, while Divine Points are a measure of how pleased the character’s deity is with him. It is possible to complete a quest set for you by your deity without gaining any Divine Points at all, if you offend or displease your deity or do not complete the quest in the right way.

    For example,
    Spoiler
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    the quest of Heracles to defeat the Lernean Hydra was deemed to be null and void because he had the help of a henchman (who sealed the severed stumps of the Hydra’s heads with a blazing torch) and did not overcome the monster alone.


    Making An Item As A Dedicated Act: All deities will accept the manufacture of items that glorify them as dedicated acts, though some deities (such as Athena) are fonder of this than others. It may seem at first glance that there is no risk involved, but making an item is a risky business when done in honor of a deity, as failure by more than 5 ruins the piece and counts as failure. If you have invested in costly materials, such as marble or gold, then ruining these adds a financial loss to your dishonor in the deity’s eyes, so to say that this course of action is not a risky one is untrue.

    An item made as a dedicated act to a deity is subject to several conditions. Only certain types of item are acceptable. You cannot present a wooden spoon to Osiris and expect to be taken seriously, however well crafted it is. Items made as dedicated acts must either be ornamental, intended for ritual use or arms and armor. For example, you could not create a commonplace item such as a lamp as a dedicated act, as it is an ordinary household object; however, if it was destined to hang in the deity’s sanctuary and was suitably ornamented, you could create a lamp for ritual use as a dedicated act. If at any time you destroy all or part of the raw materials, you have failed in your task; the item is flawed and may not be worked on again. The item, once made, may not be sold. It must be presented to the temple of the appropriate deity or given in trust to a priest of the deity. To sell an item that you have made as a dedicated act gains you the deity’s disfavor immediately, as it is a wanton blasphemy.

    Finally, an item made for this purpose must be of exceptional quality. Whether it is useful or ornamental, the item must be made as a masterwork item. Some ‘items’ are so large that they are not made, but built; edifices like temples or enormous statues of the Gods come into this category. To build such things is the ultimate aim of the true devotee. Obviously, the character cannot build whole temples on his own. To count as the ‘builder’ of a temple or similar huge edifice, the character must give precise instructions for its construction and make all the necessary payments himself. Raising temples to the Gods is the standard way for an exceptionally powerful character such as a Lugal or an Ensi to gain renown in the eyes of his people and his celestial patrons. If a temple should ever be sacked, the character loses the same number of permanent Divine Points as he gained for building it.

    A temple or huge statue counts as ‘finished’ when the first sacrifice is made within it to consecrate it for use. Not until then does any adjustment to Divine Points occur. The following table gives typical rewards for making an item.

    Divine Points For Making Items As Dedicated Acts
    {table=head]Item Made|Divine Point Reward

    Item made from clay, cloth or wood, such as a lamp, pot, carving or hanging|1

    Item of Large size or larger made from clay, cloth or wood|1d3

    Item of Fine or Tiny size made from precious materials (gold, silver, jewels)|1d6

    Item of Small size made from precious materials|2d4

    Item of Medium size made from precious materials|2d6

    Image of the deity (Small sized, such as a portable icon)|1d2

    Statue of the deity (Medium sized, such as a standard temple image)|1d6

    Statue of the deity (Large sized, such as would be found in a major temple)|2d4

    Statue of the deity (Huge sized, such as the image of Amun cut into a cliff side)|Base divine points increased by +4

    Temple built (ordinary size)|Base divine points increased by +2

    Especially grand temple built|Base divine points increased by +6

    Colossal temple built|Base divine points increased by +10[/table]

    Failure To Perform A Dedicated Act: If you dedicate an act to your deity and then fail to perform it, you lose 1d6 temporary Divine Points. If the failure results in damage to the deity’s cult, image or good standing (such as a public insult to the deity going unavenged or a temple being sacked and burned) then you lose 1 base Divine Point and gain the deity’s disfavor.

    Group Dedicated Acts: A group of people who follow the same deity can jointly pledge themselves to accomplish a task in the deity’s name. Deities approve of individual acts of heroism more than any other but they will sometimes reward groups who dedicate acts to them. No deity will ever award more than three temporary Divine Points to anyone for taking part in a group effort. A single misdeed on the part of any participant in the dedicated act is enough to sabotage the whole operation and the deity will not reward anyone even if the act succeeds; the whole group is penalized for the failings of just one person. If you and others are going to undertake a dedicated act as a group, you need to be very sure that the other members are wholly trustworthy.

    Dedicated Acts In A Game: Dedicated actions are very useful to the players, as they allow the characters to regain divine points. They are also useful to the Games Master, as they provide immediate character motivation and encourage characters to commence subplots of their own. Players are always on the lookout for more Divine Points and if they have a good grasp of what their deity is like, they will be ready to seize opportunities to please them with dedicated actions. It does not take long to get the knack of this and it lends flavor to a gaming session as well as boosting the characters’ abilities.

    Players tend to choose their own challenges and to make situations dramatic and heroic whenever possible. For example, if a group of heroes has come to a raging river and need to get across in order to reach the village where they will spend the night, there is little honor in turning back and returning the way they came, even though this is the safest option. A warrior might strip off his armor and declare ‘By Enisin, I shall swim this flood!’ and dive in, knowing that such a daring feat of athletics would be bound to impress his God. A different character could declare ‘With Enekur as my witness, I shall contrive for us a way across’, and proceed to solve the problem with ingenuity instead of physical prowess.



    Divine Favor and Disfavor
    As well as the ongoing goodwill indicated by a character’s divine points, there are more general categories of favor and disfavor. There is a difference between the reward of divine points and the reward of favor. To a deity, you are a servant. If you serve well, you will be well paid; this is what divine points represent. However, serving well does not mean that the deity necessarily likes you. The deities of the ancient world are extremely human-like in their emotions and attitudes. If a deity decides that they like you personally, then this is what is meant by favor.

    The Games Master decides when a character becomes favored or beloved by a deity. Favor and love are not something that any character has when they start the game, unless they have a mythic background. As a general guideline, if the character exposes himself to serious risk numerous times in the interests of the deity or the deity’s followers or carries out a quest on behalf of the same, divine favor is a likely result.

    Spoiler
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    Favored Status
    If your acts especially please your deity or even a deity who is not your patron, you may become favored by him. For example, a ruler who was consistently just, wise and fair might well become favored by Athena, even if his patron deity was Zeus. If a deity has favored you, it means the deity has taken an interest in you, likes your approach to life and considers you to be an ally.

    Being favored by a deity has distinct advantages. You benefit more from the blessings of the deity than others do and you can call upon the deity’s help. Specifically, you may petition the deity for a miracle once per day with a Prayer check, as if you were a priest. If you are a priest, then you gain an additional free miracle per day.

    Beloved Status
    There is a second stage beyond being favored. Some rare individuals are beloved of a given deity. This privilege is reserved for those who have completed major quests in a deity’s name or for those who are the children of the deity in question.

    Being beloved by a deity is much like being favored, with the additional benefit that the deity will bestow its gift upon you for limited periods without question. In brief, you may make a request item attempt once per week without needing to make a check. For example, if you were beloved of Artemis, you could borrow her bow or crown once a week. This must always be for a purpose of which the deity would approve. Even if you are beloved of a deity, you cannot borrow a divine item for a trivial or foolish purpose.

    Disfavored Status
    To earn the disfavor of your own deity, all you have to do is commit sins until the deity notices. To earn the disfavor of a different deity, you must do something that actively offends against that deity’s cult within the world. Striking a woman does not earn you the disfavor of Eniki automatically, but striking a priestess of Eniki almost certainly does. You could therefore earn a deity’s disfavor by insulting or damaging the deity’s image, attacking a member of the deity’s priesthood, insulting the deity in speech and so forth.

    It is a matter of record that the easiest way to earn the disfavor of a deity is to boast that you are better at something than they are. Claiming to be better than a God would surely seem like the most stupid of boasts to make, but this did not stop Arachne from boasting that she was a better spinner than Athena (earning her wrath and resulting in her transformation into a spider, from whence we get the term arachnid) or Agamemnon from boasting that he was a better shot than Artemis, which caused that Goddess to demand the sacrifice of his daughter in atonement. These examples should help the Games Master reckon up the degree of offence that the deities take from mortal boasts.

    Killing a follower of a deity does not gain you the deity’s disfavor unless the person you killed was favored (or worse, beloved) of the deity. So, if you killed an ordinary worshipper of Apophis, the serpent God would take no notice but if you killed a worshipper who Apophis favored, you would risk his disfavor.

    One other way to earn a deity’s disfavor is to fail to propitiate the deity when you should; see below under Sacrifice, Propitiation and Atonement. No matter which deity you follow, there are always times when you should pay another deity their due.

    Earning Disfavor: When a character takes any action that could conceivably earn the deity’s disfavor, then the Games Master rolls d20 in secret and adds the character’s level of experience. (If the character is already disfavored, a +5 modifier is added to this check.) If the result is 10 or greater, the deity notices the affront; the character gains the disfavor of the deity if he did not already have it. If the result is 20 or greater, he becomes despised and at the Games Master’s discretion may suffer the wrath of the deity as well. If the affront involved killing a person who was beloved of the deity or desecrating a temple of the deity, then the character becomes despised immediately.

    When a given deity disfavors you, phenomena and creatures in that deity’s sphere of influence become more damaging to you than they otherwise would. For example, if you had offended Poseidon, then the raging seas would seem more eager to drown you than usual when you fell into them. In game terms, this translates to a –2 penalty against certain attacks and effects that are under the dominion of that deity.
    The ‘disfavor’ entry in the description of the deity’s religion below gives the check or saving throw to which the penalty is applied in each case.

    If you are careful, then you can avoid the circumstances in which the deity’s disfavor would apply to you. For example, those who earn the disfavor of Ra suffer a penalty to all attack rolls during the hour of dawn, which is the time of Ra’s strength. If you know this, then you can avoid fighting during the dawn hour. Note that this is just what happens when an individual earns the disfavor of a deity. It is possible for deities to hold entire cities in disfavor. If this happens, then the Games Master should apply a suitable collective misfortune. For example, a city that had insulted Bastet could have all its cats leave overnight, resulting in a plague of rats that devoured the grain stores.

    The most striking examples of divine disfavor on a large scale are those when a deity holds the whole world in disfavor, as when Enlil chose to flood the world and drown everyone (leaving only Atra-hasis to escape) or when Eninanna refused to renew the earth, plunging the world into eternal winter.

    Despised Status
    Those who perform deeds that repeatedly offend a deity or that grossly violate a deity’s code (such as desecrating of the deity’s temple or slaughtering a person who the deity loves) may find themselves despised by that deity. Being despised gains you the penalties of being disfavored. In addition, priestly miracles of a harmful or destructive kind cast by followers of the deity have a more harmful effect upon such characters and their saving throws to avoid the effects are penalized by -2.

    For example, the Pharaoh is the son of Ra; as such, he is hated by Apophis and suffers a –2 penalty to saving throws against spells and miracles thrown at him by the priests and priestesses of Apophis.

    Unknown Status
    Players may sometimes be uncertain as to whether a given act has angered their deity or not. The Games Master is the judge of this and also decides whether a given deity extends their favor or love to a given character. The Games Master has the final say on these matters.

    As a player, you do not necessarily know how your deity feels about you. The first you know of your deity’s anger over something that you have done may be a run of apparent bad luck or an unpleasant omen. For example, if you failed to pay tribute to Bastet and then suffered a mauling at the hands of a mountain lion, you might conclude that Bastet had disfavored you. Then again, it might just be coincidence. The people of the ancient world were prone to see omens of divine disfavor in everything that happened to them.
    A character with the Interpret Divine Will feat can attempt to discover the attitude of a given God to a given character. Once you have discovered your standing with the deity, you can take appropriate action, such as offering up a propitiatory sacrifice to regain the deity’s favor or repairing the wrong you have done.
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-11 at 12:46 PM. Reason: added spoilers tags to condense text

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting][PEACH] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Equipment, Arms and Armor
    Kudur is a bronze-age world, and thus has most equipment at a premium. During this time in the history of the world, most metal was extremely expensive, and anything other than bronze, copper, tin, gold, and silver was considered magical by the inhabitants. Metal working is an exclusively human domain -- it is still so new an art that gods have not been chosen for it.

    Nobles often embellished their weapons with gems and other decorations, and masterwork or mighty weapons could be given names and acquire histories despite being non-magical. Bronze Age weapons tended to be lighter than in later eras, because there was less need to penetrate heavy armor.

    Against bronze armor and shields, iron weapons have their threat range increased by +2. Meanwhile, against iron armor and shields, bronze weapons have their threat range decreased by -2 (although a natural 20 is still always a threat), and their critical multiplier decreased by x1 (to a minimum of x2)

    Copper weapons are considered a standard metal at this time. Anyone can mine copper, melt it, and forge it into a weapon. However, Bronze requires specialized smithing and smelting of tin with the copper, which grants it a +1 bonus against copper weapons and armor. Stone (or bone) weapons and armor take a -1 penalty against any metal, as well as weighing twice as much as their metal equivalent. Due to the length of time it takes to chisel out a stone weapon, their cost remains the same.

    In a Bronze Age campaign, armor selection is quite limited. No heavy armor exists. In any case, the hot climate of Mesopotamia tends to favor light clothing and armor.

    Barter
    In a barter economy, the price of everything is negotiable. Without fixed prices, a person’s skill as a trader is almost as important as the goods themselves when it comes to cementing a deal. While trivial purchases can
    be handled by a simple exchange of valuables at list prices, large, urgent, or uncommon purchases pit the Appraise skill of the buyer against the Bluff skill of the seller. Checks of both skills are made by the GM in secret, with the result of the Bluff check used as a modifier on the Appraise roll.

    The scarcity of the items being haggled over determines the Difficulty Class of the seller’s Bluff check.If the seller’s Bluff check is successful, the amount by which his roll exceeds the target is applied as a penalty to the Appraise roll of the buyer. If the buyer’s Appraise check is successful (abundant DC 12, plentiful DC 14, reasonably common DC 16, hard to find DC 18, almost impossible to find DC 20), he appraises the item within 91% to 110% (90% +1d20) of its actual value, and is able to close a deal at that price—the actual haggling to arrive at that final price can be skipped in the interest of speeding play.

    If the buyer’s Appraise check is failed, he estimates the item’s value at 50% to 140% (40% + 1d10 x 10) its actual worth. The seller, of course, accepts any sale at more than the actual value, and refuses any offer of less than par. But that doesn’t mean that the buyer can’t waste his time trying to force a deal, though. If the buyer is paying with goods instead of gold or silver, the process then has to be reversed to determine the value of whatever the buyer is offering in trade. Once both parties are satisfied as to the value of
    the items under consideration, then deciding whether to make an exchange is
    straightforward. Buyers and sellers may get bonuses or penalties to their checks depending on outside factors.

    Barter Bluff Checks
    {table=head]Scarcity|Target DC

    Item is abundant; everyone has one|30

    Item is plentiful; all but the poorest have one|25

    Item is reasonably common; available from multiple sources in most markets|20

    Item is hard to find; even in cities, few dealers have one|15

    Item is almost impossible to find; not everyone has ever seen one, and not every city even has one for sale (also including seasonal goods out of season)|10[/table]

    Knowledge (Trade) Checks
    {table=head]Scarcity|Target DC

    Item is abundant|10

    Item is plentiful|12

    Item is reasonably common|14

    Item is hard to find|16

    Item is almost impossible to find|18 [/table]


    Weapons

    Simple Weapons—Melee
    {table=head]Size|Weapon|Cost|Damage|Critical|Range Increment|Weight|Type

    Unarmed Attacks

    |Strike, unarmed (Medium-size)||1d3**|x2|||Bludgeoning

    |Strike, unarmed (Small)||1d2**|x2|||Bludgeoning

    Tiny

    |Dagger*|4 gp|1d4|19-20/x2|10 ft.|1 lb.|Piercing

    Small

    |Mace, light|25 gp|1d6|x2||6 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Sickle|12 gp|1d6|x2||3 lb.|Slashing

    Medium-size

    |Club||1d6|x2|10 ft.|3 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Halfspear|5 gp|1d6|x3|20 ft.|3 lb.|Piercing

    |Mace, heavy|60 gp|1d8|x2||12 lb.|Bludgeoning

    Large
    |Great Staff, Metal-Shod|40 gp|1d10|x2||20 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Quarterstaff*#||1d6/1d6|x2||4 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Shortspear|10 gp|1d8|x3|20 ft.|5 lb.|Piercing[/table]
    *See the description of this weapon in the PH for special rules
    **This weapon deals subdual damage, rather than normal damage
    #Double weapon


    Martial Weapons—Melee
    {table=head]Size|Weapon|Cost|Damage|Critical|Range Increment|Weight|Type
    Small

    |Axe, throwing|4 gp|1d6|x2|10 ft.|4 lb.|Slashing

    |Hammer, light|5 gp|1d4|x2|20 ft.|2 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Handaxe|12 gp|1d6|x3||5 lb.|Slashing

    |Pick, light*|20 gp|1d4|x4||4 lb.|Piercing

    |Sap|1 gp|1d6**|x2||3 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Sword, short|100 gp|1d6|19-20/x2||3 lb.|Piercing

    Medium-size

    |Battleaxe|100 gp|1d8|x3||7 lb.|Slashing

    |Flail, light*|40 gp|1d8|x2||5 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Khopesh (sicklesword)|125 gp|1d6|19-20/x2||4 lb.|Slashing

    |Longsword|150 gp|1d8|19-20/x2||4 lb.|Slashing

    |Pick, heavy*|40 gp|1d6|x4||6 lb.|Piercing

    |Scimitar|150 gp|1d6|18-20/x2||4 lb.|Slashing

    |Warhammer|120 gp|1d8|x3||8 lb.|Bludgeoning

    Large

    |Greatclub||1d10|x2||10 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Longspear*|25 gp|1d8|x3||9 lb.|Piercing

    |Scythe|36 gp|2d4|x4||12 lb.|Piercing and Slashing[/table]
    *See the description of this weapon in the PH for special rules
    **This weapon deals subdual damage, rather than normal damage
    #Double weapon


    Simple Weapons—Ranged
    {table=head]Size|Weapon|Cost|Damage|Critical|Range Increment|Weight|Type

    Small

    |Dart|2 gp|1d4|x2|20 ft.|½ lb.|Piercing

    |Sling||1d4|x2|50 ft.|0 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Stones, sling (10)|1 sp||||5 lb.

    Medium-size

    |Javelin|5 gp|1d6|x2|30 ft.|2 lb.|Piercing[/table]
    *See the description of this weapon in the PH for special rules
    **This weapon deals subdual damage, rather than normal damage
    #Double weapon


    Martial Weapons—Ranged
    {table=head]Size|Weapon|Cost|Damage|Critical|Range Increment|Weight|Type

    Medium-size

    |Shortbow*|60 gp|1d6|x3|60 ft.|2 lb.|Piercing

    |Arrows (20)|3 gp||||3 lb.

    |Shortbow, composite*|225 gp|1d6|x3|70 ft.|2 lb.|Piercing

    |Arrows (20)|3 gp||||3 lb.

    |Clay Ball Thrower|3 gp|1d6|x2|30 ft.|1 lb.|Bludgeoning

    |Clay Ball Shot (5)|3 gp||||2 lb.

    Large

    |Longbow*|150 gp|1d8|x3|100 ft.|3 lb.|Piercing

    |Arrows (20)|3 gp||||3 lb.

    |Longbow, composite*|300 gp|1d8|x3|110 ft.|3 lb.|Piercing

    |Arrows (20)|3 gp||||3 lb.[/table]
    *See the description of this weapon in the PH for special rules
    **This weapon deals subdual damage, rather than normal damage
    #Double weapon


    Exotic Weapons—Ranged
    {table=head]Size|Weapon|Cost|Damage|Critical|Range Increment|Weight|Type

    Small

    |Whip*|2 gp|1d2**|x2|15 ft.*|2 lb.|Slashing

    Medium-size

    |Net*|20 gp|||10 ft.|10 lb|*[/table]
    *See the description of this weapon in the PH for special rules
    **This weapon deals subdual damage, rather than normal damage
    #Double weapon



    Armor

    {table=head]Type|Armor|Cost|Armor Bonus|Max Dex Bonus|Armor Check Penalty|Arcane Spell Failure|Speed|Weight

    Light armor

    |Padded|5 gp|
    +1
    |
    +8
    |
    0
    |
    5%
    |30 ft./20 ft.|10 lb.

    |Heavy cloth|50 gp|
    +2
    |
    +6
    |
    0
    |
    10%
    |30 ft./20 ft.|15 lb.

    |Leather cloak|10 gp|
    +1
    |
    +9
    |
    0
    |
    0%
    |30 ft./20 ft.|5 lb.

    |Studded leather cloak|75 gp|
    +2
    |
    +7
    |
    0
    |
    0%
    |30 ft./20 ft.|10 lb.

    Medium armor

    |Hide|100 gp|
    +3
    |
    +4
    |
    -3
    |
    20%
    |20 ft./15 ft.|25 lb.

    |Scale mail|500 gp|
    +4
    |
    +3
    |
    -4
    |
    25%
    |20 ft./15 ft.|30 lb.

    |Breastplate|2,000 gp|
    +5
    |
    +3
    |
    -4
    |
    25%
    |20 ft./15 ft.|30 lb.

    Shields

    |Shield, small leather|3 gp|
    +1
    ||
    -1
    |
    5%
    |||4 lb.

    |Shield, small wooden|9 gp|
    +1
    ||
    -1
    |
    5%
    |||5 lb.

    |Shield, large leather|7 gp|
    +2
    ||
    -2
    |
    15%
    |||8 lb.

    |Shield, large wooden|20 gp|
    +2
    ||
    -2
    |
    15%
    |||10 lb.

    |Shield, tower|300 gp **||
    -10
    |
    50%
    |||45 lb.

    Extras
    |Helm|50 gp|
    +2
    ||
    -2*
    |
    5%
    |||10 lb.[/table]
    *This -2 penalty applies to Spot, Listen, and Search checks while wearing a helm.
    ** See description below.


    Special And Superior Items
    {table=head]Weapon or Armor|Cost

    Weapon, masterwork|+600 gp

    Arrow, or bullet, masterwork|21 gp

    Arrow, or bullet, silvered|3 gp

    Dagger, silvered|20 gp

    Mighty composite shortbow

    (+1 Str bonus)|450 gp

    Mighty composite longbow

    (+1 Str bonus)|600 gp

    (+2 Str bonus)|900 gp

    (+3 Str bonus)|1,200 gp

    (+4 Str bonus)|1,500 gp

    Armor or shield, masterwork|+300[/table]


    Weapon and Armor Descriptions

    Weapons

    Clay Ball Thrower: Essentially a large sling, this weapon allows the wielder to hurl heavy clay balls at a foe.
    Khopesh: This sickle-shaped sword can be used normally by those with Martial Weapon Proficiency. Those with Exotic Weapon Proficiency (khopesh) can make trip attacks with it, and gain a +2 bonus to attempts to disarm opponents (including the roll to avoid being disarmed it the disarm attempt fails). Weapon Finesse can be applied to the khopesh.
    Metal-Shod Great Staff: This 10-ft, long staff is a hollow bronze pipe, with a metal ball fixed at the end.

    Armor

    Heavy Cloth: This armor consists of either thin cloth (e.g., linen) that is boiled in oil or wax to stiffen it, or thick cloth (e.g., felt) that can turn away some blows or missiles. It is hot, scratchy, and uncomfortable.
    Leather Cloak: This full-length thick leather cape trades off a minimal protective value with the benefit of minimal encumbrance of the wearer.
    Shields: Leather shields are made of hides stretched over wooden frames. Wicker shields are included in this class. Wooden shields can include metal bosses or other reinforcements.
    Studded Leather Cloak: This leather cape includes large metal rivets (larger than in close-fitting suits of studded leather armor worn in later eras) to help turn the blows of weapons.
    Tower Shield: This massive wooden shield is nearly as tall as the wielder. Basically, it is a portable wall meant to provide cover. It can provide up to total cover, depending on how far a character comes out from behind it. A tower shield, however, does not provide cover against targeted spells; a spellcaster can cast a spell on a character by targeting the shield. A tower shield cannot be used for the shield bash action. This shield is rarely used by a solitary warrior: usually it is carried by a lightlyarmed shieldbearer whose primary job is to protect the warrior, freeing him to use both hands for bow use, to control the reins of a chariot, or to cast spells.
    Helm: In later eras, this full head covering was simply considered a part of a suit of armor, but in the Bronze Age, it is sometimes worn with light armor or even on its own. Breastplate is the only armor type that comes with a helm automatically

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Codes of the Deities
    This section explains the codes by which a follower of a given deity is expected to live. Rather than give a full and detailed account of the religion, each deity has three keywords, indicating the concepts that the followers revere. From these, any player will be able to work out his character’s attitude in a given situation. There follows a summary of the particular moral stance taken by the deity’s followers, concluding with a description of Virtues and Sins, indicating which actions are praised by the deity and which are punished. The GM, taking the part of a God, can refer to this to find out when a character’s actions should incur the favour or disfavour of a deity.

    Virtues: The section describing Virtues is given primarily as a role-playing aid, so that players know what their characters’ values are likely to be. When a character commits a virtuous act as defined by his deity, there is not necessarily any reward for it; it is, after all, what is expected of him. To get a reward of any kind from the deity, you must perform dedicated acts (see below) and not just virtuous ones. However, when a character goes out of his way to do a virtuous thing at risk to himself, he should receive a single Divine Point (up to his maximum) in recognition of this.

    For example, a worshipper of Enimmursag who stands his ground against three opponents so that his comrades can escape is clearly being courageous at great personal risk, so he should receive a Divine Point. By contrast, a worshipper of Eniki who gives a handful of copper coins to beggars when she has a purse full of gold is being generous at no personal risk, so she should not receive anything.

    Sins: Sins are another matter. A character that commits a sin (by the standards of his deity) risks earning his deity’s disfavour. The gods are, however, not omniscient and do not always notice when sins are committed. Whenever any character acts contrary to his deity’s code and commits a sin, the GM secretly rolls 1d20 plus the character’s experience level. If the result is 10 or greater, the deity notices the sin as it is committed; the character gains the disfavour of his deity and may not spend Divine Points until the sin is atoned for (see Atonement). If the result is 20 or greater, the deity is angered by the sin; the character gains the deity’s disfavour and loses one base Divine Point. If he is of 10th level or higher, he is also punished with the deity’s wrath. Otherwise, the sin passes unnoticed and the character is none the worse for it.

    Deities in the ancient world have lives of their own, resulting in mortals on earth sometimes being able to get away with crimes that would otherwise be punished. The self-evident failure of the gods to avenge every infraction is explained by this habit of theirs. The more renown a character has, the more likely it is that the Gods will watch and take note of his conduct, which is why it is harder for a high-level character to misbehave with impunity than a low-level one. A king or hero is thus more likely to be punished for his sins than a mere peasant, because kings and heroes are supposed to be examples for others. Nonetheless, even heroes sometimes commit sins and get away with it. The eyes and ears of the Gods are sharp indeed, but they do not notice every single thing that happens upon Earth.

    Remember that while the deity’s code is only binding upon those who follow the deity, followers of the deity will want to put their standards into practice whenever they can. For example, followers of Enimmursag despise all cowardice, not just that which arises amongst their own numbers. In the ancient world, there is none of the tolerance between religions that we find today. The supporters of a deity are as fervent as the supporters of a modern sports team. If it were not for the Kudurri deities being on the same side, so to speak, then there would doubtless be endless feuds between the cults of the different deities, as each struggles to put its own ideology into practice at the expense of the others. Indeed, this is the primary source of conflict between the city-states of Kudur, as the more aggressive gods and goddesses attempt to take land (or even an entire city) from his or her neighbors.

    Each entry gives a list of the kind of people who is most likely to take the deity as a personal patron. This list is not at all exclusive; you do not have to be on it in order to worship the deity.

    Common Factors: Every one of the twelve Olympian deities considers breach of a solemn oath to be a sin, so this is not detailed in their description. Of them all, only Enzuabu is likely to be at all flexible, helping his followers to twist the meaning of their words so that they can truthfully claim not to have broken the letter of an oath, even if they have clearly broken it in spirit.


    The Kudurri Pantheon
    This section is not exhaustive. Only the major Kudurri deities are listed as these are the likeliest to be worshipped by the players. There are many additional deities but these are not significant enough to have a cult of their own, though they may be propitiated where appropriate. Gods would always be referred to by placing En- in front of the name, while goddesses are referred to by placing Eni- in front of the name. These syllables simply mean “the god” and “the goddess” in the agglutinative language of Kudur.

    Fluff for the gods and goddesses comes from Sumerian mythology, specifically that put together by James W Bell. If you’re interested in the fluff, you should check out his stories.


    Anu
    An (in Sumerian AN=Heaven) was regarded by Sumerian mythology as the father of all the gods who came down to live on the Earth. His wife was Antu. Not much is known about Anu and no identifiable images of him are known to exist.

    In the stories of James Bell, Anu came down to the Earth after the Flood when the gods on Earth had abandoned the mountainlands, the Land of the Gods, where they had originally settled. The mountainlands soon became home to roving bandit gangs and horned warriors who periodically attacked settlements on the plain of Sumer.

    To protect the black-headed people, as the Sumerians called themselves, who were living on the plain, Anu built a citadel in a mountain pass that he named Der. While at Der, the supreme god met young Innin, the self-appointed queen of the nearby city of Aratta. Innin was young and Anu fell under the spell of her charms. It was he who renamed her and first called her Inanna, Queen of Heaven.

    With Anu's help, Inanna accumulated wealth and power. She built a great temple named the E.anna in the ancient and holy Eanna quarter of Uruk and invited Anu to come live with her. Anu accepted and moved into the E.anna Temple, turning the citadel of Der over to Ishtaran and abandoning his wife, Antu, who remained in Heaven.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Keywords: The keywords of the cult of Anu are authority, justice and vengeance.
    Cult: Devotees of the All-Father respect law and order and those who embody it. They must give due honour to monarchs, emperors, princes, potentates and other members of the governing elite. They are obliged to defend the practice of religion in general, at least where it pertains to the Kudurri pantheon. As Anu is the king of the Gods, so is his cult the head of all cults; his worshippers are thus bound to protect the temples of other allied deities. No follower of Anu may refuse to aid a sincere priest or priestess of another of the Kudurri Gods or turn a blind eye to blasphemy against any one of them.
    Injustice is abhorrent to followers of Anu. They are expected to be firm and fair, erring on the side of severity rather than mercy. Anu is more likely to punish disobedience than to reward obedience and his followers take after him. As Anu means Heaven, or The Great Above, the winds and clouds are considered to be omens of his will. All uses of the Interpret Divine Will feat made by followers of Anu during windy or stormy conditions are made at a +2 circumstance bonus.
    Virtues: Obedience to due authority, acceptance of fate, reverence to the Gods, firm rulership, fathering children, avenging wrongs. Anu is biased in favor of men and is more likely to give his blessing to a good father with a firm hand than to a wise mother.
    Sins: Self-aggrandizement, rebelliousness, contempt of the Gods. Anu especially hates hubris, which is the sin of pride. He approves of prosperity, but likes mortals to remember their place. The moment a mortal thinks that he has become so powerful or wealthy that he can safely ignore the Gods, Anu is liable to cast him down.
    Disfavor: Saving throws to avoid damage from environmental hazards, such as falling rocks, heat or cold.
    Dedicated Acts: Conversion of unbelievers to the faith; destroying enemies of the gods; punishment of the rebellious; acts of vengeance.
    Favored Checks: Ranged attack rolls with thrown weapons, Presence skill checks, Sense Motive skill checks, Search skill checks, Strength ability score checks, Knowledge skill checks, Will saving throws.


    Aggasher
    Aggasher (also known as Ereshkigal, 'Queen of the Great Below), Inanna's older sister, was Queen of the Netherworld.

    In the stories of James Bell, after Gilgamesh and Enkidu killed her first husband, the Bull of Heaven or Gulgananna, Aggasher (there called Ereshkigal) married Nergal. They lived in her palace, the E.galgina, in the city of Irkalla, capital of the Netherworld. There, they had twin thrones of lapis luzuli in the Great Throne Room. Ereshkigal ritually dressed herself in a fashionable robe of red, tufted wool which was liberally fringed in black.

    Aggasher was insanely jealous of her younger sister, Inanna, who was born in the mountainlands of the Earth, first called the Land of the Gods and then later called the Hursag, or mountainlands. Inanna had, by her own wit, become the Queen of Heaven. In an attempt to match her sister's accomplishments, Aggasher cut through the floor of the Netherworld to let in the fiery light of the Underworld, allowing the hot fires from the underside of the Earth into what had been the quiet darkness of the Netherworld. This pained Nergal, who always yearned for the darkness and quiet that was the Netherworld as it was when he first arrived.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Keywords: The keywords of the cult of Aggasher are darkness, underground and healing.
    Cult: Aggasher’s followers have their place in society, though they are feared and mistrusted. The cult of Aggasher is dedicated primarily to the defense of female interests, the punishment of the guilty and the redressing of wrongs against the cult members themselves. Oddly, through their use of herbs as poisons, the followers of Aggasher have also become accomplished healers. They take it as part of their duty to decide who should be helped and who should be hindered, however. The followers of Aggasher believe secrets to be sacred, and thus protect their healing knowledge vigorously. Darkness, shunned and lonely places, the tombs of the dead and desolate heaths are all places that Aggasher adores and it is for this reason that her devotees meet there.
    The cultists of Aggasher look after each other in everyday life. Irrespective of the social class of the devotee, she (or he) will be protected if there is any difficulty. Even slaves who have pledged themselves to the cult have found themselves freed from brutal masters after one undeserved beating too many. This covert punishment of crimes is frowned upon by the likes of the Anu and Bilulu cults, who prefer due procedure and formal trial to the cloak-and-dagger business so beloved of Aggasher own but even they understand that the dark sisters are best left to their work.
    Virtues: Endurance, ruthlessness, secrecy, cleverness, adroit manipulation of others, respect for the dead, payment of what is due, self-sufficiency.
    Sins: Betrayal, carelessness, sentimentality, falling under the influence of a male.
    Disfavor: All saving throws and attack rolls made while the character is in moonlight.
    Dedicated Acts: Sacrifice of opponents of the Aggasher cult, consignment of treasures to the earth in tribute, acts of vengeance, acquisition of personal power.
    Favored Checks: Healing skill checks, Hide skill checks, Move Silently skill checks, Presence skill checks, Medicine skill checks.


    Bilulu
    Bilulu, the Sumerian god of rivers, was appointed 'canal inspector' by Enki after he had filled the Tigris and the Euphrates with water. He charged Enbilulu with maintaining the waters of abundance (hegal) and see to it that they were correctly apportioned between the two rivers.

    In the stories of James Bell, it was Bilulu who helped Enki evenly distribute abundance throughout the Land.

    The following of the God of rivers is made up of those who live beside any body of water, merchants, sailors, farmers (who depend on the life-giving waters for the fertility of the soil) and some warriors.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Keywords: The keywords of the cult of Bilulu are increase, dominion and water.
    Cult: Bilulu’s followers embody endurance, persistence and weathering the storms of life. They are rarely drawn into petty conflicts with followers of other Gods and take a ‘strong older brother’ stance. It is unusual for them to care about issues that they deem beneath them; if they concern themselves with conflicts upon earth at all, it is always because they stand to gain by it somehow. They are forever consolidating the gains they have already won and seeking more. They progress not by outright assault (simply conquering without argument or explanation) but by making a claim to a region and hotly debating it with the current owners, finally ending by taking it by force if necessary.
    To a devotee of Bilulu, your strength and your holdings are everything. They are steady expansionists, never satisfied with what they have and always seeking to enlarge their borders. They see themselves as the strongest rivals to the dominion of Anu and though they accept his authority at the moment, this has not always been the case.
    Virtues: Endurance, righteous anger, strength, persistence, parsimony, hoarding, increasing your holdings.
    Sins: Waste, theft, attacking an unarmed opponent, squandering wealth, defiling waters (such as by poisoning them), giving in too easily, allowing another to take your goods, humility, lack of ambition.
    Disfavor: Swim skill checks.
    Dedicated Acts: Capturing and taming wild beasts (especially horses), swimming long distances, capturing territory, raiding by boat, gaining material assets such as property and great riches, enduring the elements.
    Favored Checks: Ride skill checks, Use Rope skill checks, Swim skill checks, Fortitude saving throws, melee or ranged attack rolls when using a trident or net.


    Ki
    Ki (“Earth”, also known as Inanna, “Queen of Heaven”, because of her marriage to Anu) was the most popular of all goddesses in ancient Sumer. In the stories of James Bell, Inanna is the youngest of the gods, having been born on the Earth in the Land of the Gods (the original name for the mountainlands - the Zagros Mountains - later called the Hursag) as Innin. Unlike other gods and goddesses, she was assigned no task to perform of the Earth and therefore held no position in the divine pantheon or in the Assembly of the Gods.

    When the gods abandoned the mountainlands and moved down to the plain of Sumer, Innin assumed tutelage of the mountain city of Aratta and declared herself its queen. While serving as its patron deity, she came into contact with Anu who had built the citadel of Der in the foothills to protect the cities of Sumer from attack by mountain men who had grown lawless after the major gods left. Inanna and Anu become infatuated with each other and it is at this point that Anu awarded the young goddess the name, Inanna, Queen of Heaven.

    Ki has her greatest following among farmers, mothers and dwellers in the country. She is more likely to be worshipped by the poor than the rich. She represents the cultivated soil, rather than the primordial raw earth.
    Keywords: The keywords of the cult of Ki are earth, fertility, motherhood and mystery.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Cult: Ki is set over those who practice husbandry and whose lives depend on the fertility of the earth. As she also governs the earth underfoot in its role as the gateway between the world of men and the underworld, she is also the Goddess associated with the afterlife and the mysteries of initiation.
    Virtues: Generosity, industry, productivity, freeing captives, producing children, caring for the needy in the area. Followers of Ki are expected to nurture those around them just as the earth herself nurtures those who dwell upon it.
    Sins: Ki abhors defilement of the earth (such as the destruction of fertile land), wasting resources, separating children from their parents, refusing food to the needy, cruel treatment of women or children and wanton destruction.
    Disfavor: Survival skill checks when in pastoral regions.
    Dedicated Acts: Capturing or clearing farmland; freeing the enslaved; undergoing torment or trial and emerging triumphant; defending the cultivated earth.
    Favored Checks: Handle Animal skill checks, Disguise skill checks, Fortitude saving throws, Knowledge (nature) skill checks, Craft (Herbalism) skill checks, Survival skill checks, Ride skill checks, Search skill checks.


    Immursag
    This vain god believes himself to be superior to all the other gods of Kudurr. Unfortunately, his wars with his neighbors Zuabu and Gibil have resulted in an Immursagi defeat every five out of seven times. He especially hates the Giblut, as they continue to win battle after battle, without Engibil ever bothering to show up on the battlefield.

    According to legend, Immursag defeated and enslaved the mushhushshu snake dragon. Later, when Eshnunna was conquered by Babylonia, Marduk, the chief god of Babylonia, took charge of the snake dragon and adopted it as his symbol. Mushhushshu snake dragons were one of the three animal species that later decorated the Ishtar Gate of Babylon, the other two species being lions and aurochs.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Keywords: The keywords of the cult of Immursag are strength, dominance and combat.
    Cult: Nobody enters the cult of Immursag without knowing how to fight. Physical fitness, aggression and competence with weapons are valued above all else. Immursag has a bad reputation among the Kudurri gods for being quarrelsome and truculent, and this reputation passes to his followers. They take what they want and have no compunctions about pushing others around. If it were not for the priesthoods of the other Kudurri deities keeping the cult of Immursag in check, it would probably exceed its bounds and grow to dominate the others.
    This troublesome cult does have a strong positive side. As Immursag is the God of War, his followers make the best fighters and at times of war, they come to the fore. They see war between nations as an opportunity to gain the favor of their grim God, who respects few dedicated acts other than those that take place on the battlefield. Ares cultists are jealous for glory in war, competing with each other to claim prizes and slaughter foes. The battlefields of the ancient world ring with the roars of Immursagi cultists dedicating enemy after enemy to their God, striking down one after another as the red rage howls in their veins and they feel the presence of Immursag within them urging them on. It is standard practice for an Immursag cultist engaged in mass combat to use up his Divine Points hacking his foes to pieces, then go after a major target (such as an enemy champion) as a dedicated act.
    Virtues: Heroism, courage, obeying orders faithfully even if it leads to your death, taking pleasure in the good things of life, respect for the strength of others, taking what you want, refusal to tolerate insult.
    Sins: Cowardice, attacking an unarmed opponent, dereliction of duty, talking too much, evasiveness, showing weakness, compromise.
    Disfavor: Will saving throws to avoid fear effects.
    Dedicated Acts: Besting a single powerful opponent in combat, destroying a set number of foes (such as swearing to take ten enemy chariots), capturing an enemy position, capturing a city, avenging a fallen friend, taking prizes for your home nation, acts of conquest generally.
    Favored Checks: Melee or ranged attack rolls with any weapon except a bow, presence skill checks, Fortitude saving throws.


    Nug
    As Nug is the great Architect and Master Craftsman of the Gods, those who live by a craft and by building structures revere her. Nug is said to have given humans the knowledge of building so that they could build structures to shelter themselves and live longer. She is a planner as well as a laborer, depicted as being strong and short, even for a woman.
    Spoiler
    Show
    Keywords: The keywords of the cult of Nug are artifice, building and craft.
    Cult: The members of the cult of Nug are also the master builders of Kudur. They are called upon both to design and to assist in the consecration of any major building, whether for civic or religious use. The high priest of Nug, based in Memphis, is always an artificer of high level and directs the stonemasons personally during the building of important structures. The followers of Nug learn secrets of construction and mathematics that enable them to dominate the construction industry. Without their help and participation, the marvels of architecture that characterize ancient Kudur can never be built.
    Fortunately for the other cults, they are always willing to give assistance and see it as a sacred calling to do so. Nug is one of the oldest of the Gods and is seen by some to be the ultimate mother of the whole pantheon, the original being who created all.
    Virtues: Ingenuity, dedication, service, invention, craft, ambition, secretiveness.
    Sins: Laziness, carelessness, causing damage to a sacred item or structure, allowing construction secrets to be discovered, using substandard materials, failing to destroy a flawed item or construction.
    Disfavor: All skill checks when made inside any worked stone building larger than a house.
    Dedicated Checks: Crafting precious armor, crafting masterwork items (which may not then be sold, but only given away), creating marvelous items in service to a noble house or to the military, creating designs for temples and other marvelous structures of Large size or larger.
    Favored Checks: Appraise, Forgery, Craft, Knowledge (Architecture and Engineering), Sense Motive skill checks.


    More to follow
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-20 at 08:56 PM.

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Cosmology

    The Planes
    The Kudurri world ("Shamash") is flat, and exists as one of four planes of existence. The Great Above is akin to the material plane in other systems, and consists of everything between the earth and the sky, including cities, birds, humans, clouds, and so on.

    Above the Great Above is Heaven, "An" in Kudurian. This is the home of all the gods of Shamash, not just the Kudurri pantheon. There is one city in Heaven, known to the Kudurri as Anduruna, the Heavenly City Above. The major gods (as described in the Deities section) and the 600-odd Annunaki (lesser gods - each of one specific thing, such as wine fermentation, waterfalls, etc) came to dwell in The Great Above rather than in Heaven after a conflict with the Primeval Gods and the 300 Igigi ("remainder", lesser gods who sided with the Primeval Gods). The conflict was not absolute, but lead to the major gods wanting to separate themselves from the primeval gods.

    According to legend, the major gods created humans to farm the land and grow food, as the gods did not want to do these tedious tasks themselves. Offerings of food are thus made to the major gods in both thanksgiving for creation, and in supplication. To make the travels of the gods from Heaven to the Great Above easier, humans have built Ziggurats, 70-foot tall step pyramids. The major Ziggurats of Kudur are located in Zuabu, Immursag, and Aggasher.

    In addition to Heaven and the Great Above, the Kudurri recognize two other planes: The Great Below and the Underworld. The Great Below is divided into three sections: The Seas, the Abzu, and the Netherworld. The Seas contain all that swims in the ocean and are the remains of the great primeval mother goddess Enitiamat, slain by Enlil, and resting above the Abzu. The Abzu are the freshwaters which spring from the earth and flow through the rivers, and are the remains of the primeval father god, Enabzu, slain by Enki. These pure waters are the root of everything good in Kudurr, and a human can ritually purify him or herself by washing in pure water.

    The last part of the Great Below is the Netherworld ("Kur"). The Netherworld is the Land of No Return, and is located below the Abzu. It is dark and dusty, and the dead gather there once they are no longer remembered on Shamash. The dead are naked, with no water to drink or food to eat. However, the dead can have a more pleasant afterlife if mortals above remember them with offerings of food and water.

    Below the Great Below is the Underworld. The Underworld is heated every night by the sun, which passes very close beneath it, as though a piece of paper were held over a candle flame. Occasionally, pieces of the underworld make their way through the Great Below and to the surface of the Great Above - these are hot springs, bubbling holes of pitch and bitumen, and volcanic eruptions.

    The Dead
    When mortals on Shamash die, they do not immediately head for the Netherworld. Instead, they continue to exist as incorporeal beings on the Great Above for as long as there is at least one person alive who knew them in life. Spirits who are lucky enough to discover places of power may be able to manifest themselves visually, or even physically, but most spirits are only able to speak - and then, only able to be heard by those who knew the spirit in life.

    There are some spirits who choose never to go to the Netherworld. Instead, they find a way to tie themselves to a place in the Great Above, becoming demonic in nature. Some very few spirits are allowed access to Heaven, becoming one of the lesser gods, either Annunaki or Igigi. Those who become demons may increase their power by obtaining worshipers, and then depose of a god and take their place in the Pantheon. Surprisingly, then, the afterlife has very turbulent politics, which most spirits never realize, simply heading down to the Netherworld to be judged.
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-03-01 at 10:35 AM.

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Artifice
    Artificers have talents of invention and creation that are far beyond even the best of ordinary craftsmen. They can produce finely wrought items whose cunning design improves on even masterwork quality weapons and armor and can create mechanical wonders that the population will marvel at for generations to come. Artificers do not use magic; their skill is entirely based on mechanical lore and native genius.

    Masterwork And Marvelous Items
    Artificers can produce masterworks in four different ways: with the normal method available to any other craftsman; from scratch, with their own personally developed techniques; from an existing item or by making an existing masterwork into a marvelous item.

    Original Masterworks: To create a masterwork from scratch, the artificer can roll his Craft check as normal, multiplying his check result by the item’s DC for a single week of work, adding the numbers together until they reach the item’s market price in coin. If he draws upon his creative ingenuity, he can attempt to reduce the time and the money required. The process is very simple: he can raise the DC for his Craft check by +2 for every 10 gp he subtracts from the masterwork component’s price. Thus, an artificer can make a masterwork weapon component (100d, DC 20) as normal or he could opt to raise the DC to 26, and it would cost him 70gp.

    Masterworking an Item: Normally, when an item comes out of a craftsman’s workshop, there is nothing else that can be done to it; it is complete and finished. Artificers, who are always pondering how an item’s function could be improved, know how to add a masterwork component to items that are already built. The artificer can add +5 to the item’s original construction DC and add a masterwork component worth 200 gp; it takes more work to add masterwork quality to an item that is already completed. He can use the techniques described above to reduce the master component’s price by increasing its DC. Failing a check by 5 or more ruins half the masterwork materials, but leaves the original item intact.

    Superior Masterworks: The final and most revered tool in the artificer’s collection is the ability to create marvelous items from items that are already masterworks themselves. The artificer adds a second masterwork component layer on top of the original item while he makes additional adjustments to it to better accommodate the extra work. This second component is worth double the amount of the original (200 gp for weapons and 100 gp for armor and other items) and it has a DC of 25 to construct. As with all masterworks, the artificer can reduce the masterwork component’s cost by increasing the DC. A marvelous item provides a further +1 bonus to a normal masterwork. Failing a check by 5 or more ruins half the masterwork materials, and there is a flat 50% chance that it will also ruin the original item.

    Mechanical Wonders
    A technological wonder is handled in a way similar to how creatures are described with some additions and alterations to the required fields. The construction process fills out these qualities while determining their cost and difficulty to make.

    Spoiler
    Show
    Name: This is the name of the mechanical wonder, which should always incorporate the name of the artificer who made it or the name of the person for whom it was made. Mechanical wonders always have titles such as ‘The Fountain Of Xiomedes’ or ‘The Astounding Chess Player Of King Hazmath’.

    Type and Size: All technological wonders are constructs by definition. These rules present a number of subtypes that further define the technological wonder: static structure, vehicle, animated object, portable equipment, personal weapon and siege weapon, described later. The machine’s size depends a lot on the creator’s wishes as much as it depends on its function. A vehicle must be able to carry one or more people, while a personal weapon cannot exceed the intended user’s size. As the artificer designs his machine, he finds what the base size is for a machine with the functions he wishes and increases or decreases it with additional qualities.

    Structure Dice: Machines do not have hit points like ordinary creatures, nor do they have grievous wound thresholds but they have structure points. One structure point is equal to ten hit points.

    Hardness: All objects, including machines, have a hardness rating. Whenever an object takes hit point damage, subtract its hardness from the damage. Only damage in excess of its hardness is deducted from the object’s hit points. Do not subtract the hardness from damage dealt by weapons and attacks able to deal structure damage, such as other machines, since such attacks are meant to affect objects directly.

    Maneuverability: If the object can move or be moved, such as a vehicle or an animated object, it has a maneuverability mode and score. The maneuverability mode is the same as that described for flying creatures in the Adventuring chapter (clumsy, poor, average, good and perfect) and defines how well the machine moves. For movement modes other than flying, simply replace ‘fly’ with ‘walk’, ‘burrow’ or ‘swim’. For maritime vessels, ‘walk’ applies to their movement on the water’s surface, since ‘swim’ is meant for creatures and machines that can dive underwater. The maneuverability score is the machine equivalent to Initiative, determined by an artificially implanted Dexterity score, its subtype and any installed special qualities.

    Speed: How fast a mobile machine advances in the different movement modes. This entry also specifies if the machine is able to take the ‘run’ action or not.

    Turn Rate: Also for mobile machines, this specifies how much distance the machine covers before making a 45º turn. It supersedes the distance given by the maneuverability mode.

    Attacks: This entry lists all the attacks and attack bonuses of a machine’s weaponry. Only if the machine is able to move by itself does it roll on its own; otherwise, the number is an accuracy bonus granted to a wielder’s, operator’s or crew’s attack roll. Attacks listed here are from ‘normal’ weaponry or siege weaponry; attacks that stem from emulating a feat or ability go into the ‘special qualities’ field.

    Damage: Any weapon in a machine’s arsenal has its damage listed here. Some attacks may deal structure damage, in which case this is expressed as two damage types separated by a slash, the first to indicate hit point damage against creatures and the second for structure damage against objects.

    Special Qualities: Any effect that emulates feats or special abilities is listed here. Such abilities are very costly to emulate through machinery and some may not be possible at all at the Games Master’s discretion. The limit of what may be achieved will depend on the kind of campaign being run. A mythic campaign should set the limit fairly low; this is a genre in which flying mechanical horses pulled chariots, after all. Historical campaigns should have the limit set very high.

    Saves: Objects do not have any inherent saving throw. If unattended, they fail automatically. If a bonus is present here, it means that the machine is built in such a way as to give its wielder, operator or crew a bonus to their own save to protect their machine from harm.

    Abilities, Skills and Feats: Machines do not have any inherent ability scores, skill ranks nor feats, but the creator may emulate them through installing a function. The cost of doing this is expressed in Construction Points.

    Crew: The minimum number of operators a machine requires to perform its functions.

    Passengers: The number of creatures a mechanical wonder may accommodate in addition to the crew.

    Cost: The final cost in gp that the creator, sponsor or crew must spend to make the wonder. All costs may be split in any proportion amongst all the craftsmen that collaborate in making the technological wonder.


    Construction Points (CP)
    The system to build mechanical wonders has a basic building block: Construction Points, referred to as CP from now on. Every material, feature and deficiency carries a cost measured in points. As the player or GM make their choices on size, materials and abilities, they add the points assigned to each, or subtract points by intentionally introducing deficiencies. The final CP amount is then used to calculate all costs, as well as playing a part in the research and construction process.

    Construction Checklist
    Making a mechanical wonder is no easy task and these rules are a simplification of the process at best.

    Form and Function: Decide what the object is meant to do and what is its general shape. This step defines the wonder’s subtype and provides the blueprint for emulating abilities, skills, feats and other effects.
    Framework: What the object is made of. This step determines the wonder’s size, its hardness and a base difficulty for the Craft checks required to make its frame.
    Machine Components: The base technology of the wonder. Different levels of sophistication affect the wonder’s size, power and operation requirements.
    Power Sources and Conduits: Not being magical, machines do not run by themselves. A power source gives the necessary energy for the technological wonder to work and the conduits transmit that energy to the corresponding components.
    Extra Parts: the creator of a technological wonder can find that he ran out of space, or that he needs more power than was originally foreseen. In this phase he makes all the necessary adjustments: from adding extra space for wood-burning engines to installing a more compact mainspring to power the clockworks.
    Additional Features: Unsatisfied inventors can add additional features to their machine before it is finally ready. These features are exclusive to technological wonders and do not depend on emulating skills or feats.
    The Craft: Finally, add all of the wonder’s qualities together to determine the final costs as well as the DC for the different Craft checks that are required to make it, as well as how long it will take to build.

    What is it? What does it do?
    These are the questions an artificer must answer before sketching the first draft of his blueprints. The main drive when an artificer creates a mechanical device is need; either his own need or that of his patron. In response to the needs of the people, the artificers solved many mechanical problems in long-ago eras, creating devices that purified water or made it easy to move huge blocks of stone. Do not worry if an artificer’s invention should logically have meant that humans developed certain technologies sooner than they did; artificers are always coming up with devices that should not see the light of day until many years have passed but owing to the inability of ordinary craftsmen to use an artificer’s plans, these devices are always going to be very limited in their production, usually being one-offs at best.

    Construction Target (CT)
    The easiest way to code the range of possible machines into relatively simple rules is the Construction Target, a number that sums up what the technological wonder is and what it does. To calculate the Construction Target, simply add the numbers in the following tables for all the criteria that the wonder meets. The structural Construction Target adds the machine’s subtype as well as its abilities and installed feats and represents the machine’s size and materials. The performance Construction Target is the result of any skill ranks or special abilities being applied to the machine and reflects its components, power sources and conduits. Each Construction Target represents the minimum amount of Construction Points that a creator must spend for the machine to work. If the object’s CP cost is less than the Construction Target, the wonder simply will not work. Extra parts comprise the basic hardware, rods, beams, cogs and pistons necessary to complete the job and can reasonably be used to top up Construction Points in order to meet Construction Targets, or are components that grant additional, unforeseen or unusual characteristics to the machine.

    Form: Machine Subtype
    As mentioned before, all technological wonders are considered constructs but they have several subtypes that further define them:

    {table=head]Construction Target Type | Characteristic | Corresponding Elements

    Structural | Machine Subtype, Abilities, Feats. | Framework: Size and Shape, Materials; Extra Parts

    Performance | Skills, Special Abilities | Machine Components, Power Sources and Conduits, Extra Parts[/table]

    What Is It?
    {table=head]Form | SD | Craft DC | Construction Targets

    Static Structure |
    d12
    |
    +0
    |
    15

    Vehicle |
    d10
    |
    +1
    |
    10

    Animated Object |
    d12
    |
    +2
    |
    5

    Portable Equipment |
    d8
    |
    +0
    |
    2

    Personal Weapon |
    d8
    |
    +1
    |
    1
    [/table]

    Spoiler
    Show
    Static Structure: These machines are not moved, resting in place for a reason. Such wonders range from mechanical statues that open and close palace doors to improved mills that grind corn in a fraction of the time. Structures have a +2 hardness in addition to their material’s base and have a d12 Structure Dice. Structures do not move and therefore have no maneuverability, speed or turn rate. If a structure is to have mobility, it must be added as a special quality.

    Vehicle: Vehicles are made to move others. Vehicles have a base maneuverability, speed and turn rates depending on their size. The creator can modify these values by installing additional features.

    Vehicles
    {table=head]Vehicle Size | Maneuverability | Speed | Turn Rate

    Tiny (it happens) | Perfect (+2) | 15-ft. | 0-ft.

    Small |Good (+1) | 20-ft. | 5-ft.

    Medium | Average (+0) | 30-ft. |10-ft.

    Large | Average (-1) | 30-ft. | 20-ft.

    Huge | Poor (-2) | 40-ft. | 30-ft.

    Gargantuan | Clumsy (-4) | 40-ft. | 60-ft.

    Colossal | Clumsy (-6) | 30-ft. |120-ft.[/table]

    Animated Object: Creating an automaton is the dream of many an artificer. He who can make a machine in imitation of nature has proven himself to be in possession of talents that the Gods would envy. These complicated mechanisms are very hard to manufacture, especially when they are given humanoid form; mechanical people do not balance as well as organic ones and do not have enough space inside them for more than the most fine arrays of cogs, gears and chains. Objects animated by machinery require either very complicated or very large limbs and mechanisms in order to move, as they lack the benefit of magic to provide propulsion. However, they are more maneuverable than vehicles, since they are not designed to carry others though provision for such has been known and can be added as an improvisation or as a special feature.

    Animated Objects
    {table=head]Object Size | Maneuverability | Speed | Turn Rate

    Diminutive | Perfect (-1) | 10-ft. | 0-ft.

    Tiny | Perfect (+2) | 15-ft. | 0-ft.

    Small | Good (+1) | 20-ft. | 0-ft.

    Medium | Average (+0) | 30-ft. | 0-ft

    Large | Average (-1) | 30-ft. | 0-ft.

    Huge | Poor (-2) | 20-ft. |10-ft.

    Gargantuan | Clumsy (-4) | 20-ft. | 20-ft.

    Colossal | Clumsy (-6) | 15-ft. | 30-ft.[/table]

    Portable Equipment: Characters can theoretically carry these items. Portable equipment does not move by itself, though the feature may be added.

    Personal Weapon: Artificers occasionally build contraptions that are intended for use as weapons. Most warriors and noble warriors are very suspicious of such things, preferring the reliability of a proven sword or bow to some bizarre product of an artificer’s brain. Using mechanical equipment to fight with is seen as dishonorable by many combatants; if one wants the best in equipment, one should appeal to the Gods to lend their heavenly weapons and items, not resort to human ingenuity.

    A warrior who uses a mechanical personal weapon built by an artificer (as opposed to a masterwork or marvelous weapon) may not use his Reputation bonus while he carries the weapon, nor for 1d3 months afterwards.


    Movement and Propulsion
    Vehicles and animated objects are designed to move and travel. At the planning stage, the creator must decide what method of movement the machine will use. Surface movement through easy terrain and water can be achieved without cost by adding wheels, legs or by declaring the machine a sailing or oared ship. If the machine is required to have some form of special movement, it must be added as a function, either emulating a skill or requiring a special cost in CP. A technological wonder may only have one base method of travel, though more can be added separately. To add surface movement, simply +1CP to the cost of the base movement. Any other kind of movement must be added as an extra function.

    The different movement methods have the maneuverability, speed and turn rate defined in their corresponding table and can be achieved by emulating the following skills, feats and special abilities:

    {table=head]Movement | Requires

    Burrow | 222 construction points.

    Fly under own speed (e.g. wings) | 86 construction points.

    Lift off from ground only (e.g. balloon) * | 10 construction points.

    Underwater # | Emulate Swim skill.

    Rough or steep terrain | Emulate Climb skill.

    Vertical surfaces | 10 construction points.[/table]
    *Device can only raise or lower itself and requires sails or some similar means of propulsion to move in a constant direction.
    # The creator should install a method to allow breathing and visibility.

    Function
    The easiest way to define what a mechanical wonder does with hard rules is to have it emulate certain character-specific qualities, such as ability scores, skills and feats. If a player comes up with an effect not covered by any of the existing options for the aforementioned qualities, the GM should assign it a Construction Point value using the body of these rules as a guideline. Write the Construction Target for each function in its own row before adding it all up and, in the Craft step, dedicate a number of Construction Points to pay for effects that would emulate that quality and achieve the function, thus assigning a ‘machine part’ for it.

    What Does It Do?
    {table=head]Function|Construction Target

    Reproduce an ability (physical)|2 (per point)

    Reproduce an ability (mental) |3 (per point)

    Reproduce a skill (Str and Dex)| 1 (per 5 ranks)

    Reproduce a skill (Int and Wis) |2 (per 5 ranks)

    Skill has a user focus | +1

    Reproduce a general feat | 2[/table]

    Spoiler
    Show
    Abilities: It is not common to grant machines an ability score, although it may come in handy if it is meant to have multiple purposes or have many skills based on that ability. Physical abilities are easier to install, since they have a real and measurable effect. A strong machine is capable of exerting force on its surroundings like lifting and carrying weight or attacking, while a dexterous one either moves fast or can manipulate other objects. As a construct, a technological wonder cannot have a Constitution score.

    Mental scores are trickier to justify and should definitely remain within the realm of a mythic campaign. Artificers who create intelligent machines are coming dangerously close to claiming the Gods’ own prerogative. Nonetheless, machines that emulate intelligence do exist in the myths and in more contemporary retellings thereof, so they may be built. An intelligent machine is capable of remembering and processing great amounts of information while a wise one may have acute sensory features. No machine has a personality and therefore no Charisma rating.

    The Construction Target lists the cost for a single point in a score; above a certain threshold, the points are more expensive. Multiply the Construction Target listed for reproducing an ability by the corresponding factor in the next table to determine the final Construction Target for each ability score.

    For example, an ability score of 13 would cost you 13 points, while an ability score of 16 would cost you 18 points: 14 points to raise the score to 14, and then 4 points to raise the score by a further two and reach the target of 16.

    High Ability Costs
    {table=head]Score | Construction Target multiplier

    1-14 |
    x1

    15-16|
    x2

    17-18 |
    x3

    19-20|
    x4

    21-22 |
    x5

    23-24 |
    x6

    25+ |Add 1 to the multiplier for every 2 points[/table]

    Feats: The true genius of artifice lies in this stage, the application of additional features to an object by granting it skills and feats as if it were a character. The skills and feats do not work exactly as they would for characters, but they certainly make the object behave strangely. General feats are installed normally. Special feats cannot be installed, as they depend on a character’s special abilities and cannot be reproduced by a machine.

    Combat feats like Weapon Focus and Cleave can usually only be installed on personal weapons. There are exceptions, such as a vehicle having Spirited Charge.

    The listed Construction Target is for feats with no prerequisites. Add the Construction Target as many times as there are prerequisites.

    Skills: An artificer can build a mechanical marvel so that it uses a skill itself, such as a chariot that has the skill of moving silently, or so that it allows another person to use the skill, such as a pair of boots that enable the wearer to move silently. Physical skills are easier to install than mental skills and, if the machine does have a score in the skill’s key ability, the ability modifier applies. Determine if the skill will be used by the machine (object focus) or by an operator (user focus) and, while using that function, use the appropriate ability score, either the one for the machine or the one for the operator. Mechanical marvels can never be built with Prayer skill included, neither to use the skills themselves nor to confer a bonus upon another character’s use thereof. Installing skills follows a similar process to installing an ability score; the Construction Target in the table lists the cost per rank for skills with an object focus. Even if a machine cannot have a Charisma score, it can have Charisma-based skills installed. The guidelines below explain what the construction can do with skill ranks.

    Spoiler
    Show
    Balance (Dex): Items with an object focus enhancement may remain steady by themselves, which is useful for vehicles moving over uneven surfaces. If a moving vehicle succeeds in a Balance check (DC 15, or GM’s discretion), it remains stable enough so that ranged attacks fired from it suffer no penalties and spellcasters do not need to roll a Concentration check to cast.

    Climb (Str): Items that can climb by themselves (other than vehicles) cannot carry other characters while climbing; that is the function of a user focus skill enhancement, to grant a bonus to a character’s own Climb check.

    Concentration (Con): Any item that aids in Concentration checks (with a user focus) most forcibly cover the user’s head somehow. It imposes a penalty to Listen and Spot checks equal to the bonus it grants to Concentration and a -1 penalty to AC

    Craft (Int): Items that complement a Craft are even better than masterwork tools. Artificers will frequently build their own mechanical lathes, drills and saws so that they can build even bigger and better marvels. Like the skill itself, an item made to complement a specific Craft is useless for another, although the GM may give a reduced bonus for closely related crafts.

    Disguise (Cha): An item with Disguise ranks is more than meets the eye. It can disguise itself as another item of the same size, and the craftsman chooses the seeming at the moment of creating the enhancement. The disguise form does not work as if it was a normal object of that kind; it just hides the true nature of the original. The object rolls its Disguise check at the moment of ‘transmogrification’ and casual observers must beat the result with a Spot check to realize that it is an object in disguise.

    Escape Artist (Dex): The only special provision for such an item is that it must be close to the source of entrapment, such as a suit of armor that features retractable blades in the bracers to cut ropes. The method of escape must be determined at creation and it may not apply for all situations that call for an Escape Artist check.

    Handle Animal (Cha): An item intended to handle animals is built for a particular species, suffering a -2 penalty when dealing with similar creatures, -4 when applied to wildly different creatures and -6 for members of another creature type.

    Heal (Wis) and Medicine (Int): Healing devices are frightening. Even if such an item has beneficial effects, the mere thought of having it touching parts of one’s body grants its user a +2 morale bonus to Intimidate checks.

    Hide (Dex): Like the Disguise skill, items equipped with a Hide enhancement are quite unusual, able to camouflage themselves and/or their owner, depending on their focus. While the ability is working, the object cannot move or be moved without ruining the hide attempt.

    Jump (Str): Jumping items are not restricted by their height for maximum jumping distance. Items that complement a character’s Jump checks add 1 foot to his height for purposes of determining maximum jumping distance.

    Listen (Wis): A character must be actively using the item in conjunction with Listen checks in order to work; it does not activate automatically and the character may very well be surprised by silent enemies.

    Move Silently (Dex): Taking the form of padding, carefully wrought suspension springs or extra grease on the connections between plates, this enhancement is always active. A vehicle with this enhancement or a character benefiting from it loses five feet of its speed.

    Perform (Cha): Items enhanced with Perform ranks resemble musical instruments.

    Presence (Cha): An item is either built to incorporate the intimidating or the seductive use of this skill, never both. Intimidating items look frightful and ominous and are often covered in spikes and demonic heads. Mechanical devices can never help a person make a seduction attempt with Presence, though mechanical courtesans can have Presence skill ranks whereby they can make their own seduction attempts.

    Stranger things have been known! One legend even tells of a mechanical courtesan who was given to a king as a gift and who then proved to be the perfect assassin, killing him with one stroke and incapable of betraying her builder.

    Profession (Wis): Items that complement a Profession are even better than masterwork tools. Like the skill itself, an item made to complement a specific profession is useless for another, although the GM may give a reduced bonus for closely related professions. Depending on the Profession, they can have a complexity of 1 though 3, defined by the Games Master.

    Ride (Dex): Riding aids tend to spook a mount, inflicting a morale penalty on the rider’s Handle Animal checks equal to the bonus it gives to Ride checks. Mounts with 6 or higher Intelligence do not scare so easily but take offence at having such an item used on them.

    Search (Wis): When making an item that helps in Search checks, the craftsman must specify what the item is good at searching for. For example, you could have an item that uses a careful balance of internal salts to look for water deposits, or a tracking lens that helped find small dropped objects.

    Sense Motive (Wis): In order to work properly, an item with Sense Motive ranks must be no further than one inch per skill rank from the subject of the check.

    Sleight of Hand (Dex): Items that enhance the user’s Sleight of Hand checks, such as extensible graspers, must be quick, precise and sturdy. Ranks for this skill cost double to install in an item.

    Spot (Wis): Spotting items work like Listen items; they must be activated and in use in order to work

    Swim (Str): Boats with Swim ranks are independently powered and can move by themselves at 10 feet per round. A swimming device that aids the operator is not very resilient; due to the strain of pulling a character and keeping him afloat, it has a 5% chance of seizing up altogether and ceasing to function for every two Swim checks it complements.

    Tumble (Dex): Whether their Tumble ranks are focused on the object or its user, the Tumble check only allows the character or item to move up to 20 feet while tumbling and cannot prevent damage from falling.

    Use Rope (Dex): Objects cannot make special knots by themselves and are not particularly useful for tying creatures, suffering a -2 on their checks. When used as tools to complement a character’s Use Rope checks, they work normally, but they can only make one kind of special knot, defined at the time of construction.


    Framework
    Now that the basic form and function of the wonder are set, it is time to get down to details. From now on, all the costs are expressed in Construction Points that resolve into the machine’s real price and are used to meet the Construction Targets for the overall plan and for individual features.

    Frame’s Space Units
    {table=head]Size | CP | SD | Static Structure | Vehicle | Animated Object | Personal Weapon | Portable Equipment

    (1) Fine|
    3
    |
    1
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    3
    |
    3

    (2) Diminutive|
    5
    |
    1
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    4
    |
    4
    |
    3

    (3) Tiny |
    9
    |
    1
    |
    8
    |
    4
    |
    8
    |
    8
    |
    3

    (4) Small| 1
    8
    |
    2
    |
    16
    |
    8
    |
    16
    |
    16
    |
    4

    (5) Medium |
    36
    |
    4
    |
    32
    |
    16
    |
    3
    |
    32
    |
    8

    (6) Large|
    72
    |
    6
    |
    64
    |
    32
    |
    4
    |
    64
    |
    16

    (7) Huge|
    144
    |
    8
    |
    128
    |
    64
    |
    8
    |
    128
    |
    32

    (8) Gargantuan|
    288
    |
    10
    |
    256
    |
    128
    |
    16
    |
    256
    |
    64

    (9) Colossal |
    576
    |
    12+
    |
    512
    |
    256
    |
    32
    |
    512
    |
    128
    [/table]
    * For Static Structures and Vehicles, 1 unit = 5 feet
    ** For Animated Objects, 1 unit = 6 inches (Fine to Small); 1 unit = 5-ft. (Medium-size and larger)
    *** For Personal Weapons and Portable Equipment, 1 unit = 6 inches

    Shape and Size
    Depending on the machine’s form, it has a pre-established shape that a creator may alter at will. The basic shape does not influence the final cost of the machine. The table below lists the number of space units a machine of a given subtype and size has available for distributing among its three dimensions: width, length and height. Each dimension must have at least one unit assigned to it. For static structures and vehicles, each unit represents a span of five feet for all size categories. For animated objects, the same value (1 unit = 5 ft. span) holds true for machines of Medium-size or larger, but for Small and smaller machines, each unit equals six inches (1/2 foot). For personal weapons and portable equipment, one unit equals a span of six inches. No machine may be more than twice as high as its width. The dimensions obtained are an approximation; they define a box inside which a machine should fit to qualify for that size category.

    For example, a Large animated object has four space units to distribute; assigning one to width, one to length and two to height results in a machine that can fit a space of five feet by five feet, with a maximum height of ten feet. The number of units also measures the machine’s capacity to support machine components for its special abilities, as described in its own section.

    Personal weapons and portable equipment handle size differently. Their size category means the size of a creature able to wield the weapon in one hand. A Medium-size weapon is not the same absolute size as a Medium-size creature, but such a creature may hold it in one hand without penalty. Size defines how many Structure Dice a machine rolls to determine its structure points and how many Construction Points it costs in order to meet the structural Construction Target requirement. The number between parentheses is the size category’s numerical value; use it when a rule calls for a number to add, subtract or multiply by the size category. Reducing space units also reduces the item’s cost. Subtract 1 CP from the machine’s total cost for every 2 units deducted from the total. You cannot take so many units that the machine drops one size category.

    Materials
    An important decision to make when planning a mechanical wonder is what it is going to be made off. Matters of cost and weight are cons to be considered, but balanced by the pros of resistance and efficiency. Cheap materials make for relatively inexpensive and easy construction, but they break down easily and need a lot of maintenance to keep running. More durable materials can take quite a beating and are very reliable but they are ultimately expensive.

    This material makes up the majority of the machine’s body, which means that it can have parts made of other materials that do not count towards the final cost. The material defines the machine’s hardness and the Difficulty Class for the appropriate Craft checks to make and repair.

    Materials do not have a CP cost, but instead they multiply the cost of the base shape and size. Cheap materials may not fulfill the machine’s structural Construction Target, which means that the deficit must be met with assorted parts. To calculate the machine’s final weight, square the number of space units it has and multiply it by the material’s listed weight modifier.

    Material
    {table=head]Material |CP Multiplier| Craft DC (make)| Craft DC (repair)| Weight Modifier| Hardness

    Wood |
    x1
    |
    10
    |
    10
    |x5 lb.|
    5

    Wood & Leather |
    x2
    |
    12
    |
    10
    | x8 lb.|
    6

    Stoneworks|
    x3
    |
    15
    |
    12
    | x10 lb. |
    8

    Bronze|
    x4
    |
    15
    |
    12
    |x16 lb.|
    10

    Iron |
    x5
    |
    18
    |
    16
    |x14 lb.|
    12
    [/table]

    Spoiler
    Show
    Wood and Leather: Carpentry is one of the easiest of the construction methods. Wood is pliable, abundant and easy to shape and replace in the likely case that it breaks under the strain of the machine’s workings. Wooden cogs and gears pulled by ropes that twist through pulleys and levers make up the inner workings of a wooden machine. When wooden and leather components are used in equal measure, such as for moving parts, the machine gains an extra measure of flexibility that keeps it from snapping its pieces apart.

    Stoneworks: Machines made out of stone are almost always structures. Dams, speaking statues of the Gods, chambers that amplify echoes, or secret passages that can be found but not opened without a key are just a few of the wonders that artificers can make with stone. Sometimes it is hard to tell when a stone structure is actually a technological wonder.

    Bronze: The middle point between endurance and cost, bronze is the most practical metal alloy, resistant but not as costly as iron. A machine with bronze workings can have parts made of other metals or even other materials, but they just serve as support and ornamentation to the main bronze body.

    Iron: As it has a higher melting point, iron is harder to process and shape than bronze but is much more resilient and sturdy.


    Machine Components
    The first of a technological wonder’s elements whose cost in Construction Points is used to meet the performance Construction Target, the machine component is the way an artificer applies his craftsmanship to make the abilities in his machine work. A judicious application of each kind of technology can power almost any kind of ability, if coupled with the right power source. A mechanical wonder can benefit from one or more applications of a technology type, but each entails its own Craft check. Simple technologies can be completed easily, but it takes much more effort to have them work as intended, while complex and sophisticated components are harder to make, but get the job done more efficiently by comparison.
    Take the Construction Target for each skill, ability or feat that the machine can perform and select one or more technology types that will make it work. Spend the amount of Construction Points that will match each Construction Target and make a note on the Craft DC of each component for each skill, ability or feat.

    Machine Component
    {table=head]Technology| Corresponding Crafts| Craft DC |Operation DC | Construction Points per space unit

    Simple Machines |Blacksmithing, carpentry, leatherworking, pottery, sculpture, shipmaking, stonemasonry.|
    12
    |
    10
    |
    2

    Complex Machines |Blacksmithing, wheelwright.|
    14
    |
    12
    |
    6

    Sophisticated Machines |Special: see above. |
    18
    |
    14
    |
    10
    [/table]

    Capacity
    Every mechanical wonder has a limited capacity as to how much machinery it can fit without needing further attachments and expansions to accommodate extra mechanisms. A machine’s size and subtype define its capacity, equaling the number of units a machine of that subtype has for that size, as defined in the framework phase of building a technological wonder. Technology types take space and the simpler it is, the more space it demands in order to reproduce a skill or ability. The table lists how many Construction Points can fit in a single unit.

    For example, an artificer is building a Large vehicle (32 units); if he were to use only simple machinery (2 Construction Points per unit), he can fit 64 Construction Points-worth of components in order to meet the machine’s performance Construction Target. If he were to use sophisticated machinery (10 points per unit), he would be able to fit 320 Construction Points-worth of components.

    If the Construction Points needed to meet the Construction Target exceed the machine’s capacity, the artificer must fit it with additional parts, which makes the machine more than a bit ungainly; see the section on extra parts. A character may add any combination of components as long as the Construction Points add up to a special ability’s Construction Target and they do not exceed the capacity. Note that the power source needed to activate each component also takes space so a few units should be left open for them.

    Minute Crafts
    The table considers the capacity for machines where a unit equals a span of five feet. For small machines where a unit equals a span of six inches (or less), the artificer must make a conscious effort to miniaturize the components he is working with. The machine’s capacity works as normal but the craftsman suffers a penalty to the Craft checks to assemble the components, representing the enormous care and difficulty of working with smaller machinery, as shown on the table below. The difficulty involved means that mechanical marvels tend to be built to a large scale; it is very much a genre of towering wooden horses and earth-shaking clockwork giants. Only the very best of artificers can create devices so elaborate that they fit into a small space.

    {table=head]Creature size|Small size modifier|Large size modifier|Space Unit Multiplier

    Fine|
    +2
    |
    -8
    |
    x1/4

    Diminutive|
    -2
    |
    -4
    |
    x1/2

    Tiny|
    -4
    |
    -2
    |
    x1/2

    Small|
    -5
    |
    -1
    |
    x1

    Medium|
    -6
    |
    +0
    |
    x1

    Large|
    -7
    |
    +1
    |
    x2

    Huge|
    -8
    |
    +2
    |
    x3

    Gargantuan|
    -10
    |
    +4
    |
    x4

    Colossal|
    -14
    |
    +8
    |
    x6
    [/table]

    Technology Types
    There are three main types of technology an artificer can use to make his mechanical wonder operate. Each type contains a wide variety of components that would be nightmarish to include individually in a rules system, so they are simply grouped together in the technology type. Each type has related crafts used in its construction. An artificer must have at least 5 ranks in any of the corresponding Craft skills in order to build a mechanism of that type. Also, each technology type requires a specific drive system, converter or conduit that will power the technological wonder’s functions. Operating the machinery requires a capable engineer, pilot, helmsman or member of any profession who would know how to work it. To activate each ability, regardless of its duration, an operator makes a Craft or Profession check with a DC set by the technology type, or a Wisdom or Intelligence check (whichever is higher) if the operator does not possess any relevant skill. The machinery for each of the device’s abilities requires one crewman for every space unit that the components occupy. This operating procedure is independent of the operation of the power source, which needs its own crew. Mechanical marvels are always labor-intensive.

    Spoiler
    Show
    Simple Machines: Components that operate through mechanical force and can be made by the simplest of crafts. The wedge, screws, pulleys, levers, inclined plane, and wheels and axles are examples of simple machinery, such as artificers have been using for centuries.

    Complex Machines: These are either a clever combination of simple machines or operate under more advanced mechanical principles. Cogs and gears are an example of complex machinery, as are pistons, coiled springs, conveyor belts, latches and diaphragms. On the higher scale of advancement, steamworks, waterworks and clockworks are the pinnacle of complex machinery research.

    Sophisticated Machines: These are the contraptions that require the application of technical secrets now lost to humanity, whereby the angles of mirrors, the vibrations of crystals and the hum of tuning forks were said to work amazing transformations upon matter. This was not magic but a form of ancient science no less incredible. An artificer must use his Craft (blacksmithing) skill to make sophisticated machines but for the purpose of these skill checks, his Craft (blacksmithing) skill can be no higher than his Knowledge (mysteries) skill ranks. Even if an artificer has 16 ranks in Craft (blacksmithing), if he has a Knowledge (mysteries) skill ranking of 4, then that is his effective Craft (blacksmithing) skill for the purpose of building a sophisticated machine.
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-28 at 10:05 AM. Reason: Updated miniaturization rules
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    Kudur - The Bronze Age: A campaign setting using "D20 Fantasy" rules.

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    Power Sources and Conduits
    A technological wonder does not operate by itself; it needs fuel in the absence of magic to power its abilities. Artificers have developed several power sources that move different types of technology and call them ‘engines’, whether that power source is a wood-fired boiler or a great clockwork motor wound up by a key.

    As each of the technological wonder’s abilities has its own Construction Target and, therefore, their own components, they also have their own power sources. The engines take up space in the machine’s capacity as much as the components do. Some sources are more suited to certain types of technology, while others need some sort of converter to translate the energy they give off into the one the components need, thus increasing the space they require. A power source does not cost additional Construction Points, since the price is already included in the machine components it powers, but it has an effective CP cost for purposes of calculating its space. A power source’s effective Construction Points are one-fifth of the ability’s total CP cost and, depending on the technology it is powering and its own nature, takes up a number of space units indicated in the table.

    For example, an ability powered by ten Construction Points-worth of simple machinery (that take five space units) would have a power source with an effective CP cost of two. A mechanical power source for such an ability would take one space unit since, according to the table, a mechanical power source can fit two Construction Points per space unit when powering simple machinery. To make a power source, use the Craft skill for the technology type it is feeding. The Difficulty Class for making the power source is equal to the base technology type’s plus a modifier for the kind of power source.

    For example, an elemental power source feeding complex machinery has a DC 17 (14 for complex machinery +3 for elemental power source). A power source for miniaturized components is also miniaturized, suffering a -6 penalty on the Craft check. The DC to repair the power source is the same as that to create it. Most sources require a crew to activate or keep under operation. Doing so requires a skill check appropriate for the source’s nature and must be defined by the creator at the time of construction. Most of them will require a Profession skill such as engineer, siege engineer or even teamster, but it may require other skills, such as like Handle Animal for a device that is powered by a pony walking round a turnstile.

    Power Source Types
    Given the diversity of power methods that artificers can devise, the following are just guidelines for possible kinds of power sources and their operation. Players and GMs are advised to be both flexible and creative, coming up with details as needed or simply leaving the operation to narrative details.

    Power Sources
    {table=head]Power Source| Craft DC |Operation DC |Simple| Complex |Sophisticated

    Mechanical|
    +1
    |
    10
    |
    4
    |
    3
    |
    2

    Natural|
    +2
    |
    12
    |
    2
    |
    4
    |
    3

    Elemental|
    +3
    |
    14
    |
    2
    |
    2
    |
    4
    [/table]
    Numbers given in the chart above are CP per space unit

    Spoiler
    Show
    Mechanical Power: Creates energy by movement actively created by something or someone called an ‘operator’. Mechanical power sources range from oaring to manual operation cranks, springs and even the simple act of pushing, such as on pedals and pulling, such as on ropes or chains. In order to work, the machine needs constant operation of its power source and a crew of operators to do so. As a rule of thumb, one operator can work a mechanical power source for every two effective Construction Points of its ‘cost’. Operating a mechanical power source requires a skill or ability check with a DC 10.

    Natural Power: Uses the power of natural elements in order to create energy instead of manual operation, but uses almost all the same parts as mechanical power sources. Sails and fans like those on a windmill can harness the power of wind; the power of water is converted to motion by waterwheels in static machines and so on. If the GM allows the technology, magnetic charges from lodestones (fallen to earth as meteorites and very rare) can be used to rotate a magnetized wheel. A single operator can work a natural power source for every three effective Construction Points of its ‘cost’. Operating a natural power source requires a skill or ability check with a DC 12.

    Elemental Power: An improvement over natural power, elemental power sources apply a transforming process to an inert element in order to create energy. Steamworks are the best example of this for the application of heat to water; the ancient Greeks knew full well that engines could be driven by steam. The GM may also wish to allow esoteric power systems, such as alchemical capsules, dissolved in water, to provide energy or a system based around an ‘Atlantean’ crystal technology. The remains of urns said to be ancient pottery batteries have been retrieved from the ocean bed, so even an electric battery is not out of the question. A single operator can work an elemental power source for every two effective Construction Points of its ‘cost’. Operating an elemental power source requires a skill or ability check with a DC 14. Elemental power needs fuel, for which see below.


    Centralizing the Engine
    If a technological wonder has more abilities than one, it needs multiple power sources to feed each mechanism, but instead of making several engines for each mechanism, an artificer can instead make a single power source for all the wonder’s functions. To do this, add all the Construction Points of all the functions the machine possesses and divide by five to obtain the engine’s effective CP cost. Select the nature of the engine (mechanical, natural or elemental) and use the highest DC from the machine’s components, adding the power source’s DC modifier to calculate the final DC for the Craft check to construct the engine. As for space, use the lowest number from the Power Source Size table from the technology types present and reduce it by one. This last number is the Construction Points per space unit that the engine takes up.

    For example, a self-propelled war-chariot with an automated fire hurler works off a single steam-powered engine (elemental power source) to move the wagon’s wheels (simple mechanism) and the fire hurler (sophisticated mechanism), which have a combined CP cost of 24, giving the engine an effective CP cost of four. The Craft (blacksmithing) check to make the engine has a DC of 21 (DC 18 for a sophisticated mechanism, +3 for an elemental power source) and occupies one CP per space unit (elemental engines take 2 Construction Points per unit, minus 1), thus requiring that the machine have four units available for the engine.

    Fuel
    Elemental power sources require fuel to generate energy. Fuel is measured in charges, with each charge providing enough power for a single activation for instantaneous effects and a ten-minute duration for more sustained effects. At the creation of the engine, roll 2d4; the resultant number is the amount of raw materials in pounds needed to provide a single fuel charge and it does not change until the next repair check, when modifications to the engine may change its output. The creator determines the fuel when he creates the engine, which can be from such a logical source as coal or wood, or may be more exotic, such as pure gold or concentrated alcohol.

    Extra Parts
    Not all of the wonders that the artificers build are graceful, elegant finished products. Some of them, at least in their early stages of design, were wobbling top-heavy devices that seemed to have been built on excessively. When the mechanisms fall short of their intended function or are found to be too large to be incorporated into the original design, extra parts come to the rescue. Taking the form of attachments and extensions, these extra parts are attached to the main body of the mechanism to provide those extra few inches of containment space or keep one important moving part from repeatedly whacking into another.

    In terms of description, players and GMs can and should go wild; the extra parts serve no additional function nor add benefits or restrictions to the machine, so they can be anything from structural reinforcement to amazingly sturdy decoration. Extra parts are provided to serve two purposes in the creation of a mechanical wonder:

    Meeting the Construction Target: When the machine’s Construction Points for the chosen frame do not complete the form and function’s Construction Target, the artificer may add reinforcements, counterweights and other parts to complete the frame’s Construction Points.

    Extending the Frame’s Capacity: When an artificer has spent too long locked away in his workshop, he will often include special functions that a machine’s original design was not prepared to support, adding extra parts like platforms, rigging, beams and other protrusions that extend a frame’s capacity. Extra parts for this function do affect the machine. Add the number of Construction Points by which the extra parts exceed the capacity of the machine’s final cost; divide this excess by the technology’s Construction Points-per-space unit as listed in the corresponding tables and add those size units to the machine’s frame. If the expanded spaces now take the frame to the next size category, it acquires all the characteristics of its new size. A -1 size penalty is applied to all operation and activation checks, as well as the rolls for all special abilities such as attack rolls, saving throws and the like. The machine was not meant to be this size and its performance suffers as a result.

    Additional Features
    After calculating all the costs, the creator may still not be satisfied with the fruits of his labors and may wish to install additional features. The following features affect the way that machines operate but do not require their own components or power source, so they do not affect a machine’s size. Their cost in Construction Points is added in the Extra Parts phase. The Craft skill required to make such additions is the same as the one used to build the frame, with the same DC.

    Spoiler
    Show
    Agility: The base movement characteristics provided for vehicles and animated objects may not suit the creator’s tastes. Through this feature the machine’s speed, maneuverability or turn rate may be improved. For each instance of this feature that the artificer installs, the machine’s speed increases by ten feet, its maneuverability is now one category higher with a +1 modifier or its turn rate decreases by ten feet. Only one of the characteristics can be enhanced at a time, but this feature may be added up to three times to each characteristic. Cost: 2 CP.

    Appendage: An appendage is fitted at the end of an arm and gives the mechanical wonder the ability to grab things. Whether hand, tentacle, clamp or pincer, the machine can use it to take things without needing a crew to secure it to the arm, or can change weapons of its size without having them mounted. An appendage needs the Extremity (arm) feature before it is installed. Cost: 1 CP x half the size value.

    Automated: The machine components or the power sources are built in such a way that they require fewer crewmembers than normal. Reduce the number of operators required by one for every CP spent on this feature, to a minimum of one operator (someone must pull the lever). The number of operators for a power source can be reduced to zero if the machine has a piloting cockpit or a control bridge. Cost: varies.

    Control Bridge: Like a piloting cockpit, a control bridge concentrates the activation and operation of all the machine’s functions in the same space, in this case a room to contain the machine’s controllers and operators. One console sits a single operator and controls one of the machine’s functions.
    Only machines whose space units equal five foot spans can have a control bridge. Unlike other features except the piloting cockpit, a control bridge occupies space, requiring a base three space units, plus an additional space unit per console. This measure assumes that the crewmen are Small or Medium-size creatures. Double the space units required for a bridge designed for Large creatures and triple it for Huge crew members. This space can be added with extra parts. Cost: 2 CP per console.

    Extremity: The machine has either an arm or a leg. An arm grants the technological wonder a reach as if it was a creature of the same size category (determine if it is long or tall); this arm may be used for manipulation (such as a mechanical cargo arm) or for attack if it has a weapon mounted. A leg grants the machine some measure of walking mobility with the same movement characteristics as a vehicle of its same size; note that a machine with only one leg needs to have at least five ranks installed in the Balance skill. Adding this feature more than once either adds another extremity (each arm needs an operator, all legs can work under the same operator) or doubles the length of an installed extremity (double the reach for arms, add ten feet to the machine’s speed for legs). Cost: 1 CP x size value.

    Improved Handling: Some artificers remember that they will not be the only ones to operate a machine and take pains to ensure that it will be usable by others. This feature is applied to a single function, which now grants a +2 bonus to any skill check or other roll used to activate it. The feature’s bonus applies to attack rolls if installed on a personal weapon, or to a mounted weapon that is not a technological wonder itself, but is mounted on one. Cost: 3 Construction Points.

    Mobility: Only vehicles and animated objects are designed to move, but other kinds of technological wonders can have their own propulsion methods. This feature grants the machine the movement characteristics of an animated object of its size if the machine is a personal weapon or portable equipment, and the characteristics of a vehicle if the machine is a structure. Like vehicles and animated objects, the creator must choose the form of movement and implement it by adding functions as normal. This feature only offers the possibility of movement, not the exact method. Cost: 2 CP.

    Piloting Cockpit: The machine has a chamber just the size of an intended pilot. The pilot, who must have ranks in a specific Profession (pilot wonder) skill, can activate all the functions and power sources of the technological wonder from levers, buttons and panels within arm’s reach. Only machines whose space units equal five foot spans can have a cockpit. Unlike other features except the control bridge, a piloting cockpit occupies space, requiring three space units to fit Small and Medium-size pilots, four for Large pilots and eight for Huge pilots. This space can be added with extra parts. Cost: 3 CP.

    Single Switch: The machine components that make an ability work and their power source are linked. A single crewman can activate both at once, using the highest DC to activate. This feature only applies to a single ability; to install a single switch to the rest of the abilities, add it to each separately. If a machine has a single power source for all of its abilities, the machine components cannot have the single switch installed, as the power source definitely needs its own crew. Cost: 1 CP.


    The Craft
    Now the real fun begins: actually building the machine. The crafting of the machine occurs in three steps:

    • Build the frame.
    • Add the machine components and power sources.
    • Add extra parts and additional features.

    If the creator is working alone, he proceeds in order but if there is a team involved, they can perform steps two and three at the same time. What happens in each step is that the player tallies the Construction Points of the creation at that stage.

    If all went well, the CP amount equals the Construction Target, but sometimes it goes over.

    Each CP for a large creation (vehicle, structure, etc.) is worth 500 gp, while each CP for a personal weapon or portable equipment is worth 100 gp. Multiply the final CP cost by that amount to obtain the technological wonder’s final market price. After this, all normal rules for making items with the Craft skill apply. The market price multiplied by ten becomes the target value that all accumulated Craft checks must reach to consider the machine completed, with one check per week of work and with the cost of raw materials being one-third of the final market price.

    Some bonuses may also apply to the craft checks - for every week beyond the first spent crafting in the same location, the artificer may take a +1 bonus for having matierials prepared from previous days, to a maximum of +3. Additionally, the artificer gains a +4 bonus from being in a specially prepared laboratory or manufacturing setting, at the GM's discretion to what can be counted as a laboratory.

    Deficiencies
    If a Craft checks fails, no progress is made for that week of work. If any of the checks fail by 5 or more, half the raw materials are ruined and must be paid for again. If any of the checks fail by 10 or more, or in the case of a natural 1, not only are half the materials ruined, the craftsmen also introduced a deficiency in the construction. During any activation, or once per hour of constant activation, there is a 5% chance that the machine will malfunction. A malfunctioning mechanical wonder seizes up completely; a suitable Craft check must be made to repair it, for which see below. Loss of raw materials due to a failed check only affects the step in which the failure occurred. Failing to build the machine’s frame does not affect the materials for the mechanical components. Also, loss of material and malfunction chances that occur during the second step of construction only affect the ability that the failed components are meant to support. Failure while adding extra parts only entails loss of material and cannot introduce or increase malfunction chances.

    Operation
    Operating the mechanical wonder is a matter of skill checks. The skills that work best for machinery are the Craft skills used to make the different components. Ad hoc Profession skills may be created to cover the operation of different abilities, such as Profession (pilot wonder), although others may apply if the item resembles more mundane equipment; such as a sailor being able to work the riggings of a flying ship. Most DCs in a machine’s operation appear in the component and power source tables, but the Games Master can determine that using a machine requires an overall skill check, or the machine can have the Automated feature that allow it to be activated by use.

    Spoiler
    Show
    Movement: The operation of a moving machine depends on its method of movement. Vehicles need a pilot or helmsman to move and this special operator makes skill checks as if he were operating a normal, similar movement. Maritime vehicles and ships that fly by the power of the wind would need the Profession (sailor) skill, while an animal-drawn vehicle would need the Handle Animal skill. The Profession (pilot wonder) skill is a catchall skill, usually only gained by artificers and the children of artificers, that allows characters to control the movement of any mobile technological wonder. Routine movement should not need skill checks except during the first round that it moves. In combat situations, the pilot should roll a check for each round of movement, with failure meaning that the machine does not move as intended; roll 1d8 to determine the actual direction that the machine moves. One represents forward and going clockwise (two is forward and right, three is right, etc.) if the result is the desired direction, the machine does not move, but can still perform other actions.

    Attack: Combat requires that the machine has weapons or attack modes. Large machines have a crew operating each weapon and it is that crew that makes their skill check as if it was an attack roll. Profession (engineer, siege engineer) is ideal for this task, but a Games Master may allow the existence of Profession (gunner). A weapon gives a bonus to attack to its crew if it has the Improved Handling feature or the emulated Weapon Focus feat. A weapon can only attack once per turn, which is why multiple weapon mountings are valuable in a war machine.

    Abilities and Functions: Machines have special attacks or abilities if they have them installed as emulated feats. Using them requires that a crew activate their mechanism along with their power source as described under machine components and power sources. Reloading time should be 1d4 rounds, but the GM can increase this or set the number.


    Repairs and Maintenance
    Proud inventors almost always have a team of craftsmen to provide regular or emergency maintenance for their creations, sometimes even as part of the regular crew. Living beings heal damage naturally, but machines need to be repaired. Only an artificer can safely direct repairs on a mechanical wonder. If a craftsman without the Artifice special ability attempts to do so, his Craft skill checks are made at a –4 insight penalty. A repair check is a Craft check of the same kind and with the Difficulty Class given for the material used to build the technological wonder’s frame, modified by the amount of damage it has suffered. The Craft check represents one week of work in which the craftsmen spend one-tenth of the machine’s final market price in replacement parts and materials. Subtract the check’s DC from the final roll result and multiply by two. This is the amount of structure points that the construct recovers in that week. Machines reduced to zero structure points are destroyed and useless except for scrap material.

    Repair Modifiers
    {table=head]Damage Condition| DC modifier

    1 hit point remaining |
    +6

    25% of total hit points remaining|
    +4

    50% of total hit points remaining |
    +2

    75% of total hit points remaining |
    +1
    [/table]
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-28 at 10:12 AM. Reason: Updated cost per CP and Craft check bonuses
    GM of Ancient Battles: A homebrew warfare game based on Testament

    Kudur - The Bronze Age: A campaign setting using "D20 Fantasy" rules.

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Example of Artifice:

    *NOTE*
    This example is now out of date. The artifact rule discussion that took place here changed the basic artifice rules and invalidated this example. It is left here for legacy purposes, and as a good guide for how to use the rules, even if the rules quoted have changed.


    Icarus was imprisoned, with his father Daedalus, in a tower on Crete, by the king Minos. Daedalus contrived to make his escape from the prison he was in, but could not leave the island by sea, as the king kept strict watch on all the vessels, and permitted none to sail without being carefully searched. "Minos may control the land and sea," said Daedalus, "but not the regions of the air. I will try that way." So he set to work to fabricate wings for himself and his young son Icarus. He wrought feathers together beginning with the smallest and adding larger, so as to form an increasing surface. The larger ones he secured with thread and the smaller with wax, and gave the whole a gentle curvature like the wings of a bird. Icarus played and handled the wax with his fingers while his father laboredand thus impeded his work. At last Daedalus's work was completed. He beat his wings and suspended himself in the air. - Bullfinch's Mythology, as cited in Wikipedia

    Form and Function: Daedalus wants to make a pair of wings for himself out of feathers, wax, string, and wood. This will be a machine subtype, and will be portable equipment, rather than a vehicle (the wings work with their user, rather than independantly of their user).

    Portable equipment has a d8 Structure Die (SD), and a base construction target (CT) of 2. This means that the artifact must contain at least two Construction Points (CP) to work.

    Daedalus wants the wings to add flight to their user. They are not meant to fly under their own power, so the +86 CT for vehicles with flight is ignored. Instead, the wings must be able to carry Daedalus' weight, and move him through the air - mimicing the strength abilities, and adding the flight ability to the user. This means that the wings must lift Daedalus (who weighs 125 lbs, and normally the weight of his gear - but since he is making these wings from under house arrest, he has nothing to take with him), requiring in turn a strength of at least 13 (heavy load), but he decides to make them with a strength of 15, so that the wings will be under "medium load" conditions while carrying him.

    A strength of 15 increases the CT by 32 - two for every point of strength up to 14, and 4 for the fifteenth point of strength. The CT for the wings is now 34. The flight ability will be a user focus, adding to their (non-existant) flight checks, increasing the CT by another 1, to 35 CT.

    The DM rules that the flight skill functions like the swim skill, and so Daedalus adds 10 points of Flight skill to the wings, ensuring that they will stay aloft (with take-10s). Each skill point of Flight costs 1 CT, bringing the CT to 55.

    Wings of Daedalus: CT 55

    Framework: Now that Daedalus has a general idea of the cost of the wings in terms of the construction target, he can begin designing the frame. Portable equipment takes the size of the user it is designed for, so the wings will be medium-sized. According to the chart, that means that there are 8 space units (each six inches in size) to assign to the wings. That allows for the wings to be three feet long x one foot wide x negligible depth. Three feet long is about the length of a human's out-stretched arms, but the wings should ideally be longer to allow the human to glide more easily. Well, the easiest way to do that is to up the category from Medium to Large.

    Now, Daedalus has 16 size units to adjust. We'll use the same negligible depth, but increase the wingspan from 3 feet to 6 feet, and make the width 2 feet. That sounds about right for the wingspan - longer than Daedalus is tall, wide enough to catch air, and thin enough to weigh little.

    The CP for the frame is 72, according to the chart, which already is larger than our 65 CT. Excellent - Daedalus won't have to worry about adding extra parts. That also gives the wings 6 SD - a little much for the fragile nature of the wings, but suggesting a good sturdy structure.

    Next, the materials - the wings will be made of Wax, wood and feathers. The chart doesn't contain any materials other than wood, but the DM determines that Wax and Feathers are lesser components than wood, dropping the CP cost by .25, but keeping the craft and repair DCs at 10. The DM also drops the weight modifier by 50%, as wax and feathers are lighter than a solid wood structure.

    This means that the CP of the frame now stands at 54 CP, less than the 55 CT (DM ruling - not a usual occurance). It weighs 40 lbs (2.5 lbs*16 space units), and it has a hardness of 5, due to its wooden frame.

    Machine Components: All of the machine components that Daedalus has available to him are simple machines, so each ability requires simple machine checks. It also means that the wings can fit up to 32 CP (16 space units * 2 CP/unit for simple machines) of machinery.

    So, 15 CP of machinery is used for the strength ability, and 10 CP for the flight skill. That brings the total spent CP to 79. The wings are powered by a mechanical power source (Daedalus himself) and by a natural power source (gliding on the wind). He decides that the strength ability is powered by mechanics and that the flight skill is powered by the wind. Because power sources require 1/5 the CP of their ability, Daedalus adds 3 CP for the strength ability, and 2 CP for the flight skill, to a total of 5 CP of power sources. The total CP for the wings is now 84. Because the power source is converting human muscle and wind into mechanical energy, Daedalus does not need to select a fuel.

    Extra Parts: Daedalus has planned well, and his 84 CP exceeds his CT of 55. Additionally, his wings do not require more capacity for the machine parts to keep them flapping in the wind, as the capacity of 32 CP exceeds the used capacity of 30 CP (25 from the machinery from strength and flight, and 5 from the power source). However, the huge and ungainly wings start at a clumsy maneuverability - Daedalus wants to improve that maneuverability three times, to a Good maneuverability. According to the additional features chart, he can spend 6 CP on Agility modifications to do this, bringing the total CP to 90.

    Crafting

    Each CP is 500 gp of market price, so multiplying reveals a final market price of 45,000 gp for the Wings of Daedalus. As portable equipment, each craft check that Daedalus makes is at -6, due to the difficulty of miniaturizing the parts and the intricacy of the work. Fortunately, Daedalus is an experienced artificer, and has 20 Craft (Woodworking) skill points.

    To craft the wings, Daedalus must first build the frame, then add the machinery, and finally tweak its agility. These all require separate craft checks. Because Daedalus has 10 levels of artificer, he can make three craft checks per week rather than the usual one.

    The frame has a 10 craft DC, and contains 54 CP, or 27,000 gp worth of materials. The cost of the materials is 9,000 gp, but Daedalus has access to as much wood, wax, and feathers as he needs from the house he is in.

    The first week of crafting the frame, Daedalus decides to take 10 on his three craft checks. This gives him a score of 24 (10 (taken) + 20 (Craft: woodworking) - 6 (miniature components)) per craft check, building 72 gp of the frame total (Craft checks of 24 x 10 DC = 240 sp x 3 checks/week = 720 sp = 72 gp). At this rate, it will take Daedalus 375 weeks (or seven years) to fashion the frame of the wings. This is understandable, as the work involved is incredibly precise.

    Next, Daedalus must craft the machinery and fix it into place onto the frame, along with the material which converts his natural power source and mechanical power source into power for the machinery. Again, because of the size of the wings, Daedalus takes a -6 to his craft check.

    The machinery takes up 25 CP (or 12,500 gp), and as simple machinery, has a craft DC of 12. This time, Daedalus rolls his craft checks instead of taking 10. The first week, his rolls plus his bonus are 25, 21, and 24. Multiplying by the DC of 12 gives 300, 252, and 288 sp, or 84 gp of progress He continues this process, averaging a slightly better 80 gp per week. At this rate, it takes him 156 weeks, or 3 more years to complete the machinery.

    Next, Daedalus must add the power source. The mechanical power source for the strength ability has a DC of 13 (12 from simple machinery, +1 for the mechanical power source). There are 3 CP of the first power source, or 1500 gp. Daedalus decides to roll this out, rolling 29 (377), 18 (234), and 28 (364) the first week. This gives 975 sp, or 97.5 gp of progress.

    The next week, he rolls 24, 29, 31, adding another 1068 sp to the total, bringing him to 2043 out of the 15,000 needed. Continuing, it takes him another 41 weeks to finish the first power source.

    The second power source (for the flight skill) has a DC of 14 (12 from simple machinery, +2 for natural power source). It is only 2 CP of work, or 1000 gp. Working as before, it takes him 30 weeks to finish this power source.

    Finally, Daedalus decides to forgo the agility boost - he's spent over 11 years working on this one set of wings!

    Final stats:
    Name: Wings of Daedalus
    Type and Size: Large Construct (Portable Equipment)

    Structure Dice: 6d8
    Hardness: 5
    Maneuverability: Fly: Clumsy
    Speed: 20 ft/round
    Turn Rate: 0 ft
    Attacks: none
    Damage: none
    Special Qualities: Allows user to fly
    Saves: none
    Abilities, Skills and Feats: Strength: 15, Flight: 10
    Crew: 1
    Passengers: 0
    Cost: 42,000 gp

    Something still seems off about the amount of time it takes. Maybe Icarus adds into the equation, doing "aid-another" checks? Any suggestions to improve this mechanic would be greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-02-28 at 10:14 AM.
    GM of Ancient Battles: A homebrew warfare game based on Testament

    Kudur - The Bronze Age: A campaign setting using "D20 Fantasy" rules.

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    I've updated the cosmology section - I plan to include a template for spirits, and a monster description of demons, lesser gods, and children of demons and lesser gods with mortals (called Nephilim).
    GM of Ancient Battles: A homebrew warfare game based on Testament

    Kudur - The Bronze Age: A campaign setting using "D20 Fantasy" rules.

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    The Ancient Battlefield
    The Basics
    Ancient army battles are much more spectacular than the battles of the real world, and much more heroic; those who sneer at the idea of one man slaying hundreds of men in a single fight may be taken aback at the textual accounts.

    The Ancient Battlefield Resolution System is meant to simulate these epic combats, combats in which a single hero doesn’t just make a difference, he can win the whole thing. These are very abstract rules designed to let PCs slaughter large quantities of enemies and engage in personal battles against the most powerful enemy champions.

    These mass combat rules assume that there are two opposing armies on the field, and that, while the course of the battle may ebb and flow, the relative positions of the armies remains stable until one army or the other breaks morale. Thus there’s only a rudimentary movement system for the armies in these rules.

    All armies are composed of two Wings (Left and Right), and a Center. Each Wing and the Center is called a Side - there are three sides in each army. Some armies will also include a fourth Side held in reserve in case one of the other Sides is driven from the battlefield. The Sides can represent different elements within an army (archers, chariots, heavy infantry) or even the forces of different nations, joined together in an alliance against a common enemy.

    There are also individuals (including the PCs) in the battle who are attached to the Sides and called Captains. In every round, each Side and each Captain gets an action. These actions may inflict damage to a Side. Under certain conditions, a Side must make a Morale check, and if it’s failed, the Side breaks and flees. The battle ends when any two Sides of one army leave the field without being replaced.

    In order to allow individual heroes (including the player characters) to play as strong a role as the hundreds of normal soldiers on the battlefield, the armies are assigned stats that are similar to those of characters, and that (depending on the scale of the conflict) make an adventurer the equal of a company or an entire army.

    Time and Initiative
    Rounds in mass combat are called battlefield rounds. They have no set duration, but for the purposes of determining the duration of spells one battlefield round equals 20 minutes. At the beginning of the round, each Captain rolls initiative. On each initiative count, a Captain can go through a number of options, and the normal troops in the Side can attack on the initiative count of their commander.

    How Fighting Works
    At the start of the battle, the armies are lined up to face each other: the Left Wing, Center, and Right Wing of one army directly opposite the Right Wing, Center, and Left Wing of the other. On the initiative count of its commander, a Side can make an attack against the directly opposing Side. If there is no opposing Side, the attacker may make an attack on an adjacent opposing Side. The attacking Side’s attack roll is compared to the defender’s Armor Class; if the attack hits, it inflicts damage. The attack roll is also compared to the battlefield Armor Class of any Captains attached to the defending Side; if the attack hits them, the characters also take damage. With differing Armor Classes and circumstances, an attack could conceivably devastate the rank-and-file troops of a Side while leaving its Captains unscathed, or it could injure Captains (including PCs) without harming the troops.

    During a battle, a Side may have to make a Morale check against a DC of 13. A Side must make a Morale check under a number of circumstances, including when:

    • it’s exposed to spells (see Spell Effects, p. 58)
    • all its Captains have been eliminated
    • 50% of its original hit points have been lost
    • 75% of its original hit points have been lost

    When a Morale check is failed, the Side flees; player characters attached as Captains have the choice of fleeing with the Side or attaching themselves to another Side (see Changing Position/Withdrawing From Battle). When two Sides have fled without being replaced by reserves or new Sides created through use of the Split Forces feat, that army loses the battle.

    Terrain
    As (for the most part) armies don’t move about in the Ancient Battlefield Resolution System, terrain effects are not a major feature of the rules. It can be assumed that most battles are conducted on relatively level and clear land that provides little advantage or disadvantage to either side.

    If a battle is fought on broken, rocky hillsides, in mountains, or in forests, Mounted Sides lose their mobility advantage and must remain in place during the battle. In those terrains, Sides with heavy armor suffer a -2 penalty to attack rolls and AC. Both Mounted and heavily armored Sides suffer a -1 Morale penalty in hills, mountains, or forests.

    Pursuit
    If a Side fails its Morale check and leaves the battlefield, the Side directly opposing it can opt to pursue it, suffering an attack of opportunity from any adjacent enemy Sides, but then making an attack on the routed Side with a +4 attack bonus. The routed Side can only stop its flight and counterattack the pursuing Side if it can succeed at a Morale check, suffering a penalty equal to the base damage of the pursuers’ attack (before application of the Damage Multiplier) if the attack was successful.

    A Mounted Side cannot pursue a routing Side into hills, mountains, or forest.


    Troop Sides
    Each Side has the following statistics:
    • Troop Quality
    • Hit Points
    • Armor Class
    • Initiative Modifier
    • Base Attack Bonus
    • Base Damage
    • Damage Multiplier
    • Base Morale
    • Battlefield Feats
    A Side may also have PCs and NPCs attached to it called Captains.

    Troop Stats
    {table=head]Quality|Hit Point Multiplier|Base Attack Bonus|Base Morale| Damage Multiplier|Feats

    Green|
    x1
    |
    +0
    |
    -3
    |
    x2
    |
    2

    Trained|
    x2
    |
    +2
    |
    +0
    |
    x3
    |
    4

    Veteran|
    x5
    |
    +5
    |
    +3
    |
    x4
    |
    6

    Legendary|
    x8
    |
    +8
    |
    +6
    |
    x5
    |
    8
    [/table]

    Troop Quality
    There are four troop qualities: Green, Trained, Veteran, and Legendary. The GM picks a quality for each Side, although a player can take Battlefield feats to increase the quality of some or all of his Sides (see Feats).

    Green units are comprised of untrained and untested troops, or troops from a society where military combat is rare. The baseline Green unit is composed of 1st-level warriors.
    Trained units are a mix of green and seasoned troops, or average troops from a society where war is commonplace (i.e., all but the most decadent of Bronze Age societies). The baseline Trained unit is composed of 2nd-level warriors.
    Veteran units are made up of troops who have fought together for several campaigns, and have few (if any) green troops to hinder them. The baseline Veteran unit is composed of 5th-level warriors.
    Legendary troops are warriors of heroic bent who work well together and who have extensive military experience fighting together. Examples include the Persian Immortals and David’s Mighty Men. The baseline Legendary unit is composed of 8th level warriors.

    Of course, hardly any fighting force is made up of troops with uniform experience levels. An army can have different quality units for each of its Sides; King David’s army, for instance, consisted of Green tribal levies, Veteran mercenaries, and a Legendary royal guard.

    Hit Points
    The term “hit point” is used to denote the size of a Side. The correlation between hit points and the number of figures on each Side varies. The three scales of man-to-Side composition used in Testament are:

    Realistic: 1 hit point = 1 person
    Heroic: 1 hit points = 50 people
    Mythic: 1 hit point = 1,000 people

    A Realistic ratio provides a much stronger army and a more believable result.
    A Heroic ratio allows PC-level characters to dominate the battlefield.
    A Mythic ratio produces casualty figures with no correlation to reality.

    Once the scale is established, determine the number of combatants, and then multiply it by the Side’s army quality Hit Point Modifier; for example, a Heroic scale 1,000-man Veteran Side would have (1,000 ÷ 50 x 5) 100 hit points.

    After a battle is over, the number of hit points of damage suffered by each of the Sides of the defeated army can be multiplied by the hp-to-man ratio to determine how many dead bodies are left lying on the field, and thus how much treasure the victors can carry home with them (assuming their god allows them to take booty from slain opponents).

    Armor Class
    Armor class for a side on the battlefield is determined by armor type worn, natural toughness, and magical deflection bonuses. Because of the nature of mass battles, individuals aren’t in a position to use their Dexterity to protect themselves, so they receive no Dex modifiers to AC.

    Initiative Modifier
    Initiative modifiers are equal to the best Charisma modifier among the Captains (including PCs) attached to the Side. A Side wearing light or no armor receives a +1 initiative bonus; one wearing heavy armor receives a -1 initiative penalty.

    Base Attack Bonus
    The Base Attack Bonus is the bonus on the Side’s attack roll, based on troop quality.

    Base Damage
    This is the Side’s damage roll for its usual attack. Typically, it’s the damage done by the weapon used by the majority of the Side, plus any bonuses for battlefield feats.
    Damage is first applied to all Captains who were hit on the enemy Side; then it is multiplied by the Damage Multiplier and applied to the hit points of the troops on the enemy Side.

    Battlefield Icons
    The morale of an army or Side can be increased by the display of holy artifacts on the battlefield. A personal idol has no affect, but the primary portable idol of a city (the sort that is paraded through the streets on a sacred barque during festivals) raises the morale of an army to whom the object is sacred by +1, and of the Side it’s attached to by an additional +1, for as long as the troops are able to see it. If a battlefield icon is captured by the enemy, the morale of all troops of the losing army or Side is reduced by twice the icon’s morale bonus.

    Damage Multiplier
    On a successful attack, after the base damage is applied to the Captains, that same number is multiplied by the Damage Multiplier and is then applied to the hit point total of the Side.

    Base Morale
    If a Side has to make a Morale check, it has a base morale that depends on its troop quality. This is modified by the Charisma modifier of the commanding Captain. A Side wearing light or no armor receives a -1 Morale penalty; one wearing heavy armor receives a +1 Morale bonus.

    Battlefield Feats
    Every Side can choose a number of battlefield feats representing special abilities, training, tricks, and traits. Each Green Side can have two battlefield feats. Trained Sides have four feats. Veteran Sides have six, while Legendary Sides have eight battlefield feats.

    Characters Attached to Units
    In addition to regular troops, every Side may have player characters and NPCs attached to it. Once these Captains are attached to a Side, they may not move, except when the Side splits or moves as a whole.


    Battlefield Actions
    Fighting on a battlefield is very different than fighting in a one-on-one engagement, and Armor Class is adjusted accordingly. Characters do not receive Dexterity bonuses unless they have the Battlefield Seasoned feat or the Uncanny Dodge ability. Otherwise, they act as characters normally do.

    Each round, every Captain attached to a Side gets to choose a single battlefield action. The actions available are:

    • Attack an enemy Side
    • Cast a spell or use a magic item
    • Use a skill
    • Command the Side
    • Change position or withdraw from battle (Captain)
    • Withdraw from/enter battle (Side)
    • Challenge an enemy Captain

    Note that a Side held in reserve cannot participate in the battle. If it has the Combat Healing feat, it can use that feat as its action in a round, but the only other action it can opt to take is to enter the battle line, replacing a withdrawn or routed Side.

    Battlefield Attacks
    A character on the battlefield gets to make the same number of attacks per battlefield round as he would in a round of normal combat. He must attack the directly opposing Side unless it’s been destroyed or he’s attacking with a Side that’s using the Coordinated Attack feat. Character attacks on troops are conducted as normal, but successful attacks inflict one-tenth their damage to the enemy Side, rounding fractions up; e.g., an attack that would do 17 points on human scale does 2 points to a Side. The Master of the Field feat and the Battlefield Scourge mythic feat allow a character to increase the damage done.

    Casting Spells
    Battlefield use of spells is tricky to adjudicate. The following general guidelines should be changed as the situation warrants. Spells cast directly against Captains should be adjudicated through Captain vs. Captain combat (see Challenging an Enemy Captain).

    Because of the constraining conditions on the battlefield, a spellcaster is able to cast the same number of spells in a battlefield round as he would in a round of normal combat. A spellcaster must make a Concentration check (DC 15 + spell level + any damage sustained) to successfully cast his spell, unless he has the Battlefield Magic character feat. Supernatural abilities don’t require a Concentration check to be employed, but they follow all other rules of battlefield spellcasting.

    Spellcasting at a Side whose members have Spell Resistance requires the appropriate Resistance check be made. If only Captains have Spell Resistance, their checks are rolled individually. If a spell allows a saving throw, a single roll is made for the entire Side using the save bonus appropriate for a warrior of the Side’s troop quality; Captains (including player characters) roll their own saves as per normal.

    Spell Effects
    In general, non-damaging spells that have less than a 20-minute duration or that have less than a 20-ft. radius have no appreciable effect on the battlefield. The table below shows exceptions to that rule and the specifics of some spells. Other effects can be extrapolated from these: soften earth and stone (or even a heavy rain) has effects similar to slow, fog cloud can duplicate invisibility.

    Using Skills
    Skill use in the middle of battle incurs a -2 circumstance penalty. The Battlefield Seasoned character feat negates this penalty.

    Commanding The Side
    Unless the troops have the Operate Independently battlefield feat, they need guidance. Only one Captain may act as commander of each Side, forgoing all other combat options to give commands, such as choosing between targets if the Side has a targeting option or ordering the use of a battlefield maneuver to be carried out that round. The Side uses that commander’s Charisma modifier for Morale and initiative rolls.

    Changing Position/Withdrawing From Battle (Captain)
    If a Captain wishes to detach himself from one Side and attach himself to an adjacent one, or withdraw from the battle entirely, he must make a Reflex save (DC 13). If successful, he may move to the new Side or leave the battlefield without incident. If the save is failed, the Captain provokes an attack of opportunity (against him, not his Side) from the opposing Side before he can make his move. These same rules apply if a PC attached to a Side that fails a Morale check wants to attach himself to an adjacent Side instead of fleeing with the routed Side.

    Spell Effects
    {table=head]Spell Type|Effect

    “Mass” spell |affects entire Side as written

    Death spell/power word kill | 2 points damage/caster level

    Instantaneous damage spell (e.g., fireball)|1/10 damage to a Side

    Charm effect, 20 ft.+ radius |Morale check or Damage Multiplier reduced by -x1

    Courage effect, 20 ft.+ radius |bonus on all Morale checks

    Curse effect, 20 ft.+ radius |penalty to Armor Class

    Deafen effect, 20 ft.+ radius |Morale check or negate maneuver

    Enervation/Poison effect, 20 ft.+ radius |penalty to damage roll

    Entangle/Paralyzation effect, 20 ft.+ radius |Morale check or penalty to attack bonus

    Fear effect, 20 ft.+ radius |Morale check or rout

    Flight |+2 Armor Class bonus to target vs. ground-based opponents

    Haste |+2 to Side’s initiative checks

    Illusion effect, 20 ft.+ radius|

    Demoralizing illusion (e.g., show many people dying)
    | Morale check or rout

    Reposition Illusion (e.g., enemy is somewhere they’re not)
    |penalty to attack bonus

    Summon illusory opponent
    |Morale check or lose next attack

    Invisibility| +2 Armor Class bonus

    Invisibility, 20 ft.+ radius |bonus to Side Armor Class, bonus to base damage

    Silence, 20 ft.+ radius |Morale check or negate maneuver

    Sleep effect, 20 ft.+ radius |Morale check or penalty to attack bonus

    Slow, 20 ft.+ radius |-2 to a Side’s initiative checks

    Stun effects, 20 ft.+ radius |Morale check or lose next attack

    Wall of force/iron/etc.|

    positioned to isolate a commander
    | Reflex save or Captain is isolated until barrier is gone

    positioned to block charge, missile hurling
    | negate maneuver

    positioned as a general barrier
    |penalty to Side’s attack bonus[/table]

    {table=head]Spell Type|Morale Check Penalties

    Spell is 1st-2nd level|-0 to enemy Morale check

    Spell is 3rd-4th level|-2 to enemy Morale check

    Spell is 5th-6th level|-4 to enemy Morale check

    Spell is 7th-8th level|-6 to enemy Morale check

    Spell is 9th+ level|-8 to enemy Morale check

    Power word|-1 additional Morale[/table]

    Bonus/Penalty: If a spell gives a bonus or penalty to one or more of a Side’s statistics, a 1st-2nd-level spell gives a +/-1 bonus/penalty, 3rd-4th-level spells give +/-2, 5th-6th level spells give +/-3, 7th-8th-level spells give +/-4, and 9th (or higher) level spells give +/-5.

    If the effect comes from a supernatural or spell-like ability that doesn’t have an equivalent spell, divide the caster’s Hit Dice by 2 to get the equivalent spell level.

    If a spell affects multiple statistics, the bonus or penalty is split between the statistics; e.g., a 9th-level spell could adjust five statistics by +/-1 each, or one by +/-5.

    Negate Maneuver: This means that no battlefield maneuver may be deployed that round.

    Withdrawing From Battle/Entering Battle (Side)
    A Captain can order his Side to leave the battlefield at any time. Doing so always entails an attack of opportunity from the directly opposing Side followed by a Morale check (unless the withdrawing Side is Mounted). If the attack of opportunity is successful, the Morale check suffers a penalty equal to the base damage of the attack (before application of the Damage Multiplier). If the Morale check is successful, the Side has retired in good order and can reform itself as a reserve force if it so desires; if the check is failed, the Side routs and cannot be reformed.

    A Captain commanding a reserve Side can decide to deploy his troops if there is an open position (Left or Right Wing, or Center) in the line of battle. A Side attempting to march onto the battlefield after the battle has started provokes an attack of opportunity and must make a Morale check (unless the advancing Side is Mounted). If the attack of opportunity is successful, the Morale check suffers a penalty equal to the base damage of the attack (before application of the Damage Multiplier). If the Morale check is successful, the Side ignores the attack and moves into position; if the check is failed, the Side returns to the position it held before the attempt to join the battle.

    Challenging an Enemy Captain
    A Captain can challenge any single enemy Captain to single or small group combat, provided he’s on the opposing Side. This is resolved separately from the main combat, using normal d20 System rules. Because of the differing time scales between battlefield and normal combat, the entire challenge takes place in the space of one battlefield round. The two opponents begin combat 20-120 ft. (2d6x10) apart. At the beginning of the fight, multiple Captains may team up to challenge an enemy Captain (or Captains). If a Captain wishes to join a challenge already in progress, he must make a Reflex save (DC 18); if successful, he arrives 1d6 normal rounds later.

    A Captain may choose to flee the battle rather than accept the challenge. He must make a Reflex save (DC 10+ the highest challenger level) to blend in with his Side or otherwise avoid the challenger. A Captain may not take part in more than one combat in a battlefield turn.
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-03-02 at 06:35 PM.
    GM of Ancient Battles: A homebrew warfare game based on Testament

    Kudur - The Bronze Age: A campaign setting using "D20 Fantasy" rules.

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    Battlefield Feats
    Battlefield feats are divided into Qualities, Maneuvers, and Specials.

    Qualities affect a Side at all times. To perform a Maneuver, the Side must have a Captain who spends his entire battlefield action directing them or it must have the Operate Independently battlefield feat. If no Captain is present, the Side cannot employ any of its Maneuvers. A Side can only perform one Maneuver in a round. Consult individual entries for details on each Special feat.

    A Leader Shall Emerge (Quality)
    Your Side always has fresh leadership blood.

    Benefit: If all its Captains are slain and the Side survives its Morale check, a new Captain emerges from the host to command it on the next round. For a Green Side, this Captain is a 1st-level fighter; for a Trained Side, this Captain is a 2nd-level fighter; for a Veteran Side, this Captain is a 5th-level fighter; and for a Legendary side, he is an 8th-level fighter.

    Battlefield Dominance (Quality)
    Your Side can exploit the weakness of those that are not as good as you.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: The Side gains a +2 bonus on attack and damage rolls (not Damage Multiplier) on all attacks against units with a lower quality rating; i.e., a Legendary Side gains this bonus against Green, Trained, and Veteran sides, while a Veteran Side gains this against Green and Trained Sides.

    Battlefield Toughness (Quality)
    Your Side is hardier on the battlefield than most units.

    Benefit: The Side has 10% more hit points that it normally should have based on quality and size. When the Side suffers damage, the number of soldiers actually slain is proportional to the unit’s original hit points; e.g., a unit with one level of Battlefield Toughness that suffers 22 points of damage loses that many hit points from its total, but only 20 hit points worth of troops (see Hit Points, above, for the scales of man-to-Side composition) actually die.

    This feat can be bought multiple times.

    Charge (Maneuver)
    Your Side opens battle with an initial charge that has impressive results.

    Benefit: On the first attack roll of a battle, the Side can Charge. It receives a -2 Armor Class penalty, but gets a +2 bonus on its attack roll and base damage, and if it successfully hits, the opposing Side must make a Morale check (DC 13) or lose its next 1d3 attacks; multiple attacks as a result of a Skirmish or a Coordinated Attack battlefield feat are considered a single attack for this purpose.

    Note: The Side does not have to be Mounted to perform this Maneuver.

    Combat Discipline (Quality)
    Your Side wields its weapon with deadly skill.
    Prerequisite: Veteran, Combat Focus

    Benefit: The Side adds +1 to all Morale rolls, and +1 to all damage rolls.

    Combat Focus (Quality)
    Your Side is highly capable in combat.

    Benefit: The Side adds +1 to all attack rolls.

    Combat Healing (Quality)
    Your Side has healers available to assist wounded Captains and soldiers.

    Benefit: The Side has sufficient healing magic to cure 1d8+1 hit points of damage done to a single Captain, as well as 1d8+1 hit points of damage done to normal troops each round.

    Coordinated Attack (Maneuver)
    Your Side can attack two or more Sides at once.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: The Side can launch a second attack against an adjacent Side with a -4 penalty to the attack roll after a successful attack against a directly opposing Side. If it is in the Center of the battle line, it can launch a third attack against the remaining adjacent Side (with a -8 penalty to the attack roll) if its second attack is successful.

    This feat also allows a Captain to challenge a Captain in an adjacent Side instead of a directly opposing Side.

    Coordinated Defense (Quality)
    Your Side can resist attempts to find its weak spots.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: The Side is impervious to the secondary attacks of Skirmish and Coordinated Attack maneuvers.

    Dedicated Defenders (Quality)
    Your Side fights better when defending the homes of its troops.

    Benefit: Only when fighting on home territory (within a day’s walk of their homes, including the encampment of nomads, not just within the confines of their nation), the Side with this feat gains +2 to attack rolls, damage rolls, and Morale checks, and increases its Damage Multiplier by x1.

    Excellent Flankers (Quality)
    Your Side knows how to outflank your opponents.

    Benefit: If the Side with this feat is able to attack an adjacent Side (either because it has routed the directly opposing Side or because it’s performing the Coordinated Attack maneuver), it gets a +2 attack and damage bonus.

    Ferocious Attack (Maneuver)
    By sacrificing safety your Side can cause more enemy casualties.

    Benefit: A Side can use Ferocious Attack to increase its damage against a particular Side. For every point by which the Side decreases its Armor Class for the next round, it increases its base damage by +1 on its next attack (to a maximum of -5 AC/+5 damage).

    Fight Cautiously (Maneuver)
    Through caution, your Side becomes harder to hurt in battle.

    Benefit: A Side can use Fight Cautiously to increase its protection against a particular Side. For every point by which the Side decreases its base damage on its next attack, it increases its Armor Class by +1 for the current round (to a maximum of -5 damage/+5 AC).

    Heroic Stand (Special)
    When badly outnumbered, your Side becomes the stuff from which legends will be made.
    Prerequisite: Legendary

    Benefit: When an opposing Side has more than triple the hit points of the Side with this feat, the defending Side digs in and gets very determined. The Side gets a +4 Armor Class, attack, and Morale bonus that lasts for one battlefield round per point of the Charisma bonus of its commanding Captain at the start of the stand. If the Captain is slain, the stand is not interrupted.

    The Heroic Stand may be activated as a free action. Its bonuses are cumulative with other maneuvers.

    Hurl Your Missiles (Maneuver)
    Your Side starts combat by throwing spears or firing arrows or sling stones into the enemy host.

    Benefit: The Side gains an extra attack with a +2 bonus on attack and damage on the first round that it engages with the enemy. Each time the Side leaves the battle and then returns later from a reserve position, it is able to make another extra attack.

    A Side armed only with ranged weapons has its Damage Multiplier reduced to x1 for all attacks except the extra attacks gained from this feat.

    Kill the Head of the Snake (Quality)
    Your Side knows how to target enemy leaders and champions.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: The Side may choose to target the Captains of an opposing Side. The Side receives a +4 bonus on its attack and damage rolls against enemy Captains, but its attack does not carry over to the normal troops on the Side.

    Left-Handed (Quality)
    All members of your Side are either left-handed or ambidextrous, naturally or by way of special training.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: In normal combat, being left-handed has no special benefits. But in mass combat, most troops are trained to face right-handed soldiers, and a unit with its weapons and shields in the “wrong” hands has a slight tactical advantage. A Side that is Left-Handed has a +1 bonus on attack rolls and to Armor Class when facing a normal Side. Such a specialized unit can be assembled by selecting those soldiers who are naturally left-handed or ambidextrous, or by taking right-handed troops and giving them intensive training with left-handed weapon use while their right hands are tied to their sides, as was done by the Israelite tribe of Benjamin.

    Loose Formation (Special)
    Your Side is able to minimize damage from enemy spells and missile weapons.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: This Side can change its formation to become less closely packed, thereby minimizing the effects of spells and missile attacks. The Side suffers only half damage from spell effects and has a +2 bonus on Morale checks vs. spells. It also gains a +2 bonus to AC against ranged weapons. All attacks made by the Side suffer a penalty of -1 to its Damage Multiplier (to a minimum of x1).

    Once a Side has assumed a Loose Formation, it maintains that formation in succeeding rounds as a Quality; returning to regular formation requires the use of a battlefield action.

    Might of Many (Quality)
    Your Side is stronger than average.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: Either through improvement over time, deliberate selection of the strongest of recruits, or the death of the weakest in battle, this Side has a higher average Strength than most units. The average Strength of most Sides is 10, but every time this feat is taken the Side’s Strength improves by +2, resulting in bonuses to melee attack and damage rolls. If the Side has the Hurl Your Missiles feat and uses thrown weapons, it also receives Strength bonuses on missile damage.

    This feat can be taken multiple times.

    Morale Boost (Maneuver)
    Your commander knows how to inspire his Side to high morale.

    Benefit: The Side gets a +2 bonus on Morale checks.

    Mounted (Quality)
    Your Side is mounted, on horses, mules, donkeys, camels, or chariots.

    Benefit: This Side has greater mobility on the battlefield, and is able to move into a new position in the battle array; e.g., a Mounted Wing can move to become a Center, or a Left Wing can move to take a Right Wing position. When the Mounted Side moves, all other Sides in the army are repositioned accordingly; if a Mounted Side moves from a position on the Left to one on the extreme Right, the former Center becomes the new Left, while the former Right Wing becomes the new Center.

    If the Side also has the Split Forces feat, the new Sides can be positioned anywhere in the battle array. Moving a Mounted Side into a new position normally takes an entire battlefield round, preventing it from attacking in the round. If the Side also has the Skirmish or Coordinated Attack feat, it can make its secondary attack (at an additional -4 penalty to the attack roll) in the same round as it moves. A Mounted Side can enter battle or withdraw from the front lines without provoking an attack of opportunity or a Morale check.

    Note: While some units would remain on their mounts in combat (e.g., camel-riding archers, or those in chariots), many ancient infantry units would use mounts merely to get into position on the battlefield quickly, and then would dismount to fight on foot.

    Operate Independently (Quality)
    Your Side doesn’t need a Captain.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: A Side with this Operate Independently can perform a battlefield feat (feat selected by the GM) without a Captain present, and does not need to make a Morale check when all of its Captains are killed.

    Protect the Leader (Quality)
    Your Side knows how to protect its commanders.
    Prerequisite: Trained, Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: Captains attached to the unit (including PCs) receive a bonus to Armor Class; Trained Sides give a +2, Veteran Sides a +4, Legendary +6.

    Send for Reinforcements (Maneuver)
    Your Side receives help during the course of the battle.

    Benefit: A Side that receives reinforcements increases its hit points. A Green Side gains 1 hit point, a Trained Side gains 3, a Veteran Side 6, and a Legendary 9. This battlefield feat should be mitigated by the strategic situation: If all roads have been cut off and the army is far from its home base, this battlefield feat shouldn’t be usable.

    Set vs. Charge (Maneuver)
    When an opponent charges, your Side is ready for them.

    Benefit: This Side gets a free attack against charging opponents, with
    a +2 attack bonus (in addition to the -2 AC penalty suffered by the
    charging attackers).

    Shield Bearers (Quality)
    The warriors in your Side are protected by assistants whose only duty is to employ oversized shields in your defense.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: The Side has additional troops equipped with tower shields who are paired with the ordinary troops to provide a +4 Armor Class bonus to the Side. If the warriors of the Side have their own personal shields, the two AC bonuses are cumulative. The shield bearers have insignificant personal arms.

    Skirmish (Maneuver)
    Your Side is light and maneuverable and gets an extra attack.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: If the Side is equipped with no or light armor, small or no shields, and small or medium-sized weapons, it can make an extra attack in the round with a -4 penalty on its attack rolls.

    Shout Defiantly (Special)
    Your Side can shake the enemy with a great shout.
    Prerequisite: Legendary

    Benefit: Once per battle, the Side can shout in unison, forcing the opposing Side to make a Morale check (DC 13) or flee the battle. This is done as a free action.

    Split Forces (Special)
    Your Side can protect an adjacent Side.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: When one of the adjacent Sides has collapsed, the Side can split into two Sides to reinforce the breach. Each resulting Side is identical to the original except that its hit points are split evenly between the two. Captains are divided between the two Sides at the will of the commander.

    This is not a simple activity. Splitting a Side requires a battlefield round, preventing the Side from attacking in the round unless it also has the Skirmish or Coordinated Attack feat, in which case it can make its secondary attack (at an additional -4 penalty to the attack roll) in the same round as it splits.

    Trample (Manuever)
    Your side is able to run over the enemy with their mounts as well as attack with their personal weapons.
    Prerequisites: Charge, Mounted

    Benefit: This Side is able to use their mounts to deal damage to their opposing side. If they attempted a Charge maneuver on their first attack roll, and succeeded in hitting either the opposing Side or any of its captains, the Side rolls an additional d4 for every whole multiple that the trampling Side exceeds their opposing side, rounding up, and adds this to the damage from the charge attack. For instance, a trampling Side with 12,500 troops would roll 3d4 against a side with 5,000 troops (12,500/5,000 = 2.5, rounded up to 3). This damage is then multiplied by the damage multiplier as normal.

    Two Weapon Ready (Quality)
    Your Side is able to attack at long and close range.
    Prerequisite: Hurl Your Missiles

    Benefit: This Side is equipped with both ranged and melee weapons. After making its extra attack using ranged weapons (see Hurl Your Missiles, above), the Side switches to its melee weapon, thereby avoiding the reduction in Damage Multiplier.

    Unshakable (Quality)
    Your Side stands firm in the face of adversity.
    Prerequisite: Veteran or Legendary

    Benefit: In a circumstance where the Side must make a Morale check, it is allowed to make two checks, and uses the better of the two rolls.

    Weapons of Renown (Quality)
    Your Side’s weapons are better than average.
    Prerequisite: Trained, Veteran, or Legendary

    Benefit: The Side has higher quality weapons than most. This can mean masterwork or magic weapons, iron weapons when facing bronze armored opponents, or mighty bows (in the hands of a Side that also has the Might of Many battlefield feat). The bonuses to attack and damage rolls depend on the specifics of the Side’s special weapons.


    Common Army Battlefield Feat Combinations
    Battlefield feats can be used in combination to build particular unit types. Charioteers are likely to have mobility and shock-related battlefield feats; archers have skirmish-related feats and ones less related to defense and morale, etc. The following examples illustrate how to simulate a number of unit compositions.

    Egyptian Charioteers
    Green: Hurl Your Missiles, Mounted
    Trained: Excellent Flankers, Hurl Your Missiles, Mounted, Skirmish
    Veteran: Coordinated Attack, Excellent Flankers, Hurl Your Missiles, Mounted, Protect the Leader, Split Forces
    Legendary: Coordinated Attack, Excellent Flankers, Hurl Your Missiles, Mounted, Operate Independently, Protect the Leader, Split Forces, Unshakable

    Philistine Giant Footmen
    Green: Charge, Ferocious Attack
    Trained: Battlefield Toughness, Charge, Ferocious Attack, Might of Many (Str 12)
    Veteran: Battlefield Toughness, Charge, Coordinated Defense, Ferocious Attack, Might of Many 2 (Str 14)
    Legendary: Battlefield Dominance, Battlefield Toughness, Charge, Coordinated Defense, Ferocious Attack, Might of Many 3 (Str 16)

    Assyrian Archers
    Green: Hurl Your Missiles, Two Weapon Ready
    Trained: Combat Discipline, Excellent Flankers, Hurl Your Missiles, Two Weapon Ready
    Veteran: Combat Discipline, Excellent Flankers, Hurl Your Missiles, Loose Formation, Skirmish, Two Weapon Ready
    Legendary: Combat Focus, Combat Discipline, Excellent Flankers, Hurl Your Missiles, Kill the Head of the Snake, Loose Formation, Skirmish, Two Weapon Ready

    Green Warriors
    Here are the stats for a Side composed of 100/5,000/100,000 (depending on scale) Green warriors, unarmored, equipped with sling and dagger, commanded by a Captain with Charisma 12.
    Quality: Green
    Hit Points: 100 (100 x1 Green quality)
    Armor Class: 10
    Initiative Modifier: +2 (Captain +1 Charisma modifier, +1 light armor)
    Base Attack Bonus: +0
    Base Damage: 1d4 (sling or dagger)
    Damage Multiplier: x2 (Green quality)
    Morale Modifier: -3 (-3 Green quality, Captain +1 Charisma modifier, -1 light armor)
    Battlefield Feats: 2

    Trained Warriors
    Here are the stats for a Side composed of 100/5,000/100,000 (depending on scale) Trained warriors, equipped with khopesh and studded leather armor, commanded by a Captain with Charisma 14.
    Quality: Trained
    Hit Points: 200 (100 x2 Trained quality)
    Armor Class: 13 (+3 studded leather)
    Initiative Modifier: +3 (Captain +2 Charisma modifier, +1 light armor)
    Base Attack Bonus: +2
    Base Damage: 1d6 (khopesh)
    Damage Multiplier: x3 (Trained quality)
    Morale Modifier: +1 (+0 Trained quality, Captain +2 Charisma modifier, -1 light armor)
    Battlefield Feats: 4

    Veteran Warriors
    Here are the stats for a Side composed of 100/5,000/100,000 (depending on scale) Veterans equipped with longsword, scale mail and small shields, commanded by a Captain with Charisma 16.
    Quality: Veteran
    Hit Points: 500 (100 x5 Veteran quality)
    Armor Class: 15 (+4 scale mail, +1 small shield)
    Initiative Modifier: +3 (Captain +3 Charisma modifier)
    Base Attack Bonus: +5
    Base Damage: 1d8 (longsword)
    Damage Multiplier: x4 (Veteran quality)
    Morale Modifier: +6 (+3 Veteran quality, Captain +3 Charisma modifier)
    Battlefield Feats: 6

    Legendary Warriors
    Here are the stats for a Side composed of 100/5,000/100,000 (depending on scale) Legendary warriors, armed with longsword and studded leather, equipped with breast plate and large shields, commanded by a Captain with Charisma 18.
    Quality: Legendary
    Hit Points: 800 (100 x8 Legendary quality)
    Armor Class: 17 (+5 breast plate, +2 large shield)
    Initiative Modifier: +3 (Captain +4 Charisma modifier, -1 heavy
    armor)
    Base Attack Bonus: +8
    Base Damage: 1d8 (longsword)
    Damage Multiplier: x5 (Legendary quality)
    Morale Modifier: +11 (+6 Legendary quality, Captain +4 Charisma
    modifier, +1 heavy armor)
    Battlefield Feats: 8
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-03-05 at 11:11 AM.
    GM of Ancient Battles: A homebrew warfare game based on Testament

    Kudur - The Bronze Age: A campaign setting using "D20 Fantasy" rules.

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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    New Feats

    Battlefield Magic (Battlefield, Metamagic)
    Your battlefield experience makes spellcasting easier.
    Benefit: You can cast spells on a battlefield without needing to make a Concentration check.

    Battlefield Maneuver (Battlefield)
    Under your leadership, your comrades benefit from your abilities.
    Benefit: You select a battlefield feat at the time Battlefield Maneuver is taken. When you’re in command of a Side, that Side temporarily gains the use of this feat.
    Special: Battlefield Maneuver may be taken multiple times. Each time it is taken, a new battlefield feat must be chosen.

    Battlefield Seasoned (Battlefield)
    You are accustomed to fighting on the battlefield.
    Benefit: You do not suffer the -2 battlefield penalty on skill usage, and may add your Dexterity bonus to your Armor Class.

    Battlefield Spell (Battlefield, Metamagic)
    You cast magic on the battlefield with devastating effectiveness.
    Benefit: The damage your spells inflict on the battlefield is doubled. A Battlefield Spell uses up a spell slot one level higher than the spell’s actual level.

    Improved Rally (Battlefield, General)
    You are able to inspire those around you to feats of awesome courage and valor.
    Prerequisites: Charisma 12+, Rally
    Benefit: Your presence boosts morale as per the Rally feat, but the bonus enjoyed by those rallied is equal to your Charisma modifier. The bonus from Improved Rally applies to a single Side and is in addition to any bonuses the Side receives from its commanding Captain. While using this feat you lose all Dex bonuses to AC and cannot Dodge. Your attack and weapon damage rolls suffer a –2 penalty if you attempt to fight while maintaining your highly visible stance. You cannot use this feat and flee from a challenge in the same battlefield round.

    Master of the Field (Battlefield)
    You’re more effective in mass combat than most warriors.
    Prerequisite: +5 base attack bonus
    Benefit: You do one-quarter damage to a Side you attack on the battlefield.
    Normal: Characters without this feat do one-tenth damage to a Side in massed combat.

    Rally (Battlefield, General)
    Through force of personality, you are able to inspire courage in those around you.
    Prerequisite: Charisma 12+
    Benefit: By presenting yourself in a prominent location (such as on a hill, or beneath a battle banner) during pitched combat your mere presence boosts the morale of those who are in a position to see you or hear your voice, granting them a +1 morale bonus on attack rolls, weapon damage, and saves against charm and fear effects. This bonus only applies to those who have an emotional commitment to you or a cause you represent. A person can only benefit from the effects of one Rally at a time. The bonus from Rally applies to a single Side and is in addition to any bonuses the Side receives from its commanding Captain. While using this feat you lose all Dex bonuses to AC and cannot Dodge. Your attack and weapon damage rolls suffer a –2 penalty if you attempt to fight while maintaining your highly visible stance. You cannot use this feat and flee from a challenge in the same battlefield round.
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-03-03 at 12:12 PM.
    GM of Ancient Battles: A homebrew warfare game based on Testament

    Kudur - The Bronze Age: A campaign setting using "D20 Fantasy" rules.

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    Halfling in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Addtional Resources:

    Craft Points Variant
    Ancient Battles: an example of the Battlefield Resolution System in work, with real people

    (more to come)
    Last edited by Raveler1; 2007-04-04 at 06:46 PM.
    GM of Ancient Battles: A homebrew warfare game based on Testament

    Kudur - The Bronze Age: A campaign setting using "D20 Fantasy" rules.

  26. - Top - End - #26
    Titan in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    I just wanted to pass on some words of encouragement for this. I haven't had the time to fully read through and review this, but I have it bookmarked and will get round to it.
    It is a joyful thing indeed to hold intimate converse with a man after one’s own heart, chatting without reserve about things of interest or the fleeting topics of the world; but such, alas, are few and far between.

    – Yoshida Kenko (1283-1350), Tsurezure-Gusa (1340)

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    Halfling in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: [Campaign Setting] Kudur - Bronze Age

    Thanks! It's great to know that I'm not just posting this for my own benefit... though that is a side benefit, I suppose... :-)
    GM of Ancient Battles: A homebrew warfare game based on Testament

    Kudur - The Bronze Age: A campaign setting using "D20 Fantasy" rules.

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