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Thread: D&D bucket list

  1. - Top - End - #31
    Pixie in the Playground
     
    DwarfFighterGirl

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    * DM a game.
    * Play all the character concepts I have floating around in my head.

  2. - Top - End - #32
    Halfling in the Playground
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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    Play a sun soul monk.

    Play a winged tiefling.

    Jump on a dragons back and turn the tide of battle.

    Own a airship.

    Have a t-rex companion.

    Play a irl game.

  3. - Top - End - #33
    Ogre in the Playground
     
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeerMug Paladin View Post
    I had a similar reaction to seeing the movie. The movie suffers heavily from the fact that many people quote its punchlines endlessly in certain contexts. Anyone who's likely to find something funny won't find it funny if they've already heard the joke 30+ times out of context before their initial viewing. Plus I just don't find MP funny. At all.

    On the topic of the thread, here's a couple.

    Run a character whose backstory/goals matters to the direction of a complete story arc.

    As a DM, run a campaign that takes place in a time loop.
    Kind of like (Warning: TVTropes link ahead) Seinfeld is Unfunny syndrome?
    Quote Originally Posted by Honest Tiefling View Post
    Is this a good OJEBUWIP WHAT IN THE NINE ABYSSES, or a bad OJFBUEWIP WHAT IN THE NINE ABYSSES?
    Quote Originally Posted by Kid Jake View Post
    "Oh no, I'm bleeding out of my eyes...it's only now that I see that the delivery fee isn't a substitute for tipping your pizza guy!"
    Quote Originally Posted by Arguss View Post
    "No" means "yes".
    Quote Originally Posted by daremetoidareyo View Post
    My other idea was to be a troglodyte were-cockroach and just smell bad in people's squares.

  4. - Top - End - #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vrock_Summoner View Post
    Actually run a game in my Incarnum setting.

    why doesn't anyone else love Incarnum
    Are you James Wyatt?
    If I can play a PC that resembles Leiber's Fafhrd or the Gray Mouser than I'd be happy to give it a try otherwise:
    1) It's 3.5, and 3.5 gives me options fatigue.
    2) It looks to be focused on Spell-casters. I'm not really into the complexities of Spell-casting, and I really hated the old psionics rules from 70's DnD and any time I read the words "alternate magic system", I suspect a headache will come soon.
    3) Well it's still fun when taken to action movie ridiculousness, I'm not into PC superpowers. I prefer playing PC''s who do things like climb walls, pick locks, and swing swords. I actually like the "magic system" of all but the 4th edition of the (King Arthur) Pendragon RPG, which just listed "tropes" for the NPC's, the PC''s being largely non spell casting knights.
    4) It's just plain hard for me to memorize new rules. I can remember the DnD rules I studied in 1978 & '79, the Call of Cthullu rules from 1981, and the Pendragon rules from 1985, but only some of 2014's 5e DnD rules. Of the dozen plus other RPG's I've read and/or played since 1978, I retain very little.
    If the DM, thev rules, and the setting allow me to just role-play (or "roll" play) a PCwhile being largely ignorant of RAW then great (you see....., what do you do, as opposed to, "what skill do you use for your roll)!
    But a magic-user based campaign looks like I would need to better retain RAW, and even if I could, frankly knowing the "magic system", of the world the DM describesn just makes the world seem less magical.
    My favorite PC's wield swords, and my favorite settings are:
    1) Swords and Sorcery (Stormbringer)
    2) Arthurian
    3) Swashbuckling (3 Musketeers/Pirates)
    4) Gaslamp Fantasy/Steampunk. ala Castle Falkenstein and Space 1889.
    Please tell me how Incarnum compares.
    Thanks
    Grim specter of noogie hangs like shroud over us all


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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJ View Post
    Does the game you play feature a Dragon sitting on a pile of treasure, in a Dungeon?
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  5. - Top - End - #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2D8HP View Post
    Are you James Wyatt?
    If only. Maybe then I could find players.

    Please tell me how Incarnum compares.
    I live to please.

    If I can play a PC that resembles Leiber's Fafhrd or the Gray Mouser than I'd be happy to give it a try
    Very similar, though not exactly identical in the Gray Mouser's case. There are a couple of specific tricks the Gray Mouser can do with his arcane talents that wouldn't transfer over exactly. But in terms of the kind of character? Definitely.

    otherwise:
    May as well tackle your other concerns.

    1) It's 3.5, and 3.5 gives me options fatigue.
    Since it's focused almost completely on the options in one book (Magic of Incarnum), it's quite a bit less options fatigue-y than most 3.5 games. But it's still 3.5.

    2) It looks to be focused on Spell-casters. I'm not really into the complexities of Spell-casting, and I really hated the old psionics rules from 70's DnD and any time I read the words "alternate magic system", I suspect a headache will come soon.
    No headaches, and much, much simpler than spell casters. Still a little more complex than pure melee, but unless Barbarian Rage is already a difficult amount of bookkeeping for you, it probably won't cause any problems.

    3) Well it's still fun when taken to action movie ridiculousness, I'm not into PC superpowers. I prefer playing PC''s who do things like climb walls, pick locks, and swing swords. I actually like the "magic system" of all but the 4th edition of the (King Arthur) Pendragon RPG, which just listed "tropes" for the NPC's, the PC''s being largely non spell casting knights.
    Incarnum is relatively mundane as far as supernatural abilities go. It isn't about calling overt magical effects; instead, it's about creating items that give you some special abilities, a lot of which are just enhancements to stuff you can already do. Like creating a visor that gives you a bonus to spotting things.

    4) It's just plain hard for me to memorize new rules. I can remember the DnD rules I studied in 1978 & '79, the Call of Cthullu rules from 1981, and the Pendragon rules from 1985, but only some of 2014's 5e DnD rules. Of the dozen plus other RPG's I've read and/or played since 1978, I retain very little.
    The rules are very easy to keep track of. Similar to what I said above - unless "how many times can I rage today?" was already too complicated, you won't have much issue keeping up with Incarnum.

    If the DM, thev rules, and the setting allow me to just role-play (or "roll" play) a PCwhile being largely ignorant of RAW then great (you see....., what do you do, as opposed to, "what skill do you use for your roll)!
    This is DM-dependent and really has nothing to do with the setting or rules.

    But yes, I'd generally be willing to accommodate a less mechanics-attentive player and let them play by ear. I'd just make use of their sheet's info to figure out how well they do stuff myself if the player didn't want to keep track of it all.

    But a magic-user based campaign looks like I would need to better retain RAW, and even if I could, frankly knowing the "magic system", of the world the DM describesn just makes the world seem less magical.
    They aren't exactly magic-users as you'd understand it. For the most part, they just create some enhancing equipment at the beginning of the day for some nifty abilities and keep using them all day. And while there are mechanically understandable elements to Incarnum, there are also many, many mysteries to it to keep it interesting and mysterious to the players.

    My favorite PC's wield swords
    Sure! Pick your favorite method - wield a normal sword and channel the guidance of your ancestors to wield it like a champ, or take it up a notch and create your own spirit weapon? Incarnum-users aren't "spell casters" in the typical sense - they're warriors, thieves, sages, people of many potential professions and lifestyles, who empower themselves by projecting their own souls as equipment and commune with other souls to help them do things.

    and my favorite settings are:
    1) Swords and Sorcery (Stormbringer)
    I'm unfamiliar. Sorry.

    2) Arthurian
    Certainly. Excalibur as a bound weapon, play Arthur himself. Or play other characters as holy knight types with only minor skill-boosting and smiting abilities. Works in the rules anyway, and works with a couple of the countries in my world (though not so much in others, there's a huge variety of cultures and some don't work with his framework).

    3) Swashbuckling (3 Musketeers/Pirates)
    See above. It works in some places. Just play a mundane character, or one who uses Incarnum to boost their swashbuckling skills and provide some nifty thematic tricks.

    4) Gaslamp Fantasy/Steampunk. ala Castle Falkenstein and Space 1889.
    None of the cultures in my setting are steampunk, but it would be a relatively minor fluff change for the game rules themselves.

    Thanks
    Y'welcome.
    Last edited by Vrock_Summoner; 2016-08-28 at 02:49 AM.

  6. - Top - End - #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vrock_Summoner View Post
    Actually run a game in my Incarnum setting.

    why doesn't anyone else love Incarnum
    Not really my style. I favor sword and sorcery grounded stuff and incarnum mostly plays around with wacky-cool kinda-magic.

    I played in a game that used incarnum, and mostly it was dudes with a constantly changing set of haunted/possessed masks. I'm sure there are models for simple sword use, but... A certain amount of the "sword and sorcery" power fantasy is the idea of the mundane triumphing over the unknown. A guy doesn't win a duel because of fused-ancestor-weapon stuff, but because they've got the nerve, the wits, and the training. Fluff matters as far as these things go.

    Plus, and this is just a personal thing, I find I play more creatively when my character doesn't have magic. With magic, I see a lot of "all you have is a hammer" thinking. With a non-magic character, I'm forced to engage with the metaphor more fully instead of paging through my 300 mechanical options.
    Last edited by Dr paradox; 2016-08-28 at 04:39 AM.

  7. - Top - End - #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2D8HP View Post
    2) Arthurian
    Play Pendragon.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2D8HP View Post
    3) Swashbuckling (3 Musketeers/Pirates)
    Play Flashing Blades.

  8. - Top - End - #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay R View Post
    Play Pendragon.
    I'm still hoping to, but I haven't ever found a table in over 30 years!
    Play Flashing Blades.
    Same problem but I've only had this game for a year (The Ambassador's Tales campaign looks AWESOME! BTW).
    Quote Originally Posted by Vrock_Summoner View Post
    But yes, I'd generally be willing to accommodate a less mechanics-attentive player and let them play by ear. I'd just make use of their sheet's info to figure out how well they do stuff myself if the player didn't want to keep track of it all.........
    .. And while there are mechanically understandable elements to Incarnum, there are also many, many mysteries to it to keep it interesting and mysterious to the players.....
    Hand me a pre-gen, I'm sold!
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJ View Post
    Does the game you play feature a Dragon sitting on a pile of treasure, in a Dungeon?
    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja_Prawn View Post
    You're an NPC stat block."I remember when your race was your class you damned whippersnappers"
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  9. - Top - End - #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr paradox View Post
    Not really my style. I favor sword and sorcery grounded stuff and incarnum mostly plays around with wacky-cool kinda-magic.
    ... Kinda? I could definitely see myself running a Sword & Sorcery style game with Incarnum if I kept the level low (in D&D terms, sword and sorcery gameplay falls apart at higher levels no matter how mundane you are, but Incarnum doesn't really ruin it at low levels).

    I played in a game that used incarnum, and mostly it was dudes with a constantly changing set of haunted/possessed masks.
    ... Huh? That sounds like home brew, specifically, and not really how it works in general.

    I'm sure there are models for simple sword use, but... A certain amount of the "sword and sorcery" power fantasy is the idea of the mundane triumphing over the unknown. A guy doesn't win a duel because of fused-ancestor-weapon stuff, but because they've got the nerve, the wits, and the training. Fluff matters as far as these things go.
    For the record, mundane characters exist in that setting. It's Incarnum-focused because Incarnum replaces all other kinds of magic, not because everyone necessarily has it. And since Incarnum only typically gives you 2-3 very narrow and typically minor abilities within the "sword and sorcery" range of levels, there's still the level of creative lateral thinking required to overcome challenges. If you've got a warrior medic whose only abilities are "create an above-average weapon," "transfer others' wounds to myself occasionally," and "see really well, especially in the dark," they have a couple of nifty tools, but they all come off as personally-trained abilities, and they hardly obviate the need for nerve, wits, and training, they just give the character a couple of extra avenues to channel those traits.

    Plus, and this is just a personal thing, I find I play more creatively when my character doesn't have magic. With magic, I see a lot of "all you have is a hammer" thinking. With a non-magic character, I'm forced to engage with the metaphor more fully instead of paging through my 300 mechanical options.
    See above more typical Incarnum character - you have two or three options, none of which are blanket situation solvers. A couple of them do mitigate some problems, such as the visor reducing the penalty of being in the dark, but that's similar both mechanically and fluff-wise to a character who uses a feat or whatever to train themselves to function better in the dark. Unless you're opposed to individual characters being able to differentiate themselves with a couple of fairly minor advantages, I can't see what the issue would be.

    Incarnum does get strong enough to clash with these concepts at high-levels, sure, but you could strip all the player-accessible magic from D&D and they'd still be inappropriate as sword and sorcery heroes by level 7, so that's more a matter of D&D having a wider range of power levels than your typical sword and sorcery story, rather than being a problem with Incarnum.

  10. - Top - End - #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vrock_Summoner View Post
    ... Kinda? I could definitely see myself running a Sword & Sorcery style game with Incarnum if I kept the level low (in D&D terms, sword and sorcery gameplay falls apart at higher levels no matter how mundane you are, but Incarnum doesn't really ruin it at low levels)........
    Incarnum does get strong enough to clash with these concepts at high-levels, sure, but you could strip all the player-accessible magic from D&D and they'd still be inappropriate as sword and sorcery heroes by level 7, so that's more a matter of D&D having a wider range of power levels than your typical sword and sorcery story, rather than being a problem with Incarnum.
    Quite true, high level and low level D&D play are not the same.
    Recently this Forum has had threads by those who don't like high levels:
    Why do almost all editions of D&D fall apart around 10th level
    Those who like high level "Naruto/Wuxia"" style adventures, and prefer 3.5 because of that:
    Sell me on 5th edition
    And those that simply hate low levels
    Roleplaying level one
    I think it's a strength that D&D can accommodate different power levels, but if players & DM's enjoy those different levels is another matter.
    While going "Dragonslaying" has appeal, I (for example) usually retire PC''s at around 5th level, others may start at even higher levels. To each their own, but it may be a more noticible problem now because (at least with 5e) PC's level up much faster than they used to! This makes the transition from low to high levels harder to acclimate to. IIRC it used to take at least three times as much "table-time" to "level up", as it used to. But don't just take my word for it, let's see what a co-creator of D&D wrote about level progression:
    Quote Originally Posted by April 1976 issue of the Strategic Review

    D&D IS ONLY AS

    GOOD AS THE DM

    by Gary Gygax

    Successful play of D & D is a blend of desire, skill and luck. Desire is often
    initiated by actually participating in a game. It is absolutely a reflection of the
    referee’s ability to maintain an interesting and challenging game. Skill is a blend
    of knowledge of the rules and game background as applied to the particular game
    circumstances favored by the referee. Memory or recall is often a skill function.
    Luck is the least important of the three, but it is a factor in successful play
    nonetheless. Using the above criteria it would seem that players who have attained
    a score or more of levels in their respective campaigns are successful indeed. This
    is generally quite untrue. Usually such meteoric rise simply reflects an in-
    competent Dungeonmaster.
    While adventurers in a D & D campaign must grade their play to their
    referee, it is also incumbent upon the Dungeonmaster to suit his campaign to the
    participants. This interaction is absolutely necessary if the campaign is to con-
    tinue to be of interest to all parties. It is often a temptation to the referee to turn
    his dungeons into a veritable gift shoppe of magical goodies, ripe for plucking by
    his players. Similarly, by a bit of fudging, outdoor expeditions become trips to the
    welfare department for heaps of loot. Monsters exist for the slaying of the ad-
    venturers — whether of the sort who “guard” treasure, or of the wandering
    variety. Experience points are heaped upon the undeserving heads of players,
    levels accumulate like dead leaves in autumn, and if players with standings in the
    20’s, 30’s and 40’s of levels do not become bored, they typically become filled with
    an entirely false sense of accomplishment, they are puffed up with hubris. As they
    have not really earned their standings, and their actual ability has no reflection on
    their campaign level, they are easily deflated (killed) in a game which demands
    competence in proportionate measure to players’ levels.
    It is, therefore, time that referees reconsider their judging. First, is magic ac-
    tually quite scarce in your dungeons? It should be! Likewise, treasures should be
    proportionate both to the levels of the dungeon and the monsters guarding them.
    Second, absolute disinterest must be exercised by the Dungeonmaster, and if a
    favorite player stupidly puts himself into a situation where he is about to be killed,
    let the dice tell the story and KILL him. This is not to say that you should never
    temper chance with a bit of “Divine Intervention,” but helping players should be a
    rare act on the referee’s part, and the action should only be taken when fate seems
    to have unjustly condemned an otherwise good player, and then not in every cir-
    cumstance should the referee intervene. Third, create personas for the inhabitants
    of your dungeon — if they are intelligent they would act cleverly to preserve them-
    selves and slay intruding expeditions out to do them in and steal their treasures.
    The same is true for wandering monsters. Fourth, there should be some high-level,
    very tricky and clever chaps in the nearest inhabitation to the dungeon, folks who
    skin adventures out of their wealth just as prospectors were generally fleeced for
    their gold in the Old West. When the campaign turkies flock to town trying to buy
    magical weapons, potions, scrolls, various other items of magical nature, get a
    chum turned back to flesh, have a corpse resurrected, or whatever, make them pay
    through their proverbial noses. For example, what would a player charge for like
    items or services? Find out, add a good bit, and that is the cost you as referee will
    make your personas charge. This will certainly be entertaining to you, and laying
    little traps in addition will keep the players on their collective toes. After all,Dungeonmasters are entitled to a little fun too! Another point to remember is that
    you should keep a strict account of time. The wizard who spends six months
    writing scrolls and enchanting items is OUT of the campaign for six months, he
    cannot play during these six game months, and if the time system is anywhere
    reflective of the proper scale that means a period of actual time in the neigh-
    borhood of three months. That will pretty well eliminate all that sort of
    foolishness. Ingredients for scroll writing and potion making should also be
    stipulated (we will treat this in an upcoming issue of SR or in a D & D supplement
    as it should be dealt with at length) so that it is no easy task to prepare scrolls or
    duplicate potions.
    When players no longer have reams of goodies at their fingertips they must
    use their abilities instead, and as you will have made your dungeons and wilder-
    nesses far more difficult and demanding, it will require considerable skill,
    imagination, and intellectual exercise to actually gain from the course of an ad-
    venture. Furthermore, when magic is rare it is valuable, and only if it is scarce
    will there be real interest in seeking it. When it is difficult to survive, a long
    process to gain levels, when there are many desired items of magical nature to seek
    for, then a campaign is interesting and challenging. Think about how much fun it
    is to have something handed to you on a silver platter — nice once in a while but
    unappreciated when it becomes common occurrence. This analogy applies to ex-
    perience and treasure in the D & D campaign.
    It requires no careful study to determine that D & D is aimed at progression
    which is geared to the approach noted above. There are no monsters to challenge
    the capabilities of 30th level lords, 40th level patriarchs, and so on. Now I know of
    the games played at CalTech where the rules have been expanded and changed to
    reflect incredibly high levels, comic book characters and spells, and so on. Okay.
    Different strokes for different folks, but that is not D & D. While D & D is pretty
    flexible, that sort of thing stretches it too far, and the boys out there are playing
    something entirely different — perhaps their own name “Dungeons & Beavers,”
    tells it best. It is reasonable to calculate that if a fair player takes part in 50 to 75
    games in the course of a year he should acquire sufficient experience points to
    make him about 9th to 11th level, assuming that he manages to survive all that
    play. The acquisition of successively higher levels will be proportionate to enhanced
    power and the number of experience points necessary to attain them, so another
    year of play will by no means mean a doubling of levels but rather the addition of
    perhaps two or three levels. Using this gauge, it should take four or five years to
    see 20th level. As BLACKMOOR is the only campaign with a life of five years, and
    GREYHAWK with a life of four is the second longest running campaign, the most
    able adventurers should not yet have attained 20th level except in the two named
    campaigns. To my certain knowledge no player in either BLACKMOOR or
    GREYHAWK has risen above 14th level.
    By requiring players to work for experience, to earn their treasure, means that
    the opportunity to retain interest will remain. It will also mean that the rules will
    fit the existing situation, a dragon, balrog, or whatever will be a fearsome
    challenge rather than a pushover. It is still up to the Dungeonmaster to make the
    campaign really interesting to his players by adding imaginative touches, through
    exertion to develop background and detailed data regarding the campaign, and to
    make certain that there is always something new and exciting to learn about or
    acquire. It will, however, be an easier task. So if a 33rd level wizard reflects a
    poorly managed campaign, a continuing mortality rate of 50% per expedition
    generally reflects over-reaction and likewise a poorly managed campaign. It is
    unreasonable to place three blue dragons on the first dungeon level, just as
    unreasonable as it is to allow a 10th level fighter to rampage through the upper
    levels of a dungeon rousting kobolds and giant rats to gain easy loot and ex-
    perience. When you tighten up your refereeing be careful not to go too far the other way.
    Grim specter of noogie hangs like shroud over us all


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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJ View Post
    Does the game you play feature a Dragon sitting on a pile of treasure, in a Dungeon?
    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja_Prawn View Post
    You're an NPC stat block."I remember when your race was your class you damned whippersnappers"
    Snazzy Avatar by Honest Tiefling!

  11. - Top - End - #41
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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    We're actually on the same page - I was saying that D&D doesn't really do sword and sorcery style at higher levels whether or not you have Incarnum, and Incarnum doesn't make the game any less sword and sorcery appropriate at low levels.

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    - have my character snatched by some kind of shapeshifter. Play as the shapeshifter for as long as the rest of the party figures that out.

    - have a rotating table with rotating GM, that is, a shared campaign setting and "metaplot" with a rotating rooster of characters, and players taking turn in running story arcs.

  13. - Top - End - #43
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    - To play TOON. (I've run it, but not played it.)

    - To play Pendragon. (I've run it, but not played it.)

    - To play Chivalry and Sorcery with a GM who knows it well enough to run it smoothly.

    - To play a nobleman or gentleman in Flashing Blades.

    - To play D&D again (the original, with the first three supplements, Greyhawk and Blackmoor and a small amount of Eldritch Wizardry)


    But really, most of the goals on my bucket list have been accomplished.

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    I'd really like to run one of those desperate games where the world was overrun by darkness a while ago and the players have to actually go out and work proactively to make things better or more to their liking, rather than just giving them a pleasant status quo to defend.
    Call me Remedy or Celia, whichever you prefer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay R View Post
    - To play TOON. (I've run it, but not played it.)

    - To play Pendragon. (I've run it, but not played it.)

    - To play Chivalry and Sorcery with a GM who knows it well enough to run it smoothly.

    - To play a nobleman or gentleman in Flashing Blades.

    - To play D&D again (the original, with the first three supplements, Greyhawk and Blackmoor and a small amount of Eldritch Wizardry)
    Not including Toon (reading it in the store years ago was enough for me), and not including the Psionics rules from Eldrich Wizardry (I still don't get them and reading Hiero's Journey by Sterling Lanier didn't help!) I am completely in the tank on this list.
    I've wanted to play Pendragon since I bought it in 1985, Flashing Blades has been on my list just for this year, but before that it was GURPS Swashbucklers (FB looks better!), Chivalry and Sorcery was the first game the older guys in the gang tried to switch from D&D to (and quickly quit as "to hard"), and I've long been curious, but Original + has been on my list since the very minute my DM said we'd be playing Villains and Vigilantes that night instead of D&D, and got on my list again when we played Traveller, and who I'm I kidding, for every waking minute for the last 37 years thar I've not been playing D&D 9/10th of the time I would rather be in the basement playing '70's rules D&D with the old crew again (now impossible without "raise dead").
    Last edited by 2D8HP; 2016-08-30 at 08:43 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tough Butter View Post
    1. Successfully make a Monty Python and the holy grail reference and have people find it funny.
    I did this, the scene of the witch!
    Pardon me for any weird things, I have schizophrenia.

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    -Slay a dragon.

    -Successfully lay siege to Hell/The Abyss.

    -Become a living God/Demigod/God by my own hand as opposed to DM handout.

    -Play in a lvl 1-20 campaign.

    -Successfully pull one over on the DM.

    -Play a game (ANY GAME) where we start at a level higher than 1.

    -Run a horror campaign/adventure where everyone gets scared/involved.

    -Run the following games:
    --Redwall
    --Wheel of Time
    --Fallout: Equestria
    --World of Warcraft
    --The Secret of NIMH
    --A futuristic space opera
    --A futuristic space opera with World of Darkness elements

    -Run a lvl 1-20 campaign.
    Last edited by Silus; 2016-08-30 at 11:43 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remedy View Post
    I'd really like to run one of those desperate games where the world was overrun by darkness a while ago and the players have to actually go out and work proactively to make things better or more to their liking, rather than just giving them a pleasant status quo to defend.
    I'd actually like to play in a campaign like that. For a while I've wanted to play a light-hearted optimist in a dark campaign world. Specifically one that tells (unfunny) jokes to try to get smiles out of anyone. Maybe I just like the idea of playing someone that's good-natured enough to want to help people but doesn't really know how.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Belac93 View Post
    Have a character obtain godhood.
    Checked this one off, which, to my surprise, came right after checking off another Bucket list D&D item:

    Actually combat the Tarrasque.

    We were level 17 at the time, and knew this was going to be the end of the campaign. I had a plan for retiring my character afterwards, but the DM took all of us present (we were playing in Forgotten Realms) and had Ao (FR overgod) pluck our characters up and made us deities of a whole new world. Basically, the DM was switching to a homebrew world, and he let each of us, as the newly appointed deities in this world, add one thing to the world. My character, the party wizard, became the new deity of Magic.

    For my remaining bucket list items:

    -Actually level a character to 20 and retire him with an appropriate denoument, instead of the game just stopping because people could no longer get together.
    -Actually finish running Age of Worms (in progress right now).
    -Contribute something to actual, official D&D in print(have input on a rulebook, write a prestige class, etc.)

    As an aside, I'm seeing a lot of things people are wishing for that I have done, which is making me feel kind of accomplished. I've played 2e, slain dragons (as well as liches and beholders), and more.

    Here's wishing everyone good luck on their lists!
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2D8HP View Post
    Quite true, high level and low level D&D play are not the same.
    Recently this Forum has had threads by those who don't like high levels:
    Why do almost all editions of D&D fall apart around 10th level
    Those who like high level "Naruto/Wuxia"" style adventures, and prefer 3.5 because of that:
    Sell me on 5th edition
    And those that simply hate low levels
    Roleplaying level one
    I think it's a strength that D&D can accommodate different power levels, but if players & DM's enjoy those different levels is another matter.
    While going "Dragonslaying" has appeal, I (for example) usually retire PC''s at around 5th level, others may start at even higher levels. To each their own, but it may be a more noticible problem now because (at least with 5e) PC's level up much faster than they used to! This makes the transition from low to high levels harder to acclimate to. IIRC it used to take at least three times as much "table-time" to "level up", as it used to. But don't just take my word for it, let's see what a co-creator of D&D wrote about level progression:
    Quote Originally Posted by April 1976 issue of the Strategic Review
    D&D IS ONLY AS

    GOOD AS THE DM

    by Gary Gygax
    Successful play of D & D is a blend of desire, skill and luck. Desire is often
    initiated by actually participating in a game. It is absolutely a reflection of the
    referee’s ability to maintain an interesting and challenging game. Skill is a blend
    of knowledge of the rules and game background as applied to the particular game
    circumstances favored by the referee. Memory or recall is often a skill function.
    Luck is the least important of the three, but it is a factor in successful play
    nonetheless. Using the above criteria it would seem that players who have attained
    a score or more of levels in their respective campaigns are successful indeed. This
    is generally quite untrue. Usually such meteoric rise simply reflects an in-
    competent Dungeonmaster.
    While adventurers in a D & D campaign must grade their play to their
    referee, it is also incumbent upon the Dungeonmaster to suit his campaign to the
    participants. This interaction is absolutely necessary if the campaign is to con-
    tinue to be of interest to all parties. It is often a temptation to the referee to turn
    his dungeons into a veritable gift shoppe of magical goodies, ripe for plucking by
    his players. Similarly, by a bit of fudging, outdoor expeditions become trips to the
    welfare department for heaps of loot. Monsters exist for the slaying of the ad-
    venturers — whether of the sort who “guard” treasure, or of the wandering
    variety. Experience points are heaped upon the undeserving heads of players,
    levels accumulate like dead leaves in autumn, and if players with standings in the
    20’s, 30’s and 40’s of levels do not become bored, they typically become filled with
    an entirely false sense of accomplishment, they are puffed up with hubris. As they
    have not really earned their standings, and their actual ability has no reflection on
    their campaign level, they are easily deflated (killed) in a game which demands
    competence in proportionate measure to players’ levels.
    It is, therefore, time that referees reconsider their judging. First, is magic ac-
    tually quite scarce in your dungeons? It should be! Likewise, treasures should be
    proportionate both to the levels of the dungeon and the monsters guarding them.
    Second, absolute disinterest must be exercised by the Dungeonmaster, and if a
    favorite player stupidly puts himself into a situation where he is about to be killed,
    let the dice tell the story and KILL him. This is not to say that you should never
    temper chance with a bit of “Divine Intervention,” but helping players should be a
    rare act on the referee’s part, and the action should only be taken when fate seems
    to have unjustly condemned an otherwise good player, and then not in every cir-
    cumstance should the referee intervene. Third, create personas for the inhabitants
    of your dungeon — if they are intelligent they would act cleverly to preserve them-
    selves and slay intruding expeditions out to do them in and steal their treasures.
    The same is true for wandering monsters. Fourth, there should be some high-level,
    very tricky and clever chaps in the nearest inhabitation to the dungeon, folks who
    skin adventures out of their wealth just as prospectors were generally fleeced for
    their gold in the Old West. When the campaign turkies flock to town trying to buy
    magical weapons, potions, scrolls, various other items of magical nature, get a
    chum turned back to flesh, have a corpse resurrected, or whatever, make them pay
    through their proverbial noses. For example, what would a player charge for like
    items or services? Find out, add a good bit, and that is the cost you as referee will
    make your personas charge. This will certainly be entertaining to you, and laying
    little traps in addition will keep the players on their collective toes. After all,Dungeonmasters are entitled to a little fun too! Another point to remember is that
    you should keep a strict account of time. The wizard who spends six months
    writing scrolls and enchanting items is OUT of the campaign for six months, he
    cannot play during these six game months, and if the time system is anywhere
    reflective of the proper scale that means a period of actual time in the neigh-
    borhood of three months. That will pretty well eliminate all that sort of
    foolishness. Ingredients for scroll writing and potion making should also be
    stipulated (we will treat this in an upcoming issue of SR or in a D & D supplement
    as it should be dealt with at length) so that it is no easy task to prepare scrolls or
    duplicate potions.
    When players no longer have reams of goodies at their fingertips they must
    use their abilities instead, and as you will have made your dungeons and wilder-
    nesses far more difficult and demanding, it will require considerable skill,
    imagination, and intellectual exercise to actually gain from the course of an ad-
    venture. Furthermore, when magic is rare it is valuable, and only if it is scarce
    will there be real interest in seeking it. When it is difficult to survive, a long
    process to gain levels, when there are many desired items of magical nature to seek
    for, then a campaign is interesting and challenging. Think about how much fun it
    is to have something handed to you on a silver platter — nice once in a while but
    unappreciated when it becomes common occurrence. This analogy applies to ex-
    perience and treasure in the D & D campaign.
    It requires no careful study to determine that D & D is aimed at progression
    which is geared to the approach noted above. There are no monsters to challenge
    the capabilities of 30th level lords, 40th level patriarchs, and so on. Now I know of
    the games played at CalTech where the rules have been expanded and changed to
    reflect incredibly high levels, comic book characters and spells, and so on. Okay.
    Different strokes for different folks, but that is not D & D. While D & D is pretty
    flexible, that sort of thing stretches it too far, and the boys out there are playing
    something entirely different — perhaps their own name “Dungeons & Beavers,”
    tells it best. It is reasonable to calculate that if a fair player takes part in 50 to 75
    games in the course of a year he should acquire sufficient experience points to
    make him about 9th to 11th level, assuming that he manages to survive all that
    play. The acquisition of successively higher levels will be proportionate to enhanced
    power and the number of experience points necessary to attain them, so another
    year of play will by no means mean a doubling of levels but rather the addition of
    perhaps two or three levels. Using this gauge, it should take four or five years to
    see 20th level. As BLACKMOOR is the only campaign with a life of five years, and
    GREYHAWK with a life of four is the second longest running campaign, the most
    able adventurers should not yet have attained 20th level except in the two named
    campaigns. To my certain knowledge no player in either BLACKMOOR or
    GREYHAWK has risen above 14th level.
    By requiring players to work for experience, to earn their treasure, means that
    the opportunity to retain interest will remain. It will also mean that the rules will
    fit the existing situation, a dragon, balrog, or whatever will be a fearsome
    challenge rather than a pushover. It is still up to the Dungeonmaster to make the
    campaign really interesting to his players by adding imaginative touches, through
    exertion to develop background and detailed data regarding the campaign, and to
    make certain that there is always something new and exciting to learn about or
    acquire. It will, however, be an easier task. So if a 33rd level wizard reflects a
    poorly managed campaign, a continuing mortality rate of 50% per expedition
    generally reflects over-reaction and likewise a poorly managed campaign. It is
    unreasonable to place three blue dragons on the first dungeon level, just as
    unreasonable as it is to allow a 10th level fighter to rampage through the upper
    levels of a dungeon rousting kobolds and giant rats to gain easy loot and ex-
    perience. When you tighten up your refereeing be careful not to go too far the other way.

    If I may interject, I'd like to refer you to the actual title of said piece: DnD is only as good as the DM, and point further to a two parter by Angry DM (which is a little bit more recent to accomodate for changes in dnd versions):part 1 and part 2 .

    I personally like gaining levels. it gives me new toys to play with and new options to use my abilities. This is why I love 5th edition, sure it levels a lot faster, but opposite that, the money and loot you get is pretty much unimportant and irrelevant. Conflict resolution is almost exclusively dependant on the tools you have in your class. Besides, a faster level progression allows me to employ a much greater variety of characters. If I have to wait for 3 years to actually get a feel for the class my character uses (and I'd say that assuming running a game once a week and to get to lvl 10 to get an actual feel for the class) then with my current life situation (where I haven't had the same address for following years in the past 6). Now if you want a slower moving game, that's fine, but that is taste. The fact that Gary Gygax (who created levelling by treasure and made Elf a class and not a race) preferred that, does not make it law (nor holy writ), but taste.

    And if the DM is able to give people the things that make is fun for the whole table, that is great DMing and it will make for great gaming.

    that said, I find it amusing that 3.5 is the target of grognardism, where as it is usually the source of grognardism versus 4e and 5e.

    as for dnd bucketlist, I'd like to go get to 20 in dnd, I'd like to play a couple of games of nWoD (preferably werewolves), and am on the cusp of playing Anima Prime RPG (and running it, finally acknowledging my initials), and run them for longer then the 1st session or 0th session that I reached for them respectively.

    Also, once I finish the collected works of Lovecraft, I'd like to engage in a game of Call of Cthulhu. Just for fun.
    Last edited by Socratov; 2016-09-04 at 02:02 PM.
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    Better grab a drink...

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    tongue Re: D&D bucket list

    I'd like to actually fight a Dragon in a Dungeon. Seriously it feels like it never actually happens anymore.
    Quote Originally Posted by Garazza
    You seem to be a jack of all trades. You can discuss most anything and play most card games.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jordan Cat View Post
    I'd like to actually fight a Dragon in a Dungeon. Seriously it feels like it never actually happens anymore.
    I feel like it's thought to be too conformist, like starting your party in a tavern (at least, judging from the forum signatures of a couple years back). But then again, I'm gonna start my players on Anima Prime next week, fighting their way out of a prison in a post apocalyptical setting.
    Warlock Poetry?
    Or ways to use me in game?
    Better grab a drink...

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    Since I'm here reading responses anyway, it occurs to me that I've never had my players fight a lot of the "classic" monsters - never had a solid run-in with orc bandits, never confronted them with antagonistic goblinoids of any kind, the only gnoll they ever met was the timid owner of a magic item shop, and they currently have a conspiracy that kobolds don't actually exist in any of my settings despite what they may hear from the locals and such because they've never ever seen any. (For the record? They're right. Clever jackals are on to me.)

    But really, am I missing some sort of quota here? Is this why I haven't found spiritual enlightenment yet?

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    Play a game of Anima: Beyond Fantasy. Now, I don't actually want to play it for its own sake as it's a weird and unintuitive system, but I coincidentally happen to have acquired the books and they've just been sitting there on the shelf collecting dust.

    I'd like to play a game about comic book supervillains. Something like the Spectacular Foes of Spider-Man, with a bit of Silver-Age innocence to it rather than child-murdering rapists or anything. Treating the characters more or less as real people who for whatever reason choose to act as eccentric criminals with weird themes they're apparently set upon that regularly fight against heroes that also routinely trounce them.

    I'd also like to make a game based off of Fate/Strange Fake, Ryohgo Narita's light novel/April fools joke which establishes a lesser version of the Fate's Holy Grail War in a sleepy American city. The novel works to minimize usage of much of the Fate canon as possible to create what is actually a pretty liberal RPG setting which keeps the core concept of mages and servants fighting one another intact, essentially. It'd be easy to adapt for my purposes, just need a system to use and to work out how it would be structured for my players.

    With regards to D&D:

    I've yet to play a Gnome, Dwarf, or Dragonborn from the core races. I'd like to just for the variety, but we've consented to limit the number of races in our settings (of which there are five, each with a different tone and general aim) for the sake of feeling less hodge-podge kitchen-sink-like and those three seem to be first on the chopping block or thereabouts. I suppose because none of them has a defender in our group.

    I'd like to play a Pixie too, something truly tiny. Figuring out the mechanics of it seemed like a bother, but I think I can deal with it now.

    I'd like to play a campaign where everyone is the same class - different archetypes maybe - but the same class. Partly because without the gameplay mechanical features to distinguish my PC the emphasis would be on characterization, at least in theory. Another being because it would interesting to note how we each individually approach problems using the same basic tools.
    Last edited by Kitten Champion; 2016-09-05 at 04:45 AM.

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    Addendum:

    I'd like to run a game where I start the party in a tavern, precisely because it's been so overdone that nobody actually does it anymore because it's "been so overdone."
    Planck length = 1.524e+0 m, Planck time = 6.000e+0 s. Mass quantum ~ 9.072e-3 kg because "50 coins weigh a pound" is the smallest weight mentioned. And light has five quantum states.

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    Quote Originally Posted by bulbaquil View Post
    Addendum:

    I'd like to run a game where I start the party in a tavern, precisely because it's been so overdone that nobody actually does it anymore because it's "been so overdone."
    In the first PbP game that I ever played the DM had us all meet at crossroads just inside the city gates. So I had my PC:
    Quote Originally Posted by 2D8HP View Post
    Why thank you. Do you know of a good Inn, by chance?
    Quote Originally Posted by IronLionShark View Post
    Aye, the Wobbling Wizard is a nice, cheap inn. It has a good bar-tend and decent rooms. I stayed there on a previous run for supplies.
    Quote Originally Posted by JNAProductions View Post
    No, I live here. But I've stayed in inns quite a bit-they're willing to let you stay free if you do performances.
    Quote Originally Posted by 2D8HP View Post
    Well I'm thirsty myself! Lets go hence!
    I always try to get my PC's into the Tavern at least once, after all what's the point of adventuring if you never "wet your whistle"?
    Grim specter of noogie hangs like shroud over us all


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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJ View Post
    Does the game you play feature a Dragon sitting on a pile of treasure, in a Dungeon?
    Quote Originally Posted by Ninja_Prawn View Post
    You're an NPC stat block."I remember when your race was your class you damned whippersnappers"
    Snazzy Avatar by Honest Tiefling!

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    One time I successfully created one of those scenarios where there is a guy & his imposter in the same room, with a person holding a gun, forced to decide which is the real & which is the imposter

    I was the imposter. I also convinced the guy with the gun to kill the real one.
    I'm working for the Empire. But don't worry… I'm not going to garrote you!

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    I'd like to play a character who's starring in a movie about people who play actors in spy movies.

    So there's
    - the player,
    - the character,
    - the character that my character is playing in the movie,
    - the character that my character's movie character is playing, and
    - the secret identity of that character.
    Planck length = 1.524e+0 m, Planck time = 6.000e+0 s. Mass quantum ~ 9.072e-3 kg because "50 coins weigh a pound" is the smallest weight mentioned. And light has five quantum states.

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    1) Become a god. Check
    2) Destroy not only the universe but the whole multiverse, by accident. Check
    3) Make a legendary character whose fame has spread to new players and other gaming groups. Check
    4) Kill a god. Check
    5) Go on a god killing spree just to prove a point how ridicilous epic level characters were. Check
    6) Kill Elminster while a level 10 character. Check
    7) Kill Khelben Blackstaff while a level 10 character. Check
    8) Be Killed by Elminster, Khelben Blackstaff and the Simbul who had wished the other two alive while playing a level 10 character. Check
    9) Kill a dragon singlehandedly when the party chickened out and watching the DM grind his teeth over all the 20s I rolled. Check
    10) Play a poker with the Devil and fooling him to take my shadow when I lost. Check
    11) Destroy the economy of Faerun and becoming the richest Paladin alive by exploiting the idiotic DnD pricing system. Check
    12) Kill Elminster again while I was on a God killing spree...just because I could. Check
    13) Make a DM hate me for always killing Ed Greenwood's DMPCs. Check
    14) Play an adept bioroid japanese schoolgirl with a pokemon backpack and punch through people. Check
    15) Make an ubermunchkin character and Roflstomp everything the GM threw at me after he killed my characters three times in a row. Check
    16) Have my ubermunchkin character mind controlled to kill himself because nothing else would do and still not die. Check
    17) Rename the Ectstacy spell to Orgasm spell and use it to form a addicted Valkyre bodyguard squad completely loyal to my Gurps mage. Check
    18) Ruin a magic ritual and "accidentally" sex change another player character. At least she looked like a teenager wet dream. Check
    19) Be killed after selling out the party for a spell that would have my teenage character wet dream love my character. Check
    20) Kill Elminster again just because I could and erase him completely from existence. Check


    I think this will do for now

    Goals

    1) Have a good time while playing and Gming
    2) Kill Elminster again.

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    Default Re: D&D bucket list

    1. Create an MTG system and use it.
    2. Play a Bully Pulpit game.
    3. Play 13th Age.
    4. Play FATE.
    5. Play GURPS.
    6. Play 4e epic fantasy.
    7. Play Dark Sun.
    8. Play Star Wars.
    9. Play modern fantasy.
    10. Play Call of Cthulhu.

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