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    Dwarf in the Playground
     
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    Lightbulb "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    Ever felt that combat in D&D can get a little routine and predictable? Having a hard time visualising a battle where the combatants take turns acting for six seconds? Then perhaps the "shots" variant initiative-system is for you! The aim of the system is to give combat a better feel of pace, and make play more cinematic, as well as creating new possibilities for tactical gameplay.

    The shots-system is the system used in the rpg Feng Shui, a game set in the world of Hong Kong action-movies. The combat there is simplistic, but manages to capture the hectic feel of a battle better than D20 in my opinion.

    When I went back to playing D&D, combat seemed more of a drag than ever, and I decided to implement "shots" into my D&D-campaign. The game I ran was already packed with houserules, and thus the system I used can't be imported directly into a standard D&D game. But I've decided to convert it to fit into the more traditional rules in hope that others will be able to benefit from the system as much as I have. So without further ado: The D20 shots-system.

    Terminology:

    Shot: Approximately one second of time. The shortest unit of time in the system.

    Round: Four shots. Translates roughly to a round in traditional D&D, and is used for most of the traditional rules concerning rounds.

    Sequence: A period of 20 shots. This could be more or less if you are using a custom table, as it is only limited by the size of your shots-table.
    Picture of my custom shots-table. Following the post will be a lot easier if you've seen the image.
    (Warning, large image.)
    Spoiler
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    As I believe it is the easiest way to learn it, I will present the different rules in the order that they would logically be used in a real session:

    Initiative: All players roll initiative, and the Dungeon Master rolls initiative for the NPCs. The higher you roll, the higher you will be in the shots-table when the combat starts. You roll a d20, and use the same modifiers you would use when throwing initiative in a regular D&D combat.

    If you roll 9 or lower, you start on shot 18. If you roll from 10-19 you start on shot 19. If you roll 20 or higher, you start on shot 20.

    This system ensures that no players will be able to pound away on someone for more than two seconds before they can react, and also avoids not making dexterity too powerful. However, you might want to change the numbers the players will have to roll depending on your play-style and the power-level of your campaign.

    Each player has a custom counter (Mine use blank d4s with their names written on them, but anything will do), and the dungeon-master will need a large variety of small counters for NPCs (coloured beads do nicely). The counters are placed on shot 18, 19 or 20, depending on how high the initiative-roll was. The ones who have their counters on the highest number can then act.

    Deciding who goes first: There will always be several counters on the same shot in a combat, and you will need to have a way to determine who goes first when this happens.

    After feedback from the community, I believe to have found the to fastest and fairest ways to do this.

    The first is keeping track of what initiative each character rolled initially, having the one who had the higher roll go first if there are several characters on one shot. If there is a tie, have the characters roll an unmodified d20s to determine who goes first. (Thanks to Miles Invictus for this rule)

    Another possibility is having the one with the highest dexterity-score go first. If there is a tie, have the characters in question roll unmodified d20s to determine who goes first. (Thanks to Fax_Celestis)

    Actions: Once it has been decided who goes first, the character will have to decide what to do on that shot. Different actions take different amounts of time. I will go into detail later on, but if not stated otherwise actions in traditional D&D translates into this in the shots-system:

    Free-action: One shot
    Move-action: Two shots
    Standard-action: Three shots
    Full-round-action: Four shots
    When you execute the action, you move your counter this amount of shots down the table. Even though actions take multiple shots, they are considered to be executed on the first shot. Thus, if you can act on shot 15, and you attack someone who can act on shot 14, you resolve the attack on them before they can act, even though your attack takes three shots.

    After you are done with your action and have moved your counter, the character that then has the highest number on the shots-table can act. When a characters counter reaches shot "0" or lower, he places his counter on one of the top four shots, depending on where he landed. For instance, if you are on shot 1 and perform a standard acton, taking three shots, you end up on shot -2 (1 - 3 = -2). Shot 0 translates to shot 20, -1 to 19, -2 to 18 and -3 to 17. Place your counter outside the appropriate shot, and wait for all characters who are still in the previous sequence to finish. When everyone have moved their counters back to the top row, place the counters inside the "shot-slots" and keep playing as normal.

    Shot-costs of specific actions

    1-shot actions:

    1-shot actions includes anything described as a free-action in traditional D&D, as well as some things that aren't usually considered to take any time at all (such as 5-foot steps). However, most one-shot actions can be done at the same time as actions taking longer, thus still making them "free" in most cases.

    If a 1-shot action is combined with a two-shot action they can be combined into a single three-shot action. This might not seem to make much of a difference, but being able to execute two actions before the guy on the shot after you is able to act can sometimes be very handy.

    If a 1-shot action is combined with an action taking three shots or more, the 1-shot action takes 0 shots. However, this can only be done when the two actions can logically be used at the same time. Thus no THF and shuriken-throwing at the same time. Moving and attacking in the same three shots is a common example of a combined action. Also, only one 1-shot action can be combined at a time. Thus you can't both attack (3 shots), 5-foot-step (1 shot) and cast a quickened spell (1 shot), all in 3 shots.

    You can also combine a 1-shot action with another 1-shot action into a 2-shot action, but not three 1-shot actions into a 3-shot action.

    Special: Speaking Though speaking is described as a free-action it does not hinder you in doing other free-actions, provided they are not verbal in nature.

    Specific 1-shot actions:

    • 5-foot-step: Some players might want to keep the 5-foot-step holy, as making it incompatible with doing other free-actions in the same shot will make some tactics in traditional D&D impossible. However, with the way the movement-system works in my system, I believe it is the best way to do it.
    • Normal move: In one shot you can move a number of feet equal to one third of your "move". Thus a normal human can move 10ft (30ft / 3) in one second. This becomes 60ft in 6 seconds (shots), the same distance as one could walk in one round with a double move.
      This rule might become a problem for creatures with speeds not dividable by three, especially if you want to keep creatures inside the combat-grid. Rounding down to the nearest 5ft is a possible solution, but it will mean that dwarves could only move 5ft a second. You might allow characters with such low move-ratings to move as if they had higher speeds when walking, or just have them running more.
    • Run: You can run up to 2/3 of your move in one shot. This means that an average human could run 20 ft (30ft * 2/3). However, this must be in a straight line. If you combine a run-action with an attack, this counts as a charge, and gives you the normal +2 to hit and -2 to AC.

      MOVEMENT TABLE
      {table=head]Move |walk (exact)|run (exact)|walk (squares)|run (squares)

      5 ft|
      1 ft
      |
      3 ft (1 square)
      |
      1
      |
      1

      10 ft|
      3 ft
      |
      6 ft
      |
      1
      |
      1

      15 ft|
      5 ft
      |
      10 ft
      |
      1
      |
      2

      20 ft|
      6 ft
      |
      13 ft
      |
      1
      |
      2

      30 ft|
      10 ft
      |
      20 ft
      |
      2
      |
      4

      40 ft|
      13 ft
      |
      26 ft
      |
      2
      |
      5

      50 ft|
      16 ft
      |
      33 ft
      |
      3
      |
      6

      60 ft|
      20 ft
      |
      40 ft
      |
      4
      |
      8
      [/table]
    • Cast quickened spell
    • Loading a bow: Without any feats, loading a bow takes one shot.
    • Continuous actions: Any repetitive action, such as pciking a lock, takes one and one shot until it is completed.
    • Delay: Standing around doing nothing is always a good way to use a shot.
    • Anything else described as a free-action in traditional D&D and not mentioned another place in this post


    2-shot actions:

    2-shot actions can hardly be called move-actions anymore since moving is now in the area of free-actions, but other actions than moving described as move-actions usually still fall within this category.

    Specific 2-shot actions:

    • Firing a bow or crossbow: If your bow or crossbow is already loaded, firing it takes two shots.
    • Loading a crossbow: Without any feats, loading a crossbow takes two shots.
    • Draw a weapon
    • Anything else described as a move-action in traditional D&D and not mentioned another place in this post


    3-shot actions:

    Are mostly what was called standard-actions before. This is the number of shots a character will usually be spending each time it is his turn, usually combined with a 1-shot-action.

    Specific 3-shot actions:

    • A single attack: The most basic of all attacks takes three shots to execute. If combined with a 1-shot run-action, the attack counts as a charge.
    • Casting a spell: This applies to spells normally having a casting-time of one standard-action.
    • Anything else described as a standard-action in traditional D&D and not mentioned another place in this post


    4-shot actions

    Mostly actions that were considered full-round actions before. That they take 4 seconds as opposed to six is unproblematic in most cases, and for most action I think it gives the best balance compared to other actions. The main reason for not exceeding four shots is still that it would ruin the whole point of the shots-system, which is to create a more dynamic combat which is not split up into large bulks of time.

    Specific 4-shot actions:

    • Full attack: This includes attacking with two weapons, a monk's flurry or multiple attacks due to high BaB. Characters will be swinging their swords 50% faster than in traditional D&D. Though this is not usually a problem, especially at low levels.
    • Anything else described as a full-round-action in traditional D&D and not mentioned another place in this post


    Durations of spells and effects:

    Perhaps the hardest things to convert from traditional D&D initiative into the shots-system are spells and effects with short durations. The problems with spell-durations arise when keeping track of when a spell or effect expires.

    The best way is probably to write down on what shot the effect expires. When the last character reaches the shot noted, the effect ends. For effects with durations short enough to end within the current sequence, you might want to place a special spell-counter on the shot in question to remind you. For effects with longer durations, noting it down is probably better.

    You will have to decide whether you let effects with durations such as 1 round/level last 4 shots/level or 6 shots/level. Personally I use 4 shots/level, but there really isn't much reason not to keep them at 6 shots/level other than to avoid confusion in using two different types of rounds.

    Short example of play:

    [quote]Haley the rogue and Elan the bard have encountered a group of four hobgoblins in a castle courtyard. There is 30' between them. They roll initiative.

    Elan rolls 12 + 2 = 14, and thus begins on shot 19.

    Haley rolls 15 + 5 = 20, and begins on shot 20.

    The hobgoblins roll 3, 9 and 16, so two of them begin on shot 18, and one on shot 19.

    Haley decides to shoot a hobgoblin with her bow. She combines drawing an arrow (1 shot) with firing an arrow (2 shots) into a 3-shot action. She cannot 5ft-step at the same time, as the combined action already includes a 1-shot action. The hobgoblin has not acted yet, and is thus flat-footed, so it is easily a hit, dropping lifeless to the ground. Haley moves her counter three shots down, to shot 17.

    Seeing that there are no more counters on shot 20, we move on to shot 19. Both Elan and a hobgoblin are placed on this shot. The DM has decided to let the one who rolled the highest initiative initially act first when there is a tie, thus the hobgoblin can act before Elan.

    The hobgoblin wields a longspear, and thus only needs to cover 20ft to attack Elan. He combines a 20ft run (1 shot) with an attack (3 shots) into a combined 3-shot action. This attack counts as a charge, but the hobgoblin misses, despite the bonus to his attack-roll. The DM moves the counter three shots down, to shot 16.

    Elan is the only one left on shot 19, and he can act. He combines a 5-foot step towards the hobgoblin (1 shot) with a full-attack (4 shots) with his rapier into a 4-shot action. Having a BaB high enough for two attacks/round, he hits the hobgoblin two times, killing him. He moves his counter down four shots, to shot 15.

    There are no counters left on shot 19, and we move on to shot 18. There is only one hobgoblin left standing, and he is on shot 18. He turns out to be a spellcaster, and flings a combined 3-shot summon monster IV (3 shots) and quickened daze (1-shot). Elan is dazed (yeah, I know about the HD-thing, but lets look past that), losing his next action. Elan will have to move his counter 4 shots down the next time he can act. He does not move his counter immediately, in case the spell is dispelled before his turn. The DM places a new counter on shot 18 for the summoned fiendish dire wolf, who gets to act next.[quote]

    Additional rules:

    What makes the shot-system fun is not only the different "feel" it gives combat, but also the possibility to build new spells, feats and abilities around it, introducing a wide array of tactical manoeuvres in combat. Here are some examples:

    Melf's Acidic Touch
    Transmutation
    Level: Sor/Wiz 3
    Components: V, S, M
    Casting Time: 3 shots (1 standard action)
    Range: Touch
    Target: 1 Creature or Object Touched
    Duration: 1 shot/level
    Saving Throw: Fortitude negates
    Spell Resistance: Yes

    Your touch becomes highly acidic, eating through the creature or object touched. This spell delivers 2 points of acid-damage every shot it is active.
    Material Component: Powdered lemongrass
    Focused Dodge [GENERAL]
    When focusing on dodging, you become a difficult target.
    Prerequisites: Dex 13, Dodge
    Benefits: When you are the target of an attack, you can as an instantaneous action move one shot down the shot-table to gain a +4 bonus to Armour Class against that attack.
    Normal: You cannot spend shots to increase your Armour Class.
    Rapid Spell [METAMAGIC]
    Cast a spell more rapidly.
    Benefits: Casting a Rapid Spell is a two-shot action. A rapid spell uses up a spell slot one level higher than the actual spell's level.
    Special: This feat can't be applied to any spell cast spontaneously, since applying a metamagic feat to a spontaneously cast spell automatically increases the casting-time to a 4-shot action.
    These are just examples. The shot system can be built on to open a new dimension of custom spells, feats and other house rules, to spice up combat.

    I encourage anyone who is tired of the old combat-system or just wants to try something new to try out the shots-system. As I DM a campaign that uses a lot of other house rules, this particular version of the system, which is designed to keep changes to other rules than initiative in D&D to a minimum, has not been thoroughly playtested. I therefore hope that anyone who decides to try it, or spots any flaws simply from reading the rules, reports it in this thread so that I can do my best to fix it. If anyone has any ideas for custom spells, feats or other abilities that take advantage of the system, please post them below.

    The system is not as complicated or time-consuming as it might look, and if both the DM and the players learn the rules by heart, and don't shy away from improvising a little when problems occur, it runs quite smoothly.

    Have fun playing

    Ceres
    Last edited by Ceres; 2007-06-17 at 08:53 AM. Reason: Fixed error in the example

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    Barbarian in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    Quote Originally Posted by Ceres View Post
    Deciding who goes first: There will always be several counters on the same shot in a combat, and there is a number of ways in which to determine who goes first.

    The most fair, but also by far the most time-consuming, is having all characters on the same shot roll an unmodified d20, and have the highest roller go first. However, this can seriously slow down combat, and probably shouldn't be used.
    Use D&D's default initiative rules for tie-breaking. You've already made an initiative roll -- you can use the results of that, instead of rolling a second time.

    For example: Player A rolls a 19, B rolls a 13, and C rolls a 17. All start on Shot 19. A acts first, then C, then B.

    Picture of my custom shots-table. Following the post will be a lot easier if you've seen the image.
    (Warning, large image. Click this link if you do not want to stress the forum's bandwidth):
    You're not saving bandwidth by hiding it in the spoiler tags. The spoiler tags only prevent the image from being seen, not from being downloaded.

    # Normal move: In one shot you can move a number of feet equal to one third of your "move". Thus a normal human can move 10ft (30ft / 3) in one second. This becomes 60ft in 6 seconds (shots), the same distance as one could walk in one round with a double move.
    This rule might become a problem for creatures with speeds not dividable by three, especially if you want to keep creatures inside the combat-grid. Rounding down to the nearest 5ft is a possible solution, but it will mean that dwarves could only move 5ft a second. You might allow characters with such low move-ratings to move as if they had higher speeds when walking, or just have them running more.
    # Run: You can run up to 2/3 of your move in one shot. This means that an average human could run 20 ft (30ft * 2/3). However, this must be in a straight line. If you combine a run-action with an attack, this counts as a charge, and gives you the normal +2 to hit and -2 to AC.
    The movement rules need a conversion table. It doesn't need to be very complex -- if your base speed is X, then per shot you can move Y.

    Incidentally, this is the sort of action system I've wanted to include in my own homebrewed RPGs, but never bothered to work out. It's more complicated than I'd thought.

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    Quote Originally Posted by Ceres View Post
    Initiative: All players roll initiative, and the Dungeon Master rolls initiative for the NPCs. The higher you roll, the higher you will be in the shots-table when the combat starts. You roll a d20, and use the same modifiers you would use when throwing initiative in a regular D&D combat.

    If you roll 9 or lower, you start on shot 18. If you roll from 10-19 you start on shot 19. If you roll 20 or higher, you start on shot 20.

    This system ensures that no players will be able to pound away on someone for more than two seconds before they can react, and also avoids not making dexterity too powerful. However, you might want to change the numbers the players will have to roll depending on your play-style and the power-level of your campaign.

    Each player has a custom counter (Mine use blank d4s with their names written on them, but anything will do), and the dungeon-master will need a large variety of small counters for NPCs (coloured beads do nicely). The counters are placed on shot 18, 19 or 20, depending on how high the initiative-roll was. The ones who have their counters on the highest number can then act.

    Deciding who goes first: There will always be several counters on the same shot in a combat, and there is a number of ways in which to determine who goes first.

    The most fair, but also by far the most time-consuming, is having all characters on the same shot roll an unmodified d20, and have the highest roller go first. However, this can seriously slow down combat, and probably shouldn't be used.

    Having the players go first makes things go faster, but will tend to tip the balance in the players' favour. Not rolling for the random "mook" NPCs, but rolling for the important, powerful ones is a possible solution.

    Also, you could allow the players to decide among themselves who goes first on a shot among themselves. This saves time, and allows for some tactical opportunities as well.
    How about this, each shot is a fifo (first in, first out) queue? to begin with, you sort starting positions on shorts 18 (-9), 19 (10-19) and 20 (20+) in a queue with people who rolled higher closer to the front in the queue (thus, rolling 19 is better than rolling 11). Then, when you move to the next shot, if no one is already on that shot you are in the front of the queue, if not, you enter the queue. Then, when that shot's turn comes up, whoever is in the front of the queue acts first, then the next person then the next. That work?
    Quote Originally Posted by starwoof View Post
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    Dwarf in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    Quote Originally Posted by Miles Invictus View Post
    Use D&D's default initiative rules for tie-breaking. You've already made an initiative roll -- you can use the results of that, instead of rolling a second time.

    For example: Player A rolls a 19, B rolls a 13, and C rolls a 17. All start on Shot 19. A acts first, then C, then B.
    Why didn't I think of that? That's probably a better solution then the examples I included. However, it does make having a high initiative more powerful. I guess I could use your method of dedciding who goes first on a shot, and just have everyone start at shot 20, no matter their roll. I'll consider including this rule in some form.

    Quote Originally Posted by Miles Invictus View Post
    You're not saving bandwidth by hiding it in the spoiler tags. The spoiler tags only prevent the image from being seen, not from being downloaded.
    I guess I'll have to put more ranks in my knowledge (intarnets)

    Quote Originally Posted by Miles Invictus View Post
    The movement rules need a conversion table. It doesn't need to be very complex -- if your base speed is X, then per shot you can move Y.
    The movement-system isn't really that complicated, but I was already thinking of including a table for it. It will be the next thing I'll ad.

    Quote Originally Posted by Miles Invictus View Post
    Incidentally, this is the sort of action system I've wanted to include in my own homebrewed RPGs, but never bothered to work out. It's more complicated than I'd thought.
    What do you mean, complicated? That my system is more complicated than what you had in mind, or that the process of making one is more complex than you had imagined?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyace View Post
    How about this, each shot is a fifo (first in, first out) queue? to begin with, you sort starting positions on shorts 18 (-9), 19 (10-19) and 20 (20+) in a queue with people who rolled higher closer to the front in the queue (thus, rolling 19 is better than rolling 11). Then, when you move to the next shot, if no one is already on that shot you are in the front of the queue, if not, you enter the queue. Then, when that shot's turn comes up, whoever is in the front of the queue acts first, then the next person then the next. That work?
    Do you mean that characters should put their counters in a physical queue on each shot? This would probably require a lot larger shot-slots. Or do you mean remembering or writing down who came first for each shot? This would probably be too time-consuming. Your idea is good, but perhaps a little too complicated. I'll think about it though.

    Incidently, I can't be adding more to the rules until Monday evening, since my final exam in mathematics is tomorrow. There are a few more rules to include, such as those for the durations of spells and effects, as well as doing some clearing up and adding examples, and I'll get to that as soon as possible.

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    FYI: A D&D round is six seconds, not four.

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    That was noted. But this is a variant action system, so you'd have an alteration. These rounds add up much shorter than Standard rounds, but you end up with three 'sequences' to a minute.
    I am trying out LPing. Check out my channel here: Triaxx2

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    D&D's initiative mechanic regarding ties is that the person with the higher Dexterity score goes first. If they have equal Dexterity scores, the one with the higher Initiative modifier goes first. If they are tied still, then each rolls another initiative against each other to determine who goes before the other.

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    Hmmn. Interesting. I have long been in favour of reducing the Round to three seconds, but I'm not sure this Shot System is for me. Still, Action Points and Action Costs are a preferable combat method.
    It is a joyful thing indeed to hold intimate converse with a man after one’s own heart, chatting without reserve about things of interest or the fleeting topics of the world; but such, alas, are few and far between.

    – Yoshida Kenko (1283-1350), Tsurezure-Gusa (1340)

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    Well I say. Someone brought my thread back from the dead (oooh, rhymed). I guess I'll have to start working on it again, then. My final exam in religion is tomorrow, but after that school is out, and I can get to completing it.

    @ Matthew: If you don't think the system is really for you, but like the general idea, please tell me on where you feel that improvements can be made. I'm all ears
    OotSP :D
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    My creations:
    Custom initiative system (shots)
    The Nameless [MitpII]
    D20 "total conversion" (will probably never be finished :P)

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    Sure. Dividing Actions up into 'shots' or Action Points and then assigning each Action a value is definitely a good idea. Bringing the Round down from Six seconds is also a good idea (though a three second round would be a lot easier to divide D&D into, I think). The problem for me, is the complexity of tracking counters over the shot table sequence. It would just be too much for my games, which tend to involve a lot of combatants.
    It is a joyful thing indeed to hold intimate converse with a man after one’s own heart, chatting without reserve about things of interest or the fleeting topics of the world; but such, alas, are few and far between.

    – Yoshida Kenko (1283-1350), Tsurezure-Gusa (1340)

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    *Updated* All the most important rules should be in now, and I've decided to no longer call the system a work-in-progress. There are bound to be some flaws, though. So please read through it and give me feedback. And if anyone decides to playtest it, all the better

    @Matthew: How many shots there should be in a round is of course open to debate. The reason I have chose four seconds, is that it is the amount of time in my system it will take for a character to do roughly the same as he would be able to do in a standard D&D-round, but changing it to three seconds certainly wouldn't ruin the system, though you would have to make some changes to the rules for spell-durations and full-round actions.

    As to using counters: I usually DM fights with a large amount of combatants too, and I must say that it isn't that hard to keep track of when you get used to it. You might consider using the variant where you write down which shot characters can act, rather than use a table, if you think this will make things easier. I do encourage you to try it out once, though. It might be easier than you think.
    OotSP :D
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    My creations:
    Custom initiative system (shots)
    The Nameless [MitpII]
    D20 "total conversion" (will probably never be finished :P)

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    Well, read about half of it (stopped around the examples) coming to the conclusion that this is a very cool and more realistic system, but a bit complex for my games. Nonetheless, I really like the idea, and may make a variant of it for my ship-based system.

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    I'm glad you like it, and as I've said before the system isn't as complicated as it might look at first glance. I suggest playtesting it, as this will give you a better picture.

    However, if you make a simplified verion anyway, I would very much like to see how it turns out.
    OotSP :D
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    My creations:
    Custom initiative system (shots)
    The Nameless [MitpII]
    D20 "total conversion" (will probably never be finished :P)

  14. - Top - End - #14
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Malek's Avatar

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    Elan is the only one left on shot 19, and he can act. He combines a 5-foot step towards the hobgoblin (1 shot) with a full-attack (3 shots) with his rapier into a 3-shot action.
    Ummm... full attack was described as an 4 shot action O.o

    Overall the system seems interesting, i'll try to give it a try if I have an ocasion ^^
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    One out - roam across the plain,
    One back - dwell with the tribe and tent,
    One in - turn an enemy's hate.
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  15. - Top - End - #15
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Ceres's Avatar

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    Default Re: "Shots" - Initiative system variant rule

    ^^ Oops. Heh, that was rather embarrassing. Here I am, bragging about how easy it is to use, and I screw it up in the example

    Fixing it now. Thanks, Malek.
    OotSP :D
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    My creations:
    Custom initiative system (shots)
    The Nameless [MitpII]
    D20 "total conversion" (will probably never be finished :P)

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