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  1. - Top - End - #61
    Firbolg in the Playground
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vinyadan View Post
    In this case, I think it's important to specify what you mean by Phoenician; I'd never heard that with that sense.
    I think I did? I said I live in Phoenix, thus am Phoenician. Considering the real Phoenicians didn't even last to the CE, I think that's enough context.

  2. - Top - End - #62
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by SZbNAhL View Post
    I'd call that a truism. I'd say tautology is a repetition of information, either from acronym confusion (e.g. PIN number) or describing nouns with adjectives already included in their definitions e.g. organic aldehyde, French Parisian, microscopic atom.

    As for new words, I learned "crepuscular" today, meaning "of or related to twilight"*. I therefore move that Stephanie Meyer fans henceforth be referred to as "the crepuscular collective".

    *Here was the context, if anyone's interested.
    If you want another useful context, some animals (like bunnies) are crepuscular, meaning they are most activate at dawn and dusk, but rest both during the largest portion of the day and at night.

  3. - Top - End - #63
    Ettin in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Razade View Post
    I think I did? I said I live in Phoenix, thus am Phoenician. Considering the real Phoenicians didn't even last to the CE, I think that's enough context.
    Yup, that's what I mean: it's not understandable without naming the city. Maybe it's frequent over there? I have heard that people from Albany calling themselves Albanians have problems making themselves clear the further they are from Albany.

    It's also that you sometimes do meet people calling themselves after ancient peoples who lived in their place of origin, even though modern inhabitants would consider it highly unusual.
    Quote Originally Posted by J.R.R. Tolkien, 1955
    I thought Tom Bombadil dreadful but worse still was the announcer's preliminary remarks that Goldberry was his daughter (!), and that Willowman was an ally of Mordor (!!).

  4. - Top - End - #64
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by SZbNAhL View Post
    I'd call that a truism. I'd say tautology is a repetition of information, either from acronym confusion (e.g. PIN number) or describing nouns with adjectives already included in their definitions e.g. organic aldehyde, French Parisian, microscopic atom.

    As for new words, I learned "crepuscular" today, meaning "of or related to twilight"*. I therefore move that Stephanie Meyer fans henceforth be referred to as "the crepuscular collective".

    *Here was the context, if anyone's interested.
    A truism would be statement that is always true (and so doen't bring anything nex to the conversation) but it doesn't necessarily have the element of redundancy that a pleonasm or a tautology have. Ex: "You win some, you lose some".
    "Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peelee View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Fyraltari View Post
    the Vector Legion [is the IFCC's new pawns], mark my words. Way too much unfinished business there and they already know about the Gates.
    I'll take that bet.

  5. - Top - End - #65
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vinyadan View Post
    Yup, that's what I mean: it's not understandable without naming the city. Maybe it's frequent over there? I have heard that people from Albany calling themselves Albanians have problems making themselves clear the further they are from Albany.

    It's also that you sometimes do meet people calling themselves after ancient peoples who lived in their place of origin, even though modern inhabitants would consider it highly unusual.
    People from Albany are obviously "Albanites", not "Albanians".
    Quote Originally Posted by Wardog View Post
    Rockphed said it well.
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    When your pants are full of crickets, you don't need mnemonics.
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  6. - Top - End - #66
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Here is a good one: "footling" meaning silly or not important.

    "His theory was founded on footling facts."
    A long surcote of pers upon he hade, / And by his syde he baar a rusty blade. - Chaucer

  7. - Top - End - #67
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    "Colluquy" is a conversation, apparently. It's not often I can't at least figure out a word from context clues, but Brent Weeks has issues writing human sounding dialogue sometimes.

  8. - Top - End - #68
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rynjin View Post
    "Colluquy" is a conversation, apparently. It's not often I can't at least figure out a word from context clues, but Brent Weeks has issues writing human sounding dialogue sometimes.
    You can use this trick: soli-loquy = speaking alone, col-loquy = speaking with someone else (col- is like the one in col-league, col-lection, col-lide...).
    Quote Originally Posted by J.R.R. Tolkien, 1955
    I thought Tom Bombadil dreadful but worse still was the announcer's preliminary remarks that Goldberry was his daughter (!), and that Willowman was an ally of Mordor (!!).

  9. - Top - End - #69
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    PirateCaptain

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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rynjin View Post
    "Colluquy" is a conversation, apparently. It's not often I can't at least figure out a word from context clues, but Brent Weeks has issues writing human sounding dialogue sometimes.
    Hence the term "colloquial", literally meaning "as used in conversational speech".
    NB: While I never mean to offend anybody, sometimes the unfortunate combination of Aspergersism and the inherent difficulty of reading a situation through uninflected text over the internet get in the way of that goal. Please feel free to point out any social faux pas, inappropriate joke timing, etc.

  10. - Top - End - #70
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vinyadan View Post
    You can use this trick: soli-loquy = speaking alone, col-loquy = speaking with someone else (col- is like the one in col-league, col-lection, col-lide...).
    If it was coliloquy, I would have picked that up, but sadly didn't.

  11. - Top - End - #71
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by SZbNAhL View Post
    Hence the term "colloquial", literally meaning "as used in conversational speech".
    And "loquacious" meaning "likes to engage in conversation".
    The Curse of the House of Rookwood: Supernatural horror and family drama.
    Ash Island: Personal survival horror in the vein of Silent Hill.

  12. - Top - End - #72
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    From the same book that gave me footling:

    peregrinations: journeys, especially long or meandering ones.

    "Her peregrinations took her to the tip of the bay."
    A long surcote of pers upon he hade, / And by his syde he baar a rusty blade. - Chaucer

  13. - Top - End - #73
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlet Knight View Post
    From the same book that gave me footling:

    peregrinations: journeys, especially long or meandering ones.

    "Her peregrinations took her to the tip of the bay."
    That is where the Peregrine Falcon gets its name - it is the Wandering Falcon.

  14. - Top - End - #74
    Ettin in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Khedrac View Post
    That is where the Peregrine Falcon gets its name - it is the Wandering Falcon.
    I didn't check this, but it should ultimately come from "per agros" , "through the country" . Latin A sometimes becomes E, like with perennial (from "per annos" , "through the years" )
    Last edited by Vinyadan; 2020-08-22 at 02:56 PM.

  15. - Top - End - #75
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    WolfInSheepsClothing

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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Jamais Vu, when something that should be familiar seems new.

  16. - Top - End - #76
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Spacewolf View Post
    Jamais Vu, when something that should be familiar seems new.
    So the converse of Deja Vu?
    Quote Originally Posted by Wardog View Post
    Rockphed said it well.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Starfall
    When your pants are full of crickets, you don't need mnemonics.
    Dragontar by Serpentine.

    Now offering unsolicited advice.

  17. - Top - End - #77
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    "Dj vu" means "already seen" and "jamais vu" means "never seen".
    The Curse of the House of Rookwood: Supernatural horror and family drama.
    Ash Island: Personal survival horror in the vein of Silent Hill.

  18. - Top - End - #78
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    George Carlin, the great comedian, created: "Vuja De, the feeling that somehow... none of this has ever happened before"
    A long surcote of pers upon he hade, / And by his syde he baar a rusty blade. - Chaucer

  19. - Top - End - #79
    Pixie in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Fingerer (no it doesn't mean the first thing that comes to mind... you perverts )

    A friend found the word in a crossword puzzle. Merriam-Webster website defines the word "fingerer" as "one who makes the fingers of gloves" and this just blew my mind. I have been looking for hours trying to find any information on the etymology of this word. I had so many questions like: Was it an actual profession that existed that prompted the word? How was it used? Has it gone out of use?

    Well, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, "finger" originates in Old English, hence is Germanic in origin.

    The OED recognizes "fingerer" as a dishonest person. So, perhaps a thief? A swindler?

    A "glover" is a maker of gloves so I doubt there would be a separate profession for fingers. No clue where the Merriam-Webster definition came from.
    Last edited by WinterKnight404; 2020-08-26 at 10:11 AM.

  20. - Top - End - #80
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    PirateCaptain

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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by WinterKnight404 View Post
    The OED recognizes "fingerer" as a dishonest person. So, perhaps a thief? A swindler?
    I don't know how widespread it is, but I've heard finger used colloquially as a verb meaning "steal", e.g.:
    Quote Originally Posted by Hypothetical bloke
    Arrest 'im constable, that's the man what fingered me telly.
    Also, today I learned the word "oblocutor", meaning somebody who disputes.
    NB: While I never mean to offend anybody, sometimes the unfortunate combination of Aspergersism and the inherent difficulty of reading a situation through uninflected text over the internet get in the way of that goal. Please feel free to point out any social faux pas, inappropriate joke timing, etc.

  21. - Top - End - #81
    Dragon in the Playground Moderator
     
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by WinterKnight404 View Post
    No clue where the Merriam-Webster definition came from.
    There are two schools of thought on dictionaries - that dictionaries dictate what words mean and their usage and are thus authoritative, or that dictionaries reflect how people use words and are thus curatorial. Merriam-Webster itself subscribes to the latter, so I would imagine that "fingerer" was used for some time, at least, in order to be included in their dictionary.
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  22. - Top - End - #82
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by WinterKnight404 View Post
    Fingerer (no it doesn't mean the first thing that comes to mind... you perverts )

    A friend found the word in a crossword puzzle. Merriam-Webster website defines the word "fingerer" as "one who makes the fingers of gloves" and this just blew my mind. I have been looking for hours trying to find any information on the etymology of this word. I had so many questions like: Was it an actual profession that existed that prompted the word? How was it used? Has it gone out of use?

    [...]

    A "glover" is a maker of gloves so I doubt there would be a separate profession for fingers. No clue where the Merriam-Webster definition came from.
    From the website "careerplanner.com"

    "GLOVE SEWER"Job Description and Jobs
    Job Description:
    1) Operates sewing machine to join or decorate glove and mitten parts or finished article: Guides parts under machine needle to join thumb pieces to back and palm; to assemble finger pieces and join pieces to glove; to join sides of cuffs or cuff to glove; to stitch around fingers, thumb, and sides of glove to close glove openings; to sew on knuckle strap or finger tips; to join parts of mittens; or to stitch knit linings to elastic wristbands to complete cuffs.


    2) May repair gloves with defective stitching and be designated Mender.


    3) May be designated according to part sewn or operation performed as Closer; Fingerer; Fourchette Sewer; Knuckle-Strap Sewer; Mitten Stitcher; Palm-And-Back Forger.


    4) May be designated: Strapper; Thumb Sewer; Tipper; Wrist Closer; Wrister; Wrist Liner.


    5) Performs duties as described under SEWING-MACHINE OPERATOR, REGULAR EQUIPMENT Master Title.

    So I guess it's a specific term for a worker within an industry, more of a function than a profession.
    Quote Originally Posted by J.R.R. Tolkien, 1955
    I thought Tom Bombadil dreadful but worse still was the announcer's preliminary remarks that Goldberry was his daughter (!), and that Willowman was an ally of Mordor (!!).

  23. - Top - End - #83
    Pixie in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Good catch Vinyadan! I don't remember what the clue was in the crossword puzzle because that might have helped. So it's probably a specialized function on an assembly line.

  24. - Top - End - #84
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by SZbNAhL View Post
    I don't know how widespread it is, but I've heard finger used colloquially as a verb meaning "steal", e.g.:
    To finger someone also means basically to snitch on someone. Obviously comes from point out someone with your finger, ie fingering someone. And everyone knows snitches get stiches, maybe in their gloves, which I think is where "fingerer" gets the "shady" descriptor.

    But youy are right, if your organisation has a Frankie the Finger or Fingers you know he's the pickpocket of the outfit. Actually think there is a Lucky Luke album where the shady magician that does slight of hand, but also steals is nicknamed Fingers. Depends on translation though I guess.

  25. - Top - End - #85
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    There is a baseball Hall of Famer named Rollie Fingers. I wonder what was the source of his family name? Thief ? Glove maker? Snitch? Lute picker?
    Last edited by Scarlet Knight; 2020-09-09 at 08:52 AM.
    A long surcote of pers upon he hade, / And by his syde he baar a rusty blade. - Chaucer

  26. - Top - End - #86
    Firbolg in the Playground
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    It comes from someone either missing a finger, make of that how you will, or similar distinct characteristics of the fingers such as a birth defect. Not all Western surnames come from an occupation.
    Last edited by Razade; 2020-08-28 at 10:20 PM.

  27. - Top - End - #87
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Razade View Post
    It comes from someone either missing a finger, make of that how you will, or similar distinct characteristics of the fingers such as a birth defect. Not all Western surnames come from an occupation.
    Had a customer one time, crazy name. Alone the lines of "ribeyefake". Basically almost a real food but altered so that it sounded like fake food. Asked about it at one point, apparently had grandparents or great-grandparents come over through Ellis Island, where the culturally sensitive agents that processed the immigrants said "Name? Whoah, I can't understand that, did you say "ribeyefake?" Well, here's your papers, Mr. Ribeyefake, that's your name now. NEXT!"

    So yeah, names can come from anywhere.
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  28. - Top - End - #88
    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rockphed View Post
    Is the point to come out hating Werther? Because just from that description I already hate Werther.
    The concept of "identity" is a rather young one. Werther was actually one of the first literary examples for using it, making the difference between "inside" and "outside" identity the main topic of the novel.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlet Knight View Post
    Again in another book review I ran upon a German word that I never heard of before.

    Weltschmerz (from the German, literally world-pain, also world weariness) .

    A book review referred to Lincoln as "a character of deep wisdom and soul and Weltschmerz".
    This is rather hard to explain to someone not sharing the German mindset.

  29. - Top - End - #89
    Dragon in the Playground Moderator
     
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Florian View Post
    This is rather hard to explain to someone not sharing the German mindset.
    Which is why you should ask an Austrian.
    Last edited by Peelee; 2020-08-29 at 08:30 AM.
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  30. - Top - End - #90
    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: What new words have you learned recently?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peelee View Post
    Which is why you should ask an Austrian.
    No, you don't.

    Its better to acknowledge that there are a few countries able to form their "inland empire", most often based on population density.

    Iran, Turkey, Germany, Japan and HK fit that bill, former empires like Austria or the UK don't.

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