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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Orc in the Playground
     
    MonkGuy

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    Default Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    So the Angry GM has devised a system for tracking and using the passing of time in D&D: http://theangrygm.com/hacking-time-in-dnd/

    I tried it out in a session yesterday and it went pretty well I thought. It was easier to make things like picking locks and searching rooms part of the actual gameplay, since each attempt adds a die to the pool and makes you that much more likely to get screwed over in some way, so searching a room thoroughly becomes a choice as opposed to an assumption. I did find I hugely underestimated the number of "bad events" I would need. I came up with four and was worried it wouldn't be enough, but in the end they only rolled for events twice and only got one. It took the length of this one single-session dungeon crawl to fill up and then clear the dice pool though - so they spent about an hour in the dungeon and had one random event. Seems about right.

    Has anyone else tried out this system? What did you think? And do you have any thoughts on expanding it to work for wilderness travel or downtime? Angry has said he's going to do a big overhaul of wilderness travel soon, but there's no harm in beating him to it, right?

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    NecromancerGirl

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Spoiler: Nitpick
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    Quote Originally Posted by HidesHisEyes View Post
    I did find I hugely underestimated the number of "bad events" I would need. I came up with four and was worried it wouldn't be enough, but in the end they only rolled for events twice and only got one.
    *Overestimated.


    I haven't used this, but I like the idea. It reminds me of an Elder Evil's signs, on a much shorter scale. I think plot-related 'bad stuff' is a lot better than random minor setbacks (snake bites and whatnot), but if you have to add minor setbacks (some adventures do call for attrition, after all), it's best to do it mechanically, so the DM can be a neutral arbiter of misfortune, rather than the source.
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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    there is also stories like "at the end of that day the world blow up"
    Then you figure out the bbeg did prepare his castle by making it have 200 rooms(stronghold builder rules + a bunch of wall of stones allow to net that number of rooms in a few weeks)
    you can not realistically explore them all.
    Then you figure out that the bbeg was doing his ritual in a hidden room and you lost.
    It sums up how most of the world ending situations would end if the world was realistic.
    Last edited by noob; 2017-06-03 at 02:01 PM.

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    Orc in the Playground
     
    MonkGuy

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Quote Originally Posted by ExLibrisMortis View Post
    Spoiler: Nitpick
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    *Overestimated.


    I haven't used this, but I like the idea. It reminds me of an Elder Evil's signs, on a much shorter scale. I think plot-related 'bad stuff' is a lot better than random minor setbacks (snake bites and whatnot), but if you have to add minor setbacks (some adventures do call for attrition, after all), it's best to do it mechanically, so the DM can be a neutral arbiter of misfortune, rather than the source.
    Yeah, the real power of the system is in using the events to drive the story, but not every adventure is going to suggest such events so minor setbacks and yes even nuisance encounters are a good "generic" option I think. And yeah it's great as a way of providing setbacks and forcing players to consider time a valuable resource without falling back on some vague DM fiat approach.

    Yes I of course meant overestimated, thanks for catching that!

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    I actually really like the idea-- I've toyed with using a "doom pool" type mechanic before, and it's a nice way to build tension. Using a system like this has a major advantage over the conventional ticking clock in that it's immediate. "Oh, you have 60 days to rescue the princess" is too long, too abstract to really weigh on a player's mind. Sure, it'll discourage excessive 15 minute workdays, but only on the macro level. There's still not much incentive to not take your time poking around dungeons and other adventures en-route, because the DM is probably just counting days.

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    It's rough, but I may be more excited about this than any other mechanic Angry has introduced.

    Like Angry said, D&D has dozens of actions and choices for which time is the primary drawback, but has never implemented a useful time mechanic. I really hope something like this is kept in mind for 6e some day (maybe even a variant rule in a hypothetical 5.5)

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    I am glad to see it working. I am planing a 5e game (as soon as we can pool resources and buy the core books) and I am planning on using this mechanic from the beginning.

    My first adventure is going to have a time limit in days, but multiple sites to explore/investigate. I think this will allow the characters to make interesting decisions: ie do we spend the whole day searching every room of the kobold warrens, or rush through it and get back to town before dark?
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    Orc in the Playground
     
    MonkGuy

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Quote Originally Posted by TripleD View Post
    It's rough, but I may be more excited about this than any other mechanic Angry has introduced.

    Like Angry said, D&D has dozens of actions and choices for which time is the primary drawback, but has never implemented a useful time mechanic. I really hope something like this is kept in mind for 6e some day (maybe even a variant rule in a hypothetical 5.5)
    Good heavens yes. He's really got to the bottom of something the game is missing, I think.

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Yes. I think that Angry created an ideal mechanic, because:

    D&D NEEDS a mechanic for handling the passage of time. But, the thing is, it isnít really about time. Itís about dread. D&D really needs a mechanic to make the players DREAD the passage of time.
    The simple solution is to go back to the old way of counting minutes and "turns" outside of combat. Angry considers this, and having run games this way, correctly rejects it.
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    Barbarian in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Hmmm what Angry suggests really isnt anything new. Random encounters have always provided the incentive not to dawdle. Early D&D had random encounters like 30% chance of an encounter, roll every 15 mins in a dungeon or every 8 hours in the wilderness. How the party spent its time was important. Random encounters went out the window with 4e because combat took too long and that broke the time game. But they're back with 5e.

    The trick is to make a custom random encounters list for your session - tailored to the adventure at hand. To borrow from Angry's example, include on the list for example (1) earthquake, (2) dragon starts to wake, (iii) child orc appears from around the corner, etc - interesting stuff other than fights. But also have fights. Including very dangerous fights. Random encounters should not be limited to quick, token fights. Sometimes they are deadly fights all of their own.

    And that's it, you're good to go.
    Last edited by Psikerlord; 2017-06-05 at 09:52 PM.
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Honestly I don't much see the point of this system.

    Time management isn't really that much of an issue in games I play. I can see it being kind of annoying if players want to "take 20" on every action, but I find a far simpler fix to simply not allow people to take 20 when it doesn't make sense; either let them auto-succeed or tell them that their initial roll stands depending on the situation.


    Now, the bigger issue with time in D&D has always been the whole recovering by sleeping / 15 minute adventuring day, which I really don't think this will do anything to solve. If players are allowed to sleep in the dungeon and recover all of their resources they will, and if it is possible it is always the right choice from a strategic perspective. The only system that stops this is one that interrupts them often enough that they can't go long enough to recover their spells, in which choice resting is no longer a valid option.

    As the poster above pointed out, it is essentially just a long winded version of the random encounter table.
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    This might work well for stealth missions. Every time you make a sound/pass a camera/stuff a guard in a closet/something you roll for being detected, and on a pass a dice or modifier gets added that makes it just a it more likely you'll get detected the next time. It's mildly realistic, because a guard who's heard a few things that didn't quite ring an alarm bell or who's wondering how big a turd John is cooking up in that bathroom or a dog who's sniffed a few strange humans already or who thought he saw something from the corner of its eye (is that a thing dogs do?) could be a bit more on their guard. It even works for things like breaking in to a house with a sleeping resident. I wouldn't think it's weird if someone who's already slept through a few noises was easier to wake up, seems entirely reasonable. It also helps set a time limit without giving the players the luxury of knowing the exact limit, and it's not as random as a flat roll, giving a very minor to no chance for detection on the first "hit" which increases as the players stomp around too much.
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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Quote Originally Posted by Talakeal View Post
    Honestly I don't much see the point of this system.

    Time management isn't really that much of an issue in games I play. I can see it being kind of annoying if players want to "take 20" on every action, but I find a far simpler fix to simply not allow people to take 20 when it doesn't make sense; either let them auto-succeed or tell them that their initial roll stands depending on the situation.

    As the poster above pointed out, it is essentially just a long winded version of the random encounter table.
    I mostly agree with the "long-winded random encounter table", but let's come back to that.

    When would taking 20 not make sense? And why would you want to discourage someone from taking 20?

    Angry seems to think that the answer is because it's not realistic. I much more cleave to the "S" in hated GNS, so I'm not going to argue with someone for claiming that this is a good reason to do pretty much anything.

    I'm also a big fan of role-playing. Doing things that aren't in character seems wrong to me.

    But here's the thing. IRL, let's say I hand you a gallon of nitroglycerin. Are you going to set it down gently, or just toss it in your backpack? When your life is on the line, are you going to be careful, or carefree?

    I know that there are people IRL who can't take anything seriously; happily, in older editions, they almost never made it past level 1. That was one of the things I liked most about earlier editions. You learned through the most Darwinian of training methods to properly roleplay a skilled adventurer.

    So, did Angry give us a system which maps and makes visible the passage of time, or how much attention the party has brought to themselves, coupled with appropriate consequences?

    No.

    Because we snuck quietly down the hall, we took more time, making it more likely for the dragon to wake up?

    Because we searched for secret passages, there was an earthquake?

    Because Angry hates people taking a 20, doing so produces no less than 3 rolls for random encounters, even though that should be quiet and take less time than some combats?

    Seriously, Angry, WTF? This is just punishing players for thinking. This is "I get to laugh at you for setting off the trap, or laugh at you for waking the dragon by slowly sneaking through the fortress instead of busting down the doors like a proper adventurer". This is the worst type of DMing, given legitimacy by having rules.

    So, no, I'm not a fan.

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    WhiteWizardGirl

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    To Quertus

    First, we should separate the mechanic itself from its application.

    The mechanic has nothing to do with realism. Its goal rather is making spending time on something a choice. If a player can search for secret passages and traps all the time, then doing so is not thinking, it's the default. And this situation makes traps and locked doors and some other things less meaningful, and that's bad for gameplay - at least that's the reasoning behind the mechanic. Also, the earthquake or dragon awakening or other misfortunes is something that is destined to happen over time. It's consequences of players taking their time, not of being carefree. Bringing attention to the party is handled differently from passing of time - by choosing between adding a die or rolling when time passes.

    So, if player want to experience fewer destined misfortunes, they will have to take the risk of missing traps or making noise while breaking doors, and here we begin to discuss the application of the mechanic. You called it "the worst type of DMing", but that will only be true if the mechanic is mishandled. Basically, if a DM applies it, they need to recognize the potential dilemma for the players and plan for it. For example, if players have some indication of how dangerous the traps are, and if there is some pattern to them, they will feel victory once they find a trap, but don't spend time in other rooms. There's nothing difficult to be that kind of "worst type" DM even without this mechanic, and i don't see why there can be no way to use it in an enjoyable way.

    I'm not arguing that the mechanic is good by the way, I didn't try it, and I have my own doubts. I'm only saying that your understanding is flawed.
    Last edited by Yllin; 2017-06-07 at 02:19 PM.

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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    @Yllin

    Ok, you've got a point - it's not as inherently horrible as I had read it to be. However, it's still "get bit by a random snake", or an earthquake, or other misfortunes roughly 18 times per day in the safest of forests. And heaven forbid you try to search said forest, because your added attention to detail will net you at least twice as many mishaps per day, and far more per journey.

    It doesn't make this a choice. It doesn't even encourage haste. It encourages hiring untrained laborers to pave the forest between you and the adventure site. Then hiring a trebuchet crew to level the site. Then sending your undead minions to sift through the rubble, bringing it back to you bit by bit as you sit in safety.

    I may not know how to encourage a proper amount of care for time spent, or even know exactly how much that proper amount is, but I suspect this isn't it.

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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    I kind of like how making violent/noisy and visible activity is encouraged: it makes a roll of the dice pool instead of increasing it.
    So if there is an horrible event at a result of 7(like the universe explodes violently when you do a 7) you just have to always be maximally noisy and visible so that there is never more than one dice in the dice pool(thus never risking to have 7 or more thus destroying the universe) and so you can take all your time as long as the team bard is using dancing lights and a giant musical anvil.
    Unless I misunderstood the rules.

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Quote Originally Posted by noob View Post
    I kind of like how making violent/noisy and visible activity is encouraged: it makes a roll of the dice pool instead of increasing it.
    So if there is an horrible event at a result of 7(like the universe explodes violently when you do a 7) you just have to always be maximally noisy and visible so that there is never more than one dice in the dice pool(thus never risking to have 7 or more thus destroying the universe) and so you can take all your time as long as the team bard is using dancing lights and a giant musical anvil.
    Unless I misunderstood the rules.
    The players don't get to know what the results might be ahead of time, like with any other random encounter table.

    Also results aren't based on the total roll, they're based on any die showing a 1.

    Quote Originally Posted by Quertus
    Ok, you've got a point - it's not as inherently horrible as I had read it to be. However, it's still "get bit by a random snake", or an earthquake, or other misfortunes roughly 18 times per day in the safest of forests.
    To my understanding this mechanic is for dungeons. Forests are a different environment with a different mechanic (or at the very least different time-scaling; days or quarter-days rather than hours unless they're extremely dangerous), and in "the safest of forests" you wouldn't be using a mechanic made to make players dread the passing of hours anyway. It's not a thing you use everywhere, it's a thing you use in places that are dangerous enough that taking your time is a risk.

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    "Never implemented a useful time mechanic" is not true. Keeping track of time used to be one of the DM's primary jobs, the game was organized around the passage of time in the form of turns, and everyone already pointed out that random encounter/wandering monster tables provide the "dread". Angry DM even knows this and mentions it, it's just that he feels this method was a "pain in the ass", which is by no means an objective or universal observation.
    So he created a mechanic that he likes better than the original rules, which is fine, but not necessarily a thing the game was missing.

    It is true that people who have only played 3e and later may not have had the importance of time emphasized in their play, and wandering monster tables stopped being a core mechanic, and this becomes a real issue. Of course, the easy solution is just to look at how the rules had always addressed the problem before WotC took over and completely missed important things that make the game work. Gygax's 1e DMG was very explicit about the importance of time keeping and the centrality of it to the game's functioning. I also think 5e is much better at addressing this than he is implying in the article.

    That said, I do think this is a clever mechanic that could be engaging for the players and an easy way to adjust the probability of random encounters happening (using different sided dice in the pool). This is really just a visual for the players to indicate time is passing and reminding them that bad stuff can happen the longer they spend in the dangerous place, and an alternative for the DM to marking off dashes on a paper or using a clicker or whatever they normally do to track turns (which really isn't that much of a pain, that's my job as the DM, imo). My hesitations is in whether I'd want the players to have the information regarding the level of danger via the type of die I was using in the pool - a part of me feels like this is artificial "dread" that should be reserved for the actual appearance of "bad stuff". They will start feeling more dread when they get hit with a couple of wandering monsters in quick succession, and start anticipating. It might be better for the DM to keep the time pool behind the screen.

    For a DM trying this out, I would want to remind them that movement must also add dice to the pool - it isn't just when the players take an action like searching or picking a lock or resting. You still need to keep track of how far the party can move in a ten minute period and how long their torches last. It isn't really all that different from keeping track of turns and rolling on the wandering monster table, it's just a little more visual/tactile.

    His comment about connecting "bad things" to the plot and environment aren't really specific to this mechanic but just a general good practice for any random encounter table.
    Last edited by Thrudd; 2017-06-07 at 09:48 PM.

  19. - Top - End - #19
    Barbarian in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Quote Originally Posted by Quertus View Post
    I mostly agree with the "long-winded random encounter table", but let's come back to that.

    When would taking 20 not make sense? And why would you want to discourage someone from taking 20?

    Angry seems to think that the answer is because it's not realistic. I much more cleave to the "S" in hated GNS, so I'm not going to argue with someone for claiming that this is a good reason to do pretty much anything.

    I'm also a big fan of role-playing. Doing things that aren't in character seems wrong to me.

    But here's the thing. IRL, let's say I hand you a gallon of nitroglycerin. Are you going to set it down gently, or just toss it in your backpack? When your life is on the line, are you going to be careful, or carefree?

    I know that there are people IRL who can't take anything seriously; happily, in older editions, they almost never made it past level 1. That was one of the things I liked most about earlier editions. You learned through the most Darwinian of training methods to properly roleplay a skilled adventurer.

    So, did Angry give us a system which maps and makes visible the passage of time, or how much attention the party has brought to themselves, coupled with appropriate consequences?

    No.

    Because we snuck quietly down the hall, we took more time, making it more likely for the dragon to wake up?

    Because we searched for secret passages, there was an earthquake?

    Because Angry hates people taking a 20, doing so produces no less than 3 rolls for random encounters, even though that should be quiet and take less time than some combats?

    Seriously, Angry, WTF? This is just punishing players for thinking. This is "I get to laugh at you for setting off the trap, or laugh at you for waking the dragon by slowly sneaking through the fortress instead of busting down the doors like a proper adventurer". This is the worst type of DMing, given legitimacy by having rules.

    So, no, I'm not a fan.
    I personally dont allow take 10s or take 20s at all (I dont use PP either). When you roll, it's assumed you did your best at the time, there is no trying again - except in cases where it makes sense that you can progress in some way - eg bashing down a door, each time it's a little more damaged etc - but really, why roll at all then, unless there is a time pressure deadline.

    Otherwise I only allow a retry if the circumstances have somehow signficantly changed. Eg: monster knowledge check, fails, cant try again until she examines the dead body of one, or researches in a library, or gains a level, etc. Otherwise ime take 20 is, frankly, quite broken really.
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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    So now someone takes the feat that allows to take 10 on caster level checks while in a stressful situation do you tell him "no I will still not allow tens"
    Or do you ban that feat and remove one of the main power rogue gets(the ability to take ten on some skill checks in stressful situations)
    I guess that at your table when the players hear you forbid tens they just add ten more points to their skills and then just always have better than a ten.
    Oh unless you are one of those gms who make that each time someone receive a boost in jump the chasm gets wider right in front of their eyes(like I cast guidance of the avatar oh no the pit got 6 feet wider)?
    Then when the fighter rolls for attack on a pit fiend either he miss and will never hit him unless he trains again or he hits and will never miss?
    Last edited by noob; 2017-06-08 at 04:55 AM.

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Taking 20 is, I think, the same basic idea as "don't roll unless there's an interesting consequence for failing." You can only do it when there's no time crunch and no danger if you screw up-- in other words, a failure isn't going to have much effect, so you might as well say "it works" and move on.
    Last edited by Grod_The_Giant; 2017-06-08 at 08:29 AM.

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Quote Originally Posted by Grod_The_Giant View Post
    I actually really like the idea-- I've toyed with using a "doom pool" type mechanic before, and it's a nice way to build tension. Using a system like this has a major advantage over the conventional ticking clock in that it's immediate.
    Same here.

    My "Doom Pool" experience was entirely in Cortex+ (both Marvel Heroic and Leverage), but it was a good mechanic, and encouraged escalation in some really dramatic ways.

    The basic mechanic described by Angry DM is like the Cortex+ "Doom Pool", and that means it's good -- however there are parts that need more work, specifically the conditions around removing dice / resetting the pool.

    I mention this because I'm going to give a hard look at the Cortex+ mechanics to see what could be stolen for D&D. Their Doom Pool felt pretty polished when I played with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grod_The_Giant View Post
    Taking 20 is, I think, the same basic idea as "don't roll unless there's an interesting consequence for failing." You can only do it when there's no time crunch and no danger if you screw up-- in other words, a failure isn't going to have much effect, so you might as well say "it works" and move on.
    Yeah, but it does take the most time.

    So, you get your "it works", but you pay for it using risk as a resource (+1 die in the Doom Pool).

    (Granted, it might be the case that rolling a 1 does nothing more than cause a wardrobe malfunction, but that's getting off a bit light...)

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    I think this is pretty cool. I'll try it in my next session but I think with one adjustment: Instead of the 'danger-level' of the dungeon determining the size of the dice, I'll have it determined by what the players are doing with their time.

    If they spend ten minutes searching a room in a fortress with regular patrols, and that room is on the patrol route: add a d4. If they spend a little extra time to sneak slowly through a hallway adjacent to a barrack full of sleeping goblins: add a d12. (Logic being: Something could still happen due to the passage of time, like a goblin just getting up to use the bathroom, but it's less likely to happen since they're actively trying to mitigate the risk.)

    Does anyone see flaws with this change to the system that I am not noticing?
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    Tanarii's Avatar

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    He has revised and expanded his rules btw:
    http://theangrygm.com/exploration-rules/

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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    So I can no longer prevent the time pool from filling by shouting very strong and throwing rockets everywhere.
    But I guess that I can instead have 11 minute duration buff last forever.
    Glad that now shapechange or a persisted transcend mortality lasts forever as long as I do not go out of the dungeon.

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Quote Originally Posted by noob View Post
    So I can no longer prevent the time pool from filling by shouting very strong and throwing rockets everywhere.
    But I guess that I can instead have 11 minute duration buff last forever.
    Glad that now shapechange or a persisted transcend mortality lasts forever as long as I do not go out of the dungeon.
    Where do you get that? Nothing about being noisy prevents the Time Pool from filling, nor durations from expiring.
    The only thing that stops the time pool from filling is rushing at a task, but duration still expires in that case.
    "If the party was rushing at a task, the GM also does not add a token to the Time Pool. However, in those cases, the GM still Advances Time and all applicable duration expire."

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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Quote Originally Posted by Tanarii View Post
    Where do you get that? Nothing about being noisy prevents the Time Pool from filling, nor durations from expiring.
    The only thing that stops the time pool from filling is rushing at a task, but duration still expires in that case.
    "If the party was rushing at a task, the GM also does not add a token to the Time Pool. However, in those cases, the GM still Advances Time and all applicable duration expire."
    Being noisy enough prevented the time pool from gaining dice in the previous version and it is no longer true in the new one.
    in the new one the thing is it says
    When Time Advances, any effect with 10 minutes or less remaining of its duration expires. Other durations are not effected
    So an 11 minutes duration effect is not effected so it stays at 11 minutes(else he would not say "are not effected" he would say "lose duration normally")
    He was speaking of the durations not being effected and not of the effects not being effected.
    (it was probably a mistake but it is 100% raw)
    Last edited by noob; 2017-06-08 at 12:32 PM.

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Quote Originally Posted by noob View Post
    So an 11 minutes duration effect is not effected so it stays at 11 minutes(else he would not say "are not effected" he would say "lose duration normally")
    He was speaking of the durations not being effected and not of the effects not being effected.
    (it was probably a mistake but it is 100% raw)
    Oh hey, you answered something I had posted about on his site!

    The reason other durations (more than 10 min) are not affected is that they expire when you Clear the Time Pool. That takes care of all durations of 11 min to 1hr.
    If there are already six tokens in the Time Pool when Time Advances, the GM does not add another token to the Time Pool. Instead, it means that one hour of game time has passed and it is time to Clear the Time Pool.

    After all effects with 10 minutes or less remaining of their durations expires as normal for Advancing Time, any effect with an hour or less remaining of its duration expires. Any effect with a duration greater than one hour remaining has one hour subtracted from its remaining duration. Then, the GM Rolls for Complications regardless of whether any attempted actions were loud or rushed. The GM should only roll six dice and not add any for the final advancement of time that caused the Time Pool to clear. Whether a Complication occurs or not, the GM then removes all tokens from the Time Pool.


    It doesn't last forever if it's 11 min or more, it lasts until you clear the Time Pool.

    However, that does mean you're abstracting and rounding up 11 min or more durations to be 1 hour. I'd have to comb through the book to find how many 5e durations are that are more than 10 min, but less than 1 hr. But there aren't many. So that might be why he did that. It'd be a pretty huge effect in any edition where the durations are 10 min/level though.

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    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    Or a 1 min per caster level: at cl 11 it becomes super long lasting.

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    Default Re: Trying Out Angry's Time Mechanic

    If you're using it for something with more varying durations, like 3.5, you could easily say "tick off 10 minutes of duration every time Time Advances."

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