Support the GITP forums on Patreon
Help support GITP's forums (and ongoing server maintenance) via Patreon
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 42
  1. - Top - End - #1
    Halfling in the Playground
     
    RedKnightGirl

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Israel
    Gender
    Female

    Question Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    I'm starting a new campaign for my D&D group soon (3.5e FYI) and it's the first campaign I'm going to DM (though I've DMed a quest or two in the last campaign and in the one before that).
    Now my previous DMs didn't put much effort into making us role-play our characters, which is a shame. When my friend first explained D&D to me I thought it would really be cool to play it with in-game role-playing, but the opportunity never came. I was able to role-play my paladin a bit in my current campaign but not to the level I wanted.
    Now that I'm starting my own campaign I'm torn. On the one hand I would really like my players to role-play, I'm planing on giving quests related to their backstories and awarding good role-playing with a bit of XP. But on the other hand they never seem to be interested in the fluff of things, when I DMed a quest a few months back they told me to skip a fare bit of dialog between two major characters (a part of the conversation was supposed to be a plot hook for another part of the quest).
    Now, I know I would enjoy role-playing in any campaign and so does another member of the group (which happens to be my twin sister) but is it worth the effort? I don't think my players would enjoy my campaign as much if I shoved role-playing down their throats, any advice?
    Last edited by karinrin55; 2015-10-23 at 09:18 AM.
    "If ever in doubt, roll sense motive (Or knowledge)"- Me

    And also 78% of DM's started their first campaign in a tavern. If you're one of the 22% that didn't, copy and paste this into your signature.

    Too many background ideas, too little characters

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Troll in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

    Join Date
    Aug 2014

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    If the dialogue was between two "major characters" who were both NPCs, with the PCs just listening, that may have been the issue in that particular case. Even when trying to seriously roleplay instead of treating it like a boardgame, it's just not much fun sitting there listening to the DM talk to himself.
    Spoiler: Playground Quotes
    Show

    Quote Originally Posted by Safety Sword View Post
    JAL_1138: Founding Member of the Paranoid Adventurer's Guild.
    Quote Originally Posted by TeChameleon View Post
    - If it's something mortals were not meant to know, I've already found six different ways to blow myself and/or someone else up with it.
    Gnomish proverb


    I use blue text for silliness and/or sarcasm. Do not take anything I say in blue text seriously, except for this sentence and the one preceding it.

  3. - Top - End - #3
    Ettin in the Playground
    Join Date
    Feb 2012

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    @ OP: Well, if your players don't want to RP, then it's not worth it. That doesn't mean you can't tempt them a little now and again with some RP, but don't expect a lot of it. And I wouldn't force the issue.
    I know that can be frustrating. You may want to take it up with them, and find out where each stands. They may be willing to experiment a bit.
    Last edited by hymer; 2015-10-23 at 09:13 AM.
    My D&D 5th ed. Druid Handbook

  4. - Top - End - #4
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
    Kobold

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Earth... sort of.
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by karinrin55 View Post
    I'm starting a new campaign for my D&D group soon (3.5e FYI) and it's the first campaign I'm going to DM (though I've DMed a quest or two in the last campaign and in the one before that).
    Now my previous DMs didn't put much effort into making us role-play our characters, which is a shame. When my friend first explained D&D to me I thought it would really be cool to play it with in-game role-playing, but the opportunity never came. I was able to role-play my paladin a bit in my current campaign but not to the level I wanted.
    Now that I'm starting my own campaign I'm torn. On the one hand I would really like my players to role-play, I'm planing on giving quests related to their backstories and awarding good role-playing with a bit of XP. But on the other hand they never seem to be interested in the fluff of things, when I DMed a quest a few months back they told me to skip a fare bit of dialog between two major characters (a part of the conversation was supposed to be a plot hook for another part of the quest).
    Now, I know I would enjoy role-playing in any campaign and so does another member of the group (which happens to be my twin sister) but is it worth the effort? I don't think my players would enjoy my campaign as much if I shoved role-playing down their throats, ant advice?

    GOOD WAYS TO MAKE YOUR PARTY ROLEPLAY:

    -Talk to them before the game about how you'd like to do something a little more serious and in-character. Don't force them to, just say it's something you'd really like to do and generally they'll go along with trying something new for a friend.

    -Roleplay. If you speak in the first person, and some of the PCs do, then that'll create an atmosphere where the others might feel more comfortable with it.

    -Encourage them to have backstories for their characters, then work those backstories into the storyline. Even the most reclusive player will get into the spirit of things when his PC's puppy is held hostage!

    BAD WAYS

    -Make it mandatory or affect the game rules in some way. That's where the throat-shoving begins.


    Above all else, do whatever seems fun for you and for your group.


    EDIT: Oh yeah no I missed that one line. Never have two NPCs talk to each other for more than a line at a time. NPCs should always approach the party one at a time. Unless the party is specifically eavesdropping.
    Last edited by shadow_archmagi; 2015-10-23 at 09:15 AM.
    Avatar by K penguin. Sash by Damned1rishman.
    MOVIE NIGHTS AND LETS PLAYS LIVESTREAMED

  5. - Top - End - #5
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Imp

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Sweden
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    First off, dialog between NPCs =/= role-playing. Even if it's relevant to the plot and the NPCs are important. It's theater, not role play.

    What you want to encourage is that the players not only role play with the NPCs but also with each other. One crass but effective way to get this done is to disallow OOC discussions about IC topics between the players. If one player wants to tell another player something they must do it in character.

    It's very important that everyone gets a feel of what the other characters are like, race/class/alignment doesn't count (not even a little, sorry). So what you want for that is not character archetypes but character traits, things like greedy, happy, stingy, flaky. Adjectives, and tell them it's preferable to over-act than to try to be subtle. The best way I've found is to do this with NPCs, show them how it's done. And really sell the character, if a happy and sarcastic paladin NPC is talking to the players then overact, bring up the intensity to 11.
    In later sessions when they understand then you can be subtle about things.

    Of course, if they're not into it, then they're not into it and there's nothing you can do about that.
    Black text is for sarcasm, also sincerity. You'll just have to read between the lines and infer from context like an animal

  6. - Top - End - #6
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    RangerGuy

    Join Date
    Dec 2014

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    EXP incentives are pretty good. Provide opportunities and rewards for taking alternative actions in-game. Talk to your players about your expectations the game before it starts.

    Quote Originally Posted by shadow_archmagi View Post
    Never have two NPCs talk to each other for more than a line at a time.
    I noticed that it's not a problem in Play-by-Post, but that's because the NPC conversation doesn't eat up any more time than any other single-player (or single-GM) interaction.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastikator View Post
    One crass but effective way to get this done is to disallow OOC discussions about IC topics between the players. If one player wants to tell another player something they must do it in character.
    How does this help at all?..?!
    Last edited by goto124; 2015-10-23 at 09:49 AM.

  7. - Top - End - #7
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Imp

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Sweden
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by goto124 View Post
    How does this help at all?..?!
    They have to communicate, if it's only possible through role play then they'll do it that way. If not they'll fall back on just talking OOC.
    Black text is for sarcasm, also sincerity. You'll just have to read between the lines and infer from context like an animal

  8. - Top - End - #8
    Halfling in the Playground
     
    RedKnightGirl

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Israel
    Gender
    Female

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastikator View Post
    One crass but effective way to get this done is to disallow OOC discussions about IC topics between the players. If one player wants to tell another player something they must do it in character.
    The problem with this is that we have two new players in our group that still don't fully understand the game (I've been playing for about three years and I'm still not familiar with every rule there is so OOC talk can't be obsolete cause they still need a bit of help. But generally all your advice is really helpful, I'm meeting with the group tonight (not for D&D though) and I'll ask them if they wouldn't mind role=playing more intensely in my campaign.
    Plus I am working hard on dialing down NPC dialog with one another, I'm an amateur writer in addition to everything and I get so caught up with a story that I don't realize I've written half a page of dialog that won't interest the PCs at all.
    "If ever in doubt, roll sense motive (Or knowledge)"- Me

    And also 78% of DM's started their first campaign in a tavern. If you're one of the 22% that didn't, copy and paste this into your signature.

    Too many background ideas, too little characters

  9. - Top - End - #9
    Pixie in the Playground
     
    ElfWarriorGuy

    Join Date
    Mar 2015

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Talking 'In Character' is not the same thing as Role Playing.

    Talking as though you were someone else is Acting. Some people may not be comfortable with improv acting, and it may be difficult for them to get into that. I would not recommend you pressure them to do so.

    Role Playing, however, is about choosing how you think a character would act in a given circumstance. Making decisions for a character is the point of a Role Playing Game! In that sense, I think you could add a few leading questions in to all sorts of interactions to help get them to think about their characters' actions.

    Player: "We get rooms for the night."
    DM: "Do you briskly demand rooms without further conversation?"
    Player: "No, I ask politely for 3 rooms."
    OR
    Player: "Yeah, I toss down the money and say I want 3 rooms."

    I don't guarantee this will work for your players, but I have helped my players to think a bit more about how their character is acting with comparable tactics.

    As to what some of the others have said, having the players listen to more than a few sentences of conversation is likely not going to be fun for them. Try to compact the information you want to impart to them. Every moment spent listening to expositions is another moment spent not making decisions, and thus, not truly playing!

  10. - Top - End - #10
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Texas
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Talk to your players and make sure they want to roleplay and talk extensively in character. Some people do, some people don't. Neither is wrong, but the game will suffer if you and the players are not on the same page.

    I second the notion of less NPC/NPC chatter. I normally don't talk that out in character as the DM. Instead you can say something like "Joe the Wizard and the noble are having a conversation about the recent trade caravan that went missing. The noble is clearly getting heated" and then let the players do what they want. The character's are supposed to be the stars and main focus of the story. If you have a lot you want to say, have an NPC say it to the players directly. It will make the information matter and engage them in roleplaying.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastikator View Post
    What you want to encourage is that the players not only role play with the NPCs but also with each other.
    This is beyond important-it is the glue that holds groups together, in and out of character. This prevents situations where only some of the players are playing, and highlights the group nature of ttRPG's. Even if the group just wants to find a dungeon, kick in the door, kill everything that moves and loot everything of value, they should be doing it together and interact while doing so.
    Guides
    Monk dipping for pathfinder druids, a mini guide
    Trapped Under Ice-Geddy2112's guide to the Pathfinder Winter Witch
    I contributed to this awesome guide to chaotic good

  11. - Top - End - #11
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    RangerGuy

    Join Date
    Dec 2014

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by Lost in Hyrule View Post
    Player: "We get rooms for the night."
    DM: "Do you briskly demand rooms without further conversation?"
    To be honest, if the DM talked to me like that, I would feel as if xe were insulting my (character's) intelligence. "What, no, I ask politely, why did you think otherwise? Were you going to have the innkeeper refuse to let our characters have the rooms because we were apparently that socially challenged?"

    If it's something like "we get rooms for the night", the players probably want to quickly go past the relatively boring asking-for-rooms stuff and go straight to (preparing for) the next day of adventure. Roleplay has to be fun.

    Even before the game starts, the first question would be "hey guys, I've been thinking of introducing a little bit of roleplay. The kind where your characters have some sort of personality and you try to play it out in the world of the game. Would you mind if your characters have to talk a bit more in-character?" It's okay if they refuse. Soft drinks and pretzels and OOC chit-chat is a perfectly valid way to play (as they're demostrated before).

    Let's say they're onboard with increasing roleplay. Ask the players why they don't roleplay so much - it gives insight as to what pushes them away from RP. Afterwards, make some sort of arrangement as to when they're expected to do some IC talking, and how they should do it. Make sure they succeed, since this will be their first impressions of roleplay, and punishing them for not doing well just turns them off. Would you like to lose your first fight in a campaign because you're a level 1 warrior with only a wooden nonmagical club facing a vampire meant for a party of level 13 characters?

    Don't use mechanical social skills such as Diplomancy. You'll punishing the players for not sacrificing their combat skills, which only helps to feed into the Stormwind Fallacy. It does not breed a positive attitude towards roleplaying.
    Last edited by goto124; 2015-10-23 at 11:57 AM.

  12. - Top - End - #12
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Regitnui's Avatar

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by goto124 View Post
    To be honest, if the DM talked to me like that, I would feel as if xe were insulting my (character's) intelligence. "What, no, I ask politely, why did you think otherwise? Were you going to have the innkeeper refuse to let our characters have the rooms because we were apparently that socially challenged?"

    If it's something like "we get rooms for the night", the players probably want to quickly go past the relatively boring asking-for-rooms stuff and go straight to (preparing for) the next day of adventure. Roleplay has to be fun.

    If the players are so roleplay-adverse, even before the game starts, there must be some sort of arrangement as to when they're expected to do some IC talking.
    It was an example. Another could be "I demand the lich releases the prisoners." "How so? Do you shout it at him from the doorway, walk in and threaten him or just open negotiations with an arrow through the sacrificial dagger?"
    Spoiler: Quotes from the Playground
    Show
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJ View Post
    In fact, I will here formally propose the Zeroth Rule of Gaming: No rule in any game shall be interpreted in a way that breaks the game if it is possible to interpret that rule in a way that does not.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nifft View Post
    Good old Jes, the infamous Doppelganger MILF.

    (aka "The Doppelbanger")
    Quote Originally Posted by Beleriphon View Post
    Shhhhh, shhhhhh. Be calm, inhale the beholder's wacky float gas and stop worrying.


    Adapting published monsters to Eberron: Naturalist's Guide to Eberron Latest: Annis Hag

    Avatarial Awesomeness by Kymme!

  13. - Top - End - #13
    Troll in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

    Join Date
    Aug 2014

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    In terms of "whether it's roleplaying," there's no difference between

    1) "Ok, I tell the group what I overheard about the ambush they're planning" on the one hand, and

    2) "*fake Ye Olde Butcherede Englishe accent* My good comrades, it is imperative that I relay unto thee the conversation I didst overhear (for in my absence from your midst, I engaged myself in the proverbial dropping-of-eaves upon our employer). Lord Blackwood didst convey unto Captain Red-Chert that he layeth a terrible scheme! We are to be but pawns, guiding the expedition into an ambush!"

    Both are roleplaying; the second is (a very exaggerated version of) acting as well. Players who like roleplaying do not necessarily also like acting.
    Last edited by JAL_1138; 2015-10-23 at 11:54 AM.
    Spoiler: Playground Quotes
    Show

    Quote Originally Posted by Safety Sword View Post
    JAL_1138: Founding Member of the Paranoid Adventurer's Guild.
    Quote Originally Posted by TeChameleon View Post
    - If it's something mortals were not meant to know, I've already found six different ways to blow myself and/or someone else up with it.
    Gnomish proverb


    I use blue text for silliness and/or sarcasm. Do not take anything I say in blue text seriously, except for this sentence and the one preceding it.

  14. - Top - End - #14
    Pixie in the Playground
     
    ElfWarriorGuy

    Join Date
    Mar 2015

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Yes, it was just an off hand example.

    Player: "I tell the king that he has to help us stop the lich!"
    DM: "Are you demanding or asking?"

    Player: "I'm angrily shouting at him to get him to listen."
    OR
    Player: "I am pleading with him to save his people."

    I've been reading a lot of TheAngryGM lately, and I see it as the Objective and Approach method. To get players thinking for their characters, you need to figure out what they want to accomplish and how they want to accomplish it. Easiest way is to ask!

    If you care about the mundane, you use this sort of approach with inn keepers. If you focus on the dramatic, you use it in tense situations with important people!

  15. - Top - End - #15
    Troll in the Playground
     
    Solaris's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Neither here nor there
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    I'm fairly big on roleplaying, myself, and even I don't particularly care for it when the DM starts roleplaying with himself. (Fortunately, in the group where I alternate DM duties with another player, he and I both actively avoid doing it.) From the sounds of it, your group isn't that big on roleplaying to begin with. Introducing them to the concept through "Roleplaying is listening to me talk to myself about things you don't really care that much about" isn't going to win any converts.

    If you want to write a story, that's swell. I'm never one to discourage another aspiring writer. However, gamemastering is not writing. When you write, you can do things like have the characters engage in dialogue without anyone interrupting or getting bored. You can also do things like write plots. Running a game, however, is much closer to improv acting than it is writing. You don't really write a plot, you establish a setting. Sure, you can provide some nudges here and there, but it's nowhere near the degree of control (or detail) found in writing a story.

    This goes into the fluff, as well. You don't read or listen to roleplaying, you roleplay. You players aren't interested in fluff; most people (for reasons which utterly escape me) aren't interested in history, either. Even when they're invested in the setting, which is a loveless bitch to get players to do, they're probably not going to be interested in more than skimming a paragraph or two of infodump and want to listen to even less. Interweave information about the setting into conversations with NPCs and environmental details as you describe things to them, and if it's interesting to the demented little homicidal psychopaths players then their characters will follow up on it without prompting.

    Also keep in mind that third-person roleplaying is a thing (like JAL_1138 said). I'll rarely address an NPC in the first-person in-character. Heck, a lot of the time I'll skip coming up with exact wording ("My character asks about such-and-such" rather than "My character says, 'What about such-and-such?'"), because doing it takes a bit of effort and only rarely is a scene interesting enough to me to put forth the effort of getting all the way into character. (It also doesn't help that my character's something of an oversized ham who kinda lacks inside voice, and I like big climactic battles a lot more than I like talking with generic quest-giving old man in the tavern #9,141.)

    I have to agree with Regitnui and Lost in Hyrule - asking for further information about how the character acts can be very a useful way for karinrin55 to get her players to ease into roleplaying. If the DM doesn't really provide useful information about context or setting, jumping straight into character from a cold start can be a bitch.
    Last edited by Solaris; 2015-10-23 at 11:57 AM.
    My latest homebrew: Majokko base class and Spellcaster Dilettante feats for D&D 3.5 and Races as Classes for PTU.

    Currently Playing
    Raiatari Eikibe - Ghostfoot's RHOD Righteous Resistance

  16. - Top - End - #16
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    RangerGuy

    Join Date
    Dec 2014

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    I must say, those are much better examples. Heck, I would've asked that even if I wasn't looking for roleplay, since what exactly the PCs did are rather important as to how the NPCs will react and how the story will continue.

    Unlike the inn rooms scene, where the choice is either 'boring stuff happens and they get a room' or 'they don't get rooms for stuff that shouldn't even happen'.

  17. - Top - End - #17
    Troll in the Playground
     
    Solaris's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Neither here nor there
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by goto124 View Post
    Unlike the inn rooms scene, where the choice is either 'boring stuff happens and they get a room' or 'they don't get rooms for stuff that shouldn't even happen'.
    I agree.
    Getting rooms at inns, buying things at a market, and most other one-off interactions with people nobody cares about are generally best glossed over and skipped to things that are actually interesting.
    I mean, I can get a hotel room and shop at a market in real life. Why would I wanna RP it in a game?
    My latest homebrew: Majokko base class and Spellcaster Dilettante feats for D&D 3.5 and Races as Classes for PTU.

    Currently Playing
    Raiatari Eikibe - Ghostfoot's RHOD Righteous Resistance

  18. - Top - End - #18
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    RangerGuy

    Join Date
    Dec 2014

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    It can be interesting, but not with people who have barely started roleplay. The resulting RP will be real boring, and the players will think of all RP as 'boring'.

    If you introduced someone to tabletop games for the first time ever, do you make that person play CoC, to have the character die in 10 minutes?

    "I demand the lich releases the prisoners." "How so? Do you shout it at him from the doorway, walk in and threaten him or just open negotiations with an arrow through the sacrificial dagger?"
    This reminds me: the GM can make roleplay easier on the players, by providing options for players to choose from. Otherwise they could get stuck trying to come up with something viable.
    Last edited by goto124; 2015-10-23 at 12:05 PM.

  19. - Top - End - #19
    Colossus in the Playground
     
    Flickerdart's Avatar

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    NYC
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    I fully agree with the "don't focus on minutia" crowd. You may be better off trying to get the PCs to roleplay their relationships with each other - get them to establish how one murderhobo is related to the next and what their goals are.
    Quote Originally Posted by Inevitability View Post
    Greater
    \ˈgrā-tər \
    comparative adjective
    1. Describing basically the exact same monster but with twice the RHD.
    Quote Originally Posted by Artanis View Post
    I'm going to be honest, "the Welsh became a Great Power and conquered Germany" is almost exactly the opposite of the explanation I was expecting

  20. - Top - End - #20
    Halfling in the Playground
     
    GreataxeFighterGuy

    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    WA, USA
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    My group tries to be in character as much as possible. We still have normal chit chat and all that, but the players voice their characters when talking with NPCs and each other.
    When the group is talking to an NPC, for example:

    Player 2: How much for that item, my good man?
    NPC: That would be 10 gold, sir.
    Player 1: (jokingly) we should just steal it instead!
    NPC:Er, if you wouldn't mind, I would like your friend to leave my shop please.

    I dont force my players to rp, but if they dont want to they can at least let others who want to actually do it. Also, if someone who is LG makes frequent jokes about murdering innocents, they're looking at an alignment switch coming up.
    When they party is coming up with a plan, say, to break in somewhere, they must plan it all out before hand. If, during the mission, the rouge is on his own and forgets to unlock the door, the party cant remind him from 2oo ft away. Not without shouting, anyway.
    "I soil his pants." -Adren Wrenne, Bard

  21. - Top - End - #21
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    BarbarianGuy

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by karinrin55 View Post
    Plus I am working hard on dialing down NPC dialog with one another, I'm an amateur writer in addition to everything and I get so caught up with a story that I don't realize I've written half a page of dialog that won't interest the PCs at all.
    Try to separate your story writing from your game prep. Designing an rpg adventure is not as similar to writing a story as you'd think. Basically, your writing for the game should end at the outline. You design characters that have motives, design a world and locations that have some context, and decide what should draw the characters into the situation. There should be few events planned, since you don't know where exactly the players will go or what they will do. Video game style "cut scenes", where the players have to watch or listen to something happening that they aren't supposed to interrupt or interact with should be avoided. Background info that all the characters should have can be provided in a handout or short exposition at the beginning of the game. In-game plot exposition in general should only happen at the behest of players seeking it out; for example when they ask questions of an npc or research something in a library.

    A mistake some people make is thinking that the game should proceed as though it is a novel or a movie, and attempt to force the players to fulfill certain roles and react in certain ways, as though they are actors with a script. The problem is, they don't have a script and the story's overall shape and outcome is supposed to be hidden from them. It just doesn't work that way. Ask the players to provide motives for their characters relevant to your game. Then give them opportunities to pursue those motives in the game world. That's where the role playing happens, when players know and choose what their characters want and are able to freely interact with your game world to seek those things.

    A good adventure draws in the players because it offers them a chance to pursue the goals of their characters. It then offers challenges which they need to solve using their characters' abilities, and rewards them for successful solutions with achievement of some progress toward their characters' goals (getting more powerful, getting richer, raising in status, defeating an enemy, fulfilling religious obligations, etc).

    A not-so-exciting adventure tells the players what it is their characters are supposed to want, then brings them from one scene to the next without much input from them. They watch events unfold and are occasionally asked to roll a skill or fight enemies that appear before you describe the next scene to them. If they are failing to figure out something or make a specific action, your story can't continue until they do the correct thing or are forced along anyways. The players here will have less investment in their characters because they will see that they aren't really controlling anything. In this situation, some will rebel and try to throw your story off by doing things contrary to what they should. Others will play along, but are basically just waiting for the combats, which is the only time they actually have real decisions to make.

  22. - Top - End - #22
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    mephnick's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2012

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    My group talks entire OOC for the most part. Even when they talk IC it's obviously just them talking to me as themselves.

    I generally ask for "I'll try and scare the king into helping me by hinting another kingdom is coming for him, rolled a 16" over "I use persuasion on the king, rolled a 16."

    I hate acting as a DM, so I don't require my players to do so.

  23. - Top - End - #23
    Pixie in the Playground
     
    ElfWarriorGuy

    Join Date
    Mar 2015

    tongue Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by goto124 View Post
    I must say, those are much better examples. Heck, I would've asked that even if I wasn't looking for roleplay, since what exactly the PCs did are rather important as to how the NPCs will react and how the story will continue.

    Unlike the inn rooms scene, where the choice is either 'boring stuff happens and they get a room' or 'they don't get rooms for stuff that shouldn't even happen'.
    Hey, you don't know me!

    Perhaps this is an oft frequented tavern between two major cities, so all sorts of folks come through. The tavern keeper looks up, a little nervous at the 3 vagabonds that have just walked in. The gruff man in front tosses a few coins at the bar in front of the owner and growls, "Three rooms, got it?" The look of nervousness leaves the owner's face, and he says, "Yes, of course." He leads them upstairs and offers the first room to the one he spoke with, and then the next two to his companions. "Enjoy your stay."

    That night, the demon who demands a sacrifice from this tavern owner once a month creeps in to the first room up the stairs and steals away the gruff man to serve as his dinner.

    His brusque attitude sure did make the Tavern Owner's job a lot easier this month!

  24. - Top - End - #24
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Imp

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Sweden
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by karinrin55 View Post
    The problem with this is that we have two new players in our group that still don't fully understand the game (I've been playing for about three years and I'm still not familiar with every rule there is so OOC talk can't be obsolete cause they still need a bit of help. But generally all your advice is really helpful, I'm meeting with the group tonight (not for D&D though) and I'll ask them if they wouldn't mind role=playing more intensely in my campaign.
    Plus I am working hard on dialing down NPC dialog with one another, I'm an amateur writer in addition to everything and I get so caught up with a story that I don't realize I've written half a page of dialog that won't interest the PCs at all.
    Generally when it comes to NPC dialog it's better to just state the outcome (unless it the players are supposed to interject in the dialog), talking in character is very important when talking with the players and when they talk with each other.

    A good springboard for roleplaying is something players like doing, shopping. When they go and buy the adventuring gear. This is an opportunity to ambush them with a quick and concise description of the town/village they're in, describing the various places they can go to and also add color to the environment, like if there are kids playing in the street, or if there's lots of traffic, or town guards, etc.
    When they go to a blacksmith to buy a sword you can tell them "you enter the blacksmiths yard, there's racks filled with various tools, the blacksmith- a young woman in a dirt apron walks up to you Hello strangers, what can I do you for?".
    If they try to speak out of character remind them that you only speak the language of in character. This sort of thing can be applied pretty much in all situations, roleplaying isn't just fluff, it's the medium through which the game is played.

    Edit- the rules are important, but don't worry if you don't get everything right. As a DM you have the power of making stuff up on the fly, it's better to invent new rules than to break the flow of the game. Though that's my opinion, some may disagree.
    Last edited by Mastikator; 2015-10-23 at 01:00 PM.
    Black text is for sarcasm, also sincerity. You'll just have to read between the lines and infer from context like an animal

  25. - Top - End - #25
    Troll in the Playground
     
    Solaris's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Neither here nor there
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastikator View Post
    A good springboard for roleplaying is something players like doing, shopping. When they go and buy the adventuring gear. This is an opportunity to ambush them with a quick and concise description of the town/village they're in, describing the various places they can go to and also add color to the environment, like if there are kids playing in the street, or if there's lots of traffic, or town guards, etc.
    When they go to a blacksmith to buy a sword you can tell them "you enter the blacksmiths yard, there's racks filled with various tools, the blacksmith- a young woman in a dirt apron walks up to you Hello strangers, what can I do you for?".
    If they try to speak out of character remind them that you only speak the language of in character. This sort of thing can be applied pretty much in all situations, roleplaying isn't just fluff, it's the medium through which the game is played.
    Point of order: None of my groups and none of my players in nearly twenty years of playing have enjoyed shopping.
    ... Well, except my wife, but even she doesn't like doing it in the game.
    My latest homebrew: Majokko base class and Spellcaster Dilettante feats for D&D 3.5 and Races as Classes for PTU.

    Currently Playing
    Raiatari Eikibe - Ghostfoot's RHOD Righteous Resistance

  26. - Top - End - #26
    Pixie in the Playground
     
    ElfWarriorGuy

    Join Date
    Mar 2015

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by Mastikator View Post
    If they try to speak out of character remind them that you only speak the language of in character. This sort of thing can be applied pretty much in all situations, roleplaying isn't just fluff, it's the medium through which the game is played.
    Talking In Character is not necessary to Role Play. This is certainly a way you could go about getting your players to talk in character, but it could also turn them off the game entirely, or make them quite uncomfortable. Now, being pushed out of your comfort zone isn't necessarily a bad thing! But you should definitely think carefully if you are willing to tell your players, "I like in-character dialogue. You must play this way to play in my game!"

  27. - Top - End - #27
    Troll in the Playground
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Apologies in advance, but I didn't read the whole thread. I did, however, do a word search for "inspiration" and nothing came up. I don't know if you're running 5e but if you are read up on inspiration. It's a carrot (as opposed to a stick) to reward characters for good role-playing. I like to actually hand them an inspiration token. Having that physical representation that they can then turn in for advantage on some roll can have quite a psychological impact. After a while, they might just start enjoying role-playing just for its own sake.

    Spoiler: Pics of my tokens
    Show


    Quote Originally Posted by Lost in Hyrule View Post
    Talking In Character is not necessary to Role Play. This is certainly a way you could go about getting your players to talk in character, but it could also turn them off the game entirely, or make them quite uncomfortable. Now, being pushed out of your comfort zone isn't necessarily a bad thing! But you should definitely think carefully if you are willing to tell your players, "I like in-character dialogue. You must play this way to play in my game!"
    I actually wrote a song for my bard in anticipation of a particular event in the game. I was really proud of it and looking forward to singing it in-character. When the time came and I was not singing it loudly enough (in a big room that had a lot more going on than just our D&D game), the DM said "Come on! Belt it out!" I clammed up and didn't bother singing it. I think that's a great example of making someone uncomfortable with role-playing. Baby steps.
    Last edited by Dalebert; 2015-10-23 at 01:25 PM.
    If you cast Dispel Magic on my Gust of Wind, does that mean you're disgusting?

    In real estate, they say it's all about location, location, location. In D&D I say it's about action economy, action economy, action economy.

    Crystal Mage -- a homebrewed arcane tradition

  28. - Top - End - #28
    Troll in the Playground
     
    BardGuy

    Join Date
    Aug 2014

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by mephnick View Post
    My group talks entire OOC for the most part. Even when they talk IC it's obviously just them talking to me as themselves.

    I generally ask for "I'll try and scare the king into helping me by hinting another kingdom is coming for him, rolled a 16" over "I use persuasion on the king, rolled a 16."

    I hate acting as a DM, so I don't require my players to do so.
    Doing it this way also avoids penalizing a socially-awkward person, or even someone ok at general socializing but not good at improv acting, who's trying to play a socially-skilled character. Lord knows my bard character would be in trouble if I had to talk in-character for him to flirt or flatter, for instance.

    Like you, I generally don't let "I roll Bluff" to skate by, but "I tell the guard I'm a noble and flash a fake signet ring--16?" is perfectly fine by me.
    Last edited by JAL_1138; 2015-10-23 at 01:30 PM.
    Spoiler: Playground Quotes
    Show

    Quote Originally Posted by Safety Sword View Post
    JAL_1138: Founding Member of the Paranoid Adventurer's Guild.
    Quote Originally Posted by TeChameleon View Post
    - If it's something mortals were not meant to know, I've already found six different ways to blow myself and/or someone else up with it.
    Gnomish proverb


    I use blue text for silliness and/or sarcasm. Do not take anything I say in blue text seriously, except for this sentence and the one preceding it.

  29. - Top - End - #29
    Ettin in the Playground
     
    Honest Tiefling's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jun 2011

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    I think that minor interactions should be kept to a minimum, but that they have a place. You're all at the tavern, you need to establish some characters quickly and get things across. A short interaction with NPCs is like that bit in the movies where they establish the who's who of the cast. Otherwise, unless it serves the plot (a character is trying to charm an innkeep to later use as a pawn, for instance), I'd gloss over the interactions quickly.

    I would be careful about handing out tokens for 'good' roleplay, because everyone's definition is different. I've often found that some DMs do this quite poorly and only reward their favorite archetypes. Which gets to be a problem if the DM prefers cool types that plan things out carefully, but the party is faced with a situation where 'burn everything' is effective, efficient, safe, and/or cheap and the players believe their characters would genuinely do that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oko and Qailee View Post
    Man, I like this tiefling.
    For all of your completely and utterly honest needs. Zaydos made, Tiefling approved.

  30. - Top - End - #30
    Troll in the Playground
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Is role-playing worth it? :smalleek:

    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Tiefling View Post
    I would be careful about handing out tokens for 'good' roleplay, because everyone's definition is different.
    Sure. I should say sincere attempts at role-playing, particularly if it's purely for the sake of role-playing and not necessarily just the obviously beneficial thing to do but you're actually playing your character's personality honestly, whatever you've decided it to be. I think the 5e book emphasizes rewarding inspiration when a player acts out their characters flaws when it's not beneficial to the party but I'm more liberal with it, at least with newer players who are just getting their feet wet with role-playing.
    If you cast Dispel Magic on my Gust of Wind, does that mean you're disgusting?

    In real estate, they say it's all about location, location, location. In D&D I say it's about action economy, action economy, action economy.

    Crystal Mage -- a homebrewed arcane tradition

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •