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  1. - Top - End - #1
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    Jormengand's Avatar

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    Oct 2012
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    In the Playground, duh.

    Default CORPS: Content-only Role-playing System.

    This is very much WIP and more a proof of concept than anything. Bear with me.

    To do: Weapons, monsters, more of everything I already have some of (spells, talents, chain attacks, levels of classes, etcetera).

    Introduction

    So, imagine you're playing a role-playing system, and someone rushes up to their opponent and starts grappling them. Oh, wow, you've never used the grappling rules before. Come to think of it, you can't remember them. Either you break out the book, trawl through page-long grapple rules, and confuse everyone, or you make something up on the fly. Someone, somewhere will probably trip over the character creation rules; people will forget obscure rules unless they've just been reading about them and have decided to take advantage of them, and so forth.

    So let's get rid of the rules. Let's just have content. Abilities. Things you can do.

    What you will need

    You need one player to run the game. This player is known as the Arbiter, although other games call them the Game Master, Dungeon Master, Storyteller, Director, or any number of other things. Their job is to create a storyline, control non-player characters (“NPCs”), and decide on the results of the players’ own actions based on their die rolls. You will need at least one other player to actually play the game, of course!

    You need 6-sided dice, or something equivalent (You can use 12-sided dice and halve the results, rounding up, if you really want!). You'll need something to write with, and on, and you'll need models to represent the characters.

    Rules?

    Okay, there have to be a few rules. But they're not the point, so there are only 6 of them:

    1. You start with 1 level. To advance from any level X to the level above, you require 10X "Experience points".
    2. You choose a class, and gain the benefits of that class based on the number of levels you have in it. You can put a level into another class when you attain it, and if you do, you track levels in each class separately when determining which benefits you get, and add anything together that you get from both. If they contradict each other (for example, on what kinds of weapons or armour you can wield), use the better in each instance (so an archer mage can wield bows because archers can and magic weapons because magi can).
    3. You have a number of hit points from your class and level, plus 10. When you reach 5, you fall unconscious. When you reach 0 you die. You get all your hit points back after you've had a good rest (what that means is the Arbiter's decision, but should be at least 6 hours' sleep).
    4. In combat, each player rolls dice equal to their initiative, and players act in rounds in descending initiative order until the end of the combat.
    5. Each turn, you can move up to 20 feet and take another action, or move up to 80 feet. Do not track position with squares; you simply choose a scale (eg 1 inch = 5 feet) and move your character's model the assigned distance.
    6. To Attack, Defend, Magic, Dodge, Resist or Overcome, you roll a number of dice equal to the number of points you have in that value, and try to beat the number given. "Resist 10" means "Roll a number of dice equal to your resistance. If you roll 10 or more, you have succeeded."


    Classes


    Yay, a class-based system! Well, don't worry if you don't like classes: there's a class called Wanderer which basically allows you to pick your own abilities. In any case, your class has a table of levels from 1 to 5, and your class's Attack, Defence, Magic, Dodge, Resistance and Overcome dice at each level are listed on the table, as well as the names of the abilities given to your class. The class also gives you a number of hit points each level.

    As an example, the mage's class table:

    Level Atk Def Mag Dod Res Ovr Special
    1 1 2 3 2 1 3 Spells (4 Novice)
    2 1 3 4 3 1 4 Spells (4 Novice)
    3 2 3 4 3 2 4 Spells (3 Novice 1 Apprentice)
    4 2 4 5 4 2 5 Spells (2 Novice 2 Apprentice)
    5 3 4 6 4 3 6 Spells (1 Novice 2 Apprentice 1 Scholar)

    You can see a few things from the mage: The Mage has a weak attack and resistance progression (1,1,2,2,3), a moderate defence and dodge progression (2,2,3,3,4) and a strong magic and overcome progression (3,4,4,5,6). These are fairly standard progressions, though some very few classes might have other progressions such as a 0,0,0,0,0 progression for magic. You can also see that the mage is getting some spells, although you can't see from the table what those spells do; you'll need to look in the class description.

    So without further ado, here are the classes:

    The Archer
    Archers are the class for someone who wants to sit at the back line with a bow. They have a few tricks up their sleeve, but mostly need to keep out of harm's way. Archers are a fine class for a player who is getting started, so long as they are not attacked too frequently.

    As well as the 10 hit points all characters get, archers get 3 hit points per level. Archers choose 4 skills from the skill list each level. They can wield any weapon of the ranged, sidearm or unarmed category. They start with a bow or crossbow and a dagger or handaxe (Both choices are made irrespective of the other) alongside their unarmed strike. They can wear light armour and start with leather armour. Because their equipment is so expensive and they live by what they can catch, they only start with 10 wealth.

    Archers have a special shot progression and a special attack progression. These are as given on the table, and are cumulative. You can choose these from the special shot list and special attack list.

    Level Atk Def Mag Dod Res Ovr Special
    1 3 2 1 3 1 2 Special Shot (2 Simple)
    2 4 3 1 4 1 3 Special Shot (2 Simple)
    3 4 3 2 4 2 3 Special Shot (1 Simple, 1 Moderate), Special Attack (1 Basic)
    4 5 4 2 5 2 4 Special Shot (2 Moderate), Special Attack (1 Basic)
    5 6 4 3 6 3 4 Special Shot (1 Moderate, 1 Complex), Special Attack (1 Intermediate)

    The Berserker
    Berserkers are unique among melee classes: they jump into the fray without necessarily being survivable enough to get out alive! They may have decent hit points, but with no defence to speak of, a berserker will take a lot of hits. The solution, of course, is to be aggressive enough to defeat the enemies before that happens!

    A berserker doesn't take a great deal of skill to be effective, but newer players may find it hard to keep them alive.


    As well as the 10 hit points all characters get, berserkers get 4 hit points per level. They choose 3 skills from the skill list at each level. They can wield any weapon except in the magic and ranged categories. As well as their unarmed strike, berserkers carry a greatsword or a greataxe or two longswords or two battleaxes or a longsword and a battleaxe. They can't wear armour and don't start with any. They start with 30 wealth.

    Berserkers get special attacks in the progression given on the table.

    Level Atk Def Mag Dod Res Ovr Special
    1 4 1 0 1 3 2 Special Attack (2 Basic)
    2 5 1 0 1 4 3 Special Attack (2 Basic)
    3 5 2 0 2 4 3 Special Attack (1 Basic 1 Intermediate)
    4 6 2 0 2 5 4 Special Attack (1 Basic 1 Intermediate)
    5 7 3 0 3 6 4 Special Attack (1 Intermediate 1 Advanced)

    The Brawler
    Brawlers are one of the hardest classes for a new player; they rely a great deal on tactical positioning and chain attacks. When played skilfully, however, they can be devastating irrespective of equipment.

    As well as the 10 hit points all characters get, brawlers get 4 hit points per level. They choose 4 skills from the skill list at each level. They can't wield any weapons except for unarmed weapons, and only start with their unarmed strike. They can wear light armour, and start with fighting robes and 40 wealth.

    Each level, a brawler chooses a single attack chain from the correct colour (The colours are based on a particular type of ranking for Judo and will be inaccurate if your brawler practices jujutsu, wado-ryu or shotokan, irrelevant if they practice certain other eastern martial arts, and nonexistent if they practice western martial arts such as capoeira, but the techniques themselves are a mixture of many martial arts and imagination). All attacks in the chain are available to them.

    Level Atk Def Mag Dod Res Ovr Special
    1 2 3 1 2 2 2 Chain Attacks (Yellow)
    2 3 4 1 3 3 3 Chain Attacks (Yellow)
    3 3 4 2 3 3 3 Chain Attacks (Orange)
    4 4 5 2 4 4 4 Chain Attacks (Orange)
    5 4 6 3 4 4 4 Chain Attacks (Green)

    The Mage
    Magi have a large repertoire of powers which allow them to be more powerful in combat than anyone else... but come with the restriction that once you use one, it's gone! Magi can't use their most powerful spells repeatedly, so they need to use less powerful ones until the situation is just right (or desperate enough!) to use their greatest spell. Magi are therefore not highly recommended to beginners, although they'll have a while to get the hang of them.

    As well as the 10 hit points all characters get, magi get 1 hit point per level. Magi choose 2 skills from the skill list every level. Magi can wield any weapon of the magic or unarmed types. They don't start with any weapon except unarmed strike. They can't wear armour and don't start with any. They start with 50 wealth.

    At each level, a mage gets some number of spells, which are chosen from the spell list. A mage will choose 4 novice spells at 1st level, 4 more novice spells at 2nd level, 3 more novice spells and 1 apprentice spell at 3rd level, 2 more of each of novice and apprentice spells at 4th level, and 3 apprentice and 1 scholar spell at 5th level. Magi can't cast spells in armour even if they get the ability to wear it.

    Level Atk Def Mag Dod Res Ovr Special
    1 1 2 3 2 1 3 Spells (4 Novice)
    2 1 3 4 3 1 4 Spells (4 Novice)
    3 2 3 4 3 2 4 Spells (3 Novice 1 Apprentice)
    4 2 4 5 4 2 5 Spells (2 Novice 2 Apprentice)
    5 3 4 6 4 3 6 Spells (1 Novice 2 Apprentice 1 Scholar)

    The Priest
    Priests are competent fighters, and also have special abilities called prayers, which last until another prayer is activated. Priests need to consider carefully which ones are best to use in each situation, but even if they're wrong, they are capable enough fighters: an adequate choice for new players - not to mention that you use the same number of dice for most rolls!

    As well as the 10 hit points all characters get, priests get 3 hit points per level. Priests choose 3 skills from the skill list every level. Priests can wield all weapons except for 2-handed weapons, and can use medium armour, as well as shields. They start with a mace, a kite shield and a breastplate, and can like anyone else make unarmed attacks, but are expected to survive without money.

    Priests get a set of prayers each level, and also know a limited number of special attacks.

    Level Atk Def Mag Dod Res Ovr Special
    1 2 2 2 2 2 2 Prayers (2 Novitiate)
    2 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prayers (1 Novitiate), Special Attack (1 Basic)
    3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Prayers (2 Supplicant)
    4 4 4 4 4 4 4 Prayers (1 Supplicant), Special Attack (1 Intermediate)
    5 4 4 4 4 4 4 Prayers (2 Heirophant)


    The Rogue
    Rogues have a large number of different abilities, making them jacks-of-all-trades after a fashion. They have abilities which are always on, making them fairly good choices for a beginner.

    As well as the 10 hit points all characters get, rogues get 2 hit points per level. Rogues choose 8 skills from the skill list every level. Rogues can wield sidearms and start with a dagger or handaxe, as well as their unarmed strike, and 45 wealth. They can wear light armour but don't start with any.

    Each level, the rogue gets a number of talents, as given on the table.

    Level Atk Def Mag Dod Res Ovr Special
    1 2 2 2 3 1 2 Talents (2 Tricks)
    2 3 3 3 4 1 3 Talents (2 Tricks)
    3 3 3 3 4 2 3 Talents (1 Trick, 1 Gambit)
    4 4 4 4 5 2 4 Talents (2 Gambits)
    5 4 4 4 6 3 4 Talents (1 Gambit, 1 Scheme)

    The Warrior
    Warriors roll lots of dice. Locked door? Roll lots of dice at it. Want to stab some guy? Roll lots of dice at him. Sorceress trying to kill you? You guessed it, roll lots of dice at her. Warriors get a limited range of special attacks, meaning that it's pretty easy to learn your capabilities, making them a pretty good choice for a new player. On an unrelated note, taking a single warrior level for +3 to all stats except magic is both fair and legal.

    As well as the 10 hit points all characters get, warriors get 5 hit points per level. Warriors choose 3 skills from the skill list each level. Warriors can use all types of weapons, armour and shields except magic weapons, and start with a longsword and a kite shield and 20 wealth (as well as their unarmed strike).

    Level Atk Def Mag Dod Res Ovr Special
    1 3 3 0 3 3 3 Special Attack (1 Simple)
    2 4 4 0 4 4 4 Special Attack (1 Simple)
    3 4 4 0 4 4 4 Special Attack (1 Intermediate)
    4 5 5 0 5 5 5 Special Attack (1 Intermediate)
    5 6 6 0 6 6 6 Special Attack (1 Advanced)

    The Wanderer
    Wanderer is not really a class. Wanderer is what happens when you decide that you don't like the class system, or don't like any of the available classes, or want to grab bits of the different classes and see if they stick. Alternatively, a wanderer can be a decent substitute for a mage; you will know fewer spells but be more survivable and able to use any weapon you pick up.

    As well as the 10 hit points all characters get, wanderers get 3 hit points per level. They choose 5 skills from the skill list each level. Wanderers can wield all types of weapons and armour, though they can't cast spells in armour even if they know any. Wanderers can choose any combination of equipment and wealth available to another class.

    Wanderers have 12 points to split between all of their stats: The very high array is worth 4, the high array 3, the medium array 2, and the low array 1. The zero array, strangely enough, is worth zero. Our prayers go out to all the wanderers who thought that it would be a good idea to stick zeroes in defence.

    Wanderers can choose between prayers, spells, talents, special attacks, special shots and spells at each level, but the wanderer can't choose three of anything except for spells at any one level. They simply can't choose attack chains at all. On the table, "Low" means simple, basic, novice, novitiate or trick; "Medium" means moderate, intermediate, apprentice, supplicant or gambit and "High" means complex, advanced, scholar, heirophant, or scheme.

    Level V High High Med Low Zero Special
    1 4 3 2 1 0 Special Abilities (2 Low)
    2 5 4 3 1 0 Special Abilities (2 Low)
    3 5 4 3 2 0 Special Abilities (1 Low 1 Medium)
    4 6 5 4 2 0 Special Abilities (2 Medium)
    5 7 6 4 3 0 Special Abilities (1 Medium 1 High)

    Special Abilities

    Okay, so you're probably wondering what all of these skills, special shots, prayers and whatnot are. Worry not, they are listed imminently!

    Skills

    Everyone gets some number of skills. You can take a skill multiple times, and when using it, you roll a number of dice equal to the number of times you've taken it, exactly as though you were rolling one of your stats such as attack or magic. If you're told to jump 8, you need to roll a number of dice equal to the number of times you've taken jump and roll equal to or above 8. If you do, you succeed. If not, you waste your action if you're in combat. If you're told to jump some function of X, you roll the dice, and then after rolling, take the highest value of X that lets you succeed (if you want to set a maximum value of X so you don't "Over-jump", you need to make this clear before rolling). If you're told to jump 0, you succeed without needing to roll even if you have no dice in jump: the only reason that it's listed as a jump roll at all is that it is to do with the act of jumping even if it has nothing to do with the jump skill.

    The skills don't have ranks (Like Yellow, Scholar, Trick, and so forth) so anyone can take any skill if they have the points to do so.

    The skills are as follows:

    Climb: Climb 0: Climb a ladder or other surface designed for climbing, Climb 4: Climb a rope, Climb 8: Climb a rough surface, Climb 12: Climb a cliff face or equivalent, Climb 16: Climb a flat surface.
    Disable: Disable a number equal to an obstacle's disable difficulty: Disable an object.
    Disguise: Disguise X: Disguise from enemies who can't Identify X.
    Identify: Identify a number equal to the enemy attack or magic roll: You know the name and effect of the ability used. If they didn't roll, Identify 5 times the ability's rank instead.
    Initiative: Initiative X: Go before anyone who can't initiative X in combat. If you equal someone's initiative, randomly determine who goes first.
    Jump: Jump 0: Jump up to 5 ft forwards or 1 up, Jump X: Jump X+5 ft forwards, Jump 4X: Jump X+1 ft up.
    Locate: Takes no actions. Locate X: Find enemies who are stealthing X or less.
    Stealth: Stealth X: Hide from enemies who can't locate X.
    Swim: Swim 4: Stay afloat in water, Swim 8: Move in water, Swim 12: Act in water, Swim 16: Act and move in water.

    Special Shots

    Archers use special shots to attack from range. There is no limit to how often they can be used. You need to use them during the same action that you use a ranged weapon, such as a bow or a crossbow, unless specified (distraction and suppressing fire are counterexamples) and you need to hit for the effect to work. They usually modify your attack.

    Simple

    Cripple: Attack an enemy and they need to resist a number equal to the damage or they can't move next round (If you miss, they can't fail because they resist 0).
    Deadly Shot: Attack an enemy at -2 attack dice, but attack deals triple damage if it hits.
    Disarming Shot: Attack an enemy and they need to Dodge a number equal to your attack roll or drop their held mainhand weapon (an action is needed to pick it back up).
    Distraction: You wait a moment, and then when an enemy tries to cast a spell, you shoot straight past their head. They need to roll overcome equal to the attack roll or waste their spell but you deal no damage. If no-one tries to cast a spell in that time, you waste your action.
    Point-blank shot: You shoot inside your weapon's minimum range.
    Quick Shot: Fire twice, but -1 attack die on each shot and must both be at same target.

    Moderate:

    Bolt to the Wall: Attack an enemy. If they're within 5 feet of a wall, and are between the wall and you, they need to resist a number equal to the damage dealt +5 or they can't move or act next round.
    Longshot: You attack an enemy up to double your weapon's range away.
    Mindshot: Attack an enemy and they need to overcome a number equal to the damage or they lose a random spell as though they'd cast it.
    Suppressing fire: Attack each enemy in range that moves until your next turn.
    Volley: Attack each enemy in a 15 foot radius circle.

    Complex:

    Lockbreaker Arrow: Make a disable check within your weapon's maximum range.
    Poison Arrow: Attack an enemy. They resist 30 or take extra damage equal to the amount they failed by.
    Unload: Shoot until you miss.

    Special Attacks

    Special attacks are usually modifiers to an attack with one or two melee weapons (sidearm, one-handed or two-handed) and require you to hit for them to work. Where this is not the case it is clearly indicated. They can be used indefinitely.

    Basic

    Cleave: Attack all enemies in range within a 90 degree arc.
    Feint: Not an attack modifier; instead whenever you roll defend, dodge, resist or overcome until your next turn, roll attack as well and add them.
    Go for the Throat: Drop your one-handed or two-handed weapon and your shield (if any), draw a sidearm and attack with it as part of the same action. The attack deals triple damage if it hits, but whether it hits or misses the enemy (and other enemies who saw what you did) won't fall for the same trick again in the next minute.
    Hurl weapon: Use weapon as though it had a range of 40 feet, but you lose it.
    Injure: Weapon attack deals half damage but enemy must resist a number equal to the original damage roll (before halving) or you choose one of their stats (such as attack or magic, but not hide or swim - those are skills) and reduce it by 1 for 2d6 rounds.
    Knockback: Attack and if you hit, knock the enemy 5 feet directly away from you.
    Shield Bash: Attack with your weapon, and then attack with your shield to deal d6 damage, plus the shield's damage reduction.

    Intermediate

    All-out Assault: Attack, rolling attack+defend to hit. You lose your defend dice until your next turn.
    Headslam: Attack, and enemy resists a number equal to the damage dealt or can't act next turn.
    Knockdown: Attack and if you hit, knock the enemy 10 feet directly away from you and reduce their speed by 5 feet next turn.
    Twinstrike: Attack twice at no penalty.
    Whirlwind of Iron: Attack all enemies in range.

    Advanced

    Coup de Grace: Attack and enemy resists half the damage or dies.
    Hurl Enemy: Attack unarmed. If you hit, enemy must resist 20+your level or you attack with enemy as a ranged weapon, range 20, damage 2d6+attack.
    Tornado of Steel: Takes up your move as well as your action. Move, and attack any enemy who was ever in your attack range during this action.

    Chain Attacks

    For each chain attack you can take (usually one per level), you can take the entire chain of attacks. To make a second attack of a chain, you need to have just made the first of any chain; to make the third, you must have made the second of any chain, and so forth. Often, a chain is missing some of its early attacks, so you need to make the earlier attacks from another chain.

    If a chain refers to "Keeping the chain going", this means making a chain attack every round without going back to the first attack of a chain.

    In general, a chain attack can have an effect on you (such as brace/block/parry's effect) but not on your enemy (such as grab/pummel/throw) if it misses. If you miss with the attack, the chain ends, though.

    Yellow

    Brace/Block/Parry Make an unarmed attack and add 1 to your defence until your next turn/Make an unarmed attack and add 2 to your defence until your next turn/Make an unarmed attack and add 3 to your defence until your next turn.
    Check/Check/Check/... Make an unarmed attack. You can use this to keep a chain going up to 11. You're welcome.
    Grab/Pummel/Throw: Make an unarmed attack. Enemy must resist a number equal to your attack roll or is grabbed, and can't move as long as you keep the chain going./Make an unarmed attack. The damage is doubled against grabbed enemies./Throw an enemy 10 feet away. If they aren't grabbed they get to resist X, where X is an attack roll you make to provide the difficulty.
    Push/Shove/Slam: Make an unarmed attack. The enemy takes no damage but is moved 5 feet back./Make an unarmed attack. The enemy takes no damage but is moved 10 feet back./Make an unarmed attack. The enemy takes no damage but is moved 20 feet back.

    Orange:

    Bolt/Spear/Lance: Make an unarmed attack with a range of 40 feet/Make an unarmed attack with a range of 60 feet/Make an unarmed attack with a range of 80 feet.
    -/Smash/Crash/Burn: Make an unarmed attack and it does 1.5 times damage (round down)/Make an unarmed attack and it does double damage/Make an unarmed attack and your opponent takes 1d6 damage each round you keep the chain going.
    -/-/Snatch/Steal: Make an unarmed attack and opponent must dodge a number equal to the attack roll or drop their weapon and need an action to recover it/Make an unarmed attack and either grab a weapon on the ground, or opponent must dodge a number equal to their attack roll or you take one of their weapons.

    Green:

    -/Double/Triple/Quadruple/Quintuple: Make two unarmed attacks/Make three unarmed attacks/Make four unarmed attacks/Make five unarmed attacks.
    -/Lunge/Dash/Sprint/Chase: Move 20 feet and attack/Move 40 feet and attack/Move 60 feet and attack/Move 80 feet and attack.
    -/-/-/-/-/Despair/Die: Make an unarmed attack and mark an opponent for death/Make an unarmed attack which kills the opponent who is marked for death if it hits them.

    Spells

    Spells are pretty simple: They don't modify an attack and all the rules for using them are in their description. "Cooldown X" means "Once you use this spell, you can't use it for X rounds" unless the spell's cooldown is listed in some other length of time (a round is 6 seconds). You can research a duplicate copy of the spell so that you can use one while the other cools down.

    Novice

    Firebolt: Roll magic against defence of an enemy within 100 feet. If you succeed, deal 1d6 damage plus your magic stat. Cooldown 1.
    Minor Healing: Restore 1d6 health, plus your magic stat, to a creature within 30 feet. Cooldown 10+1d6 minutes.
    Shield: Gain a shield with "Reduce all damage you take by 3" for a number of rounds equal to twice your magic. You can wield it but it takes up a hand. Cooldown 1d6 minutes.
    Summon I: Summon a creature with health 10, all stats 1, and no skills for a number of rounds equal to twice your magic or until it dies. Summon into a space within 20 feet. Cooldown 1d6 minutes.
    Telekinesis: Pick an object within 100 feet and move it up to 20 feet, even into a creature's possession if they want to take it. Alternatively, you can pull a lever or make similar interactions with terrain from a distance, but only if you have enough strength to. You can't pick up living beings like this. Cooldown 1d6.

    Apprentice

    Ignition: Roll magic against resist of an enemy within 100 feet. If you succeed, deal 1d6 damage per round for a number of rounds equal to your magic stat.
    Magic Clash: Choose an enemy that can cast spells within 100 feet. That enemy overcomes X, where X is your magic roll, or 1d3 of their spells go on cooldown.
    Moderate Healing: Restore 2d6 health, plus twice your magic stat, to a creature within 30 feet. Cooldown 20+2d6 minutes.
    Summon II: Summon a creature with health 20, all stats 2, and no skills for a number of rounds equal to twice your magic or until it dies. Summon into a space within 20 feet. Cooldown 2d6 minutes.

    Scholar

    Healing: Restore 3d6 health, plus twice your magic stat, to a creature within 30 feet. Cooldown 30+3d6 minutes.
    Fireball: Choose a point within 100 feet. Each creature within 20 feet of it must dodge 20 plus your magic stat or take 1d6 damage for each point of magic you have. Cooldown 1d6
    Summon III: Summon a creature with health 30, all stats 3, and no skills for a number of rounds equal to twice your magic or until it dies. Summon into a space within 20 feet. Cooldown 3d6 minutes.
    Twincast: Cast two apprentice or novice spells immediately. Cooldown 3d6.


    Prayers

    Prayers are passive abilities, so you don't have to spend actions on them. You can only have one prayer active at a time.

    Novitiate:

    Godspeed: You move 30 feet, or 120 feet if you're not acting.
    Guide my Hand: When you roll attack, you get a +1 bonus to each attack die.
    Lend me your Skill: When you roll any skill, you get a +1 bonus to each skill die.
    Let them Fall Before Me: Your attacks deal extra damage equal to your magic stat.
    Shield me from Harm: Reduce all damage you take by 1 per point of magic you have.
    Smite my Foes: Each round, roll magic against the dodge of an enemy within 50 feet. If you succeed, deal damage to them equal to your magic stat.

    Supplicant:

    Destroy the Enemy: Whenever you knock an enemy unconscious, kill them.
    Give me your Strength: Get +1 die on all stats.
    Let me Teach them: Whenever an ally rolls, if you have a higher value in that stat or skill, they gain +1 die to the roll.
    Sustain me: You gain a single hit point every minute.

    Heirophant

    Bring us Together: Each round, you can choose any number of allies within 100 feet and move them up to 20 feet straight towards you.
    Ignite my Foes: Each round, each enemy within 100 feet takes 1d6 points of damage.
    Save me: If you die, you are restored to life at full hit points but can't use any prayers for the rest of the day.

    Talents

    Talents are special abilities that you simply have. You don't need to activate them, they simply do something. Unlike prayers, all your talents are always active.

    Tricks

    Against All Odds: You get a +1 to attack and defence for every enemy in your melee range beyond the first, maximum +2.
    Dabbler: You can use magic weapons.
    Grab: Whenever an enemy drops their weapon within 5 feet of you, you can grab it.
    Quick Draw: You can freely draw one weapon and put away one weapon per round.
    Sneak Attack: You deal 1d6 extra damage to an enemy whenever you attack it if it wasn't aware of your presence.
    Trap Dodger: You get +2 defence and dodge against traps.

    Gambits

    Get the Hell Out of Dodge: When you don't take an action, you can move twice as far as normal (usually 160 feet).
    Riposte: If an enemy misses you with a melee attack, you get a single attack with one weapon back against them.
    Roll Back: If an enemy hits you, you can move 5 feet away from them after they've finished their whole attack. You can stack multiple uses to move further.
    Sniper: You can make ranged weapon attacks at double range.

    Schemes

    Shadow Strike: You deal 1d6 extra damage to an enemy whenever you attack it if it wasn't aware of your presence. This stacks with sneak attack, because it would be completely pointless if it didn't.
    Second Chance: Whenever you fail to resist, dodge or overcome something with a duration, you can attempt to end it again each round of its duration.



    Spoiler: Levels of ability.
    Show
    Simple, Moderate, Complex, Superior, Intricate, Masterwork
    Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Extraordinary, Epic, Ultimate
    Yellow, Orange, Green, Blue, Brown, Black
    Novice, Apprentice, Scholar, Arcanist, Sorcerer, Archmage
    Novitiate, Supplicant, Heirophant, Apotheosis, Saint, Avatar
    Trick, Gambit, Scheme, Tactic, Schenanigan, Stratagem
    Low, Medium, High, Great, Epic, Maximal
    Last edited by Jormengand; 2016-05-09 at 04:59 PM.

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Pixie in the Playground
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    Default Re: CORPS: Content-only Role-playing System.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jormengand View Post
    So, imagine you're playing a role-playing system, and someone rushes up to their opponent and starts grappling them. Oh, wow, you've never used the grappling rules before. Come to think of it, you can't remember them. Either you break out the book, trawl through page-long grapple rules, and confuse everyone, or you make something up on the fly. Someone, somewhere will probably trip over the character creation rules; people will forget obscure rules unless they've just been reading about them and have decided to take advantage of them, and so forth.

    So let's get rid of the rules. Let's just have content. Abilities. Things you can do.
    Eventually, won't this just be every other system, but with the issue of "you don't have the grapple ability, so you can't do that"? there are also a lot of rules listed after "let's get rid of the rules"... there's nothing wrong with simplifying a system, but remember people like having "realistic" options... a simpler/more streamlined ruleset that handles grappling like everything else (hence not as forgettable) may be more what you're looking for than "you can only do this list of things".

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    Default Re: CORPS: Content-only Role-playing System.

    Quote Originally Posted by EpicFetus View Post
    Eventually, won't this just be every other system, but with the issue of "you don't have the grapple ability, so you can't do that"? there are also a lot of rules listed after "let's get rid of the rules"... there's nothing wrong with simplifying a system, but remember people like having "realistic" options... a simpler/more streamlined ruleset that handles grappling like everything else (hence not as forgettable) may be more what you're looking for than "you can only do this list of things".
    There are 6 rules, and they're not hard to remember. One of them is literally the initiative rule. In fact, I could arguably get rid of that rule because it's literally written in the initiative skill.

    I've tried to make the abilities simple. The longest single ability is probably Go For the Throat, and it's not hard to resolve: drop your stuff, draw a sidearm, stab someone, you deal triple damage, and you can't use the same attack on anyone who saw you.

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    Pixie in the Playground
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    Default Re: CORPS: Content-only Role-playing System.

    Hi,

    Have you ever tried this?

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    GreatWyrmGold's Avatar

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    Default Re: CORPS: Content-only Role-playing System.

    If you want a minimalist level-based system (and it looks like the OP does), this is perfectly serviceable. But I can't say that I've ever really understood the point of minimalist systems (whether they're homebrewed systems or commercial ones like FATE). Most of them tend to have at least two or three times what I've felt is the actual bare minimum for a roleplaying system (an RNG, some way of adjusting difficulty, and a place to put special traits), but without enough there to "justify" their existence. E.g, what does this system do that justifies me bookmarking it and bringing it up for later use, rather than throwing something together on my own?
    There are exceptions. Roll to Dodge is a minimalist system that, if anything, goes too far in the opposite direction (many RtD games I've seen have tacked on some way of adjusting difficulty and a place to put special traits, to varying levels of success); its purpose is obvious. On the other hand, All Outta Bubblegum has an additional mechanic tied to RNG which creates a dynamic where "actions which do not fall under the broad category of 'kicking ass'" (their words) are common and easy early on, but where characters eventually devolve into "nearly unstoppable balls of bubblegum-less fury" who can't even open doors without kicking their asses, encouraging creative setups followed by action-movie nonsense.

    This is, of course, a matter of personal taste and game design philosophy more than actual quality. I can't say how the OP's system would play, obviously, but it looks fine. A bit generic, but that's presumably the intent. I won't fault them for making it (I've made some minimalist game systems myself), but there's nothing interesting enough in the rules to make me want to play it, because there just aren't that many rules in the first place...and the rules that are there are trying to make a simplified version of pre-existing games rather than trying to make something new.
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    Ah, thank you very much GreatWyrmGold, you obviously live up to that name with your intelligence and wisdom with that post.
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