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  1. - Top - End - #1
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    As seen on youtube, Part 1 and Part 2 , and as discussed in the Guardian

    Quote Originally Posted by Guardian
    A Soviet television adaptation of The Lord of the Rings thought to have been lost to time was rediscovered and posted on YouTube last week, delighting Russian-language fans of JRR Tolkien.

    The 1991 made-for-TV film, Khraniteli, based on Tolkien’s The Fellowship of the Ring, is the only adaptation of his Lord of the Rings trilogy believed to have been made in the Soviet Union.

    Aired 10 years before the release of the first instalment of Peter Jackson’s movie trilogy, the low-budget film appears ripped from another age: the costumes and sets are rudimentary, the special effects are ludicrous, and many of the scenes look more like a theatre production than a feature-length film.

    The score, composed by Andrei Romanov of the rock band Akvarium, also lends a distinctly Soviet ambience to the production, which was reportedly aired just once on television before disappearing into the archives of Leningrad Television.
    Haven't watched it yet, but I hope there's some good commentary as the real hero of the show -- Sam, hero of labor -- carries Frodo's fat plutocratic tuckus across half of middle earth, listening to him whine all the way

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Last edited by pendell; 2021-04-06 at 12:01 PM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Firbolg in the Playground
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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    Originally Posted by The Guardian
    ...the low-budget film appears ripped from another age: the costumes and sets are rudimentary, the special effects are ludicrous, and many of the scenes look more like a theatre production than a feature-length film.
    From what I can tell this pretty much nails it. The better moments look like an extremely low-budget 80s flick, as filmed on a college theater set.

    Does anyone speak enough Russian to tell how closely the dialogue matches the book?

  3. - Top - End - #3
    Troll in the Playground
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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    All Comicshorse's posts come with the advisor : This is just my opinion any difficulties arising from implementing my ideas are your own problem

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    Orc in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    This is probably the first adaption I've seen put to film that actually had the guts to put Tom Bombadil in. Don't speak any Russian, but I think I'll give this a full watch anyway.

    Thanks for the link!

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    Troll in the Playground
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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    Quote Originally Posted by Dire_Flumph View Post
    This is probably the first adaption I've seen put to film that actually had the guts to put Tom Bombadil in. Don't speak any Russian, but I think I'll give this a full watch anyway.

    Thanks for the link!
    Can we hope for a review ?
    All Comicshorse's posts come with the advisor : This is just my opinion any difficulties arising from implementing my ideas are your own problem

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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    I really wanna know if Aragorn still becomes king at the end.
    "Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced."
    Gehm's corollary to Clarke's Third Law



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    Quote Originally Posted by Peelee View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Fyraltari View Post
    the Vector Legion [is the IFCC's new pawns], mark my words. Way too much unfinished business there and they already know about the Gates.
    I'll take that bet.

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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    Quote Originally Posted by Fyraltari View Post
    I really wanna know if Aragorn still becomes king at the end.
    No, the great Aragorn Arathornovich is the general of the brave but outmanned Red Army who holds up Sauron's Panzers until hobbits turn his flank.
    “A long surcote of pers upon he hade, / And by his syde he baar a rusty blade.” - Chaucer

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    Orc in the Playground
     
    Flumph

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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    Quote Originally Posted by comicshorse View Post
    Can we hope for a review ?
    Wouldn't feel comfortable doing one, especially since I don't speak the language much. Will see what thoughts I have after finding time to watch it all, but that will likely not be for a few days. It's also a challenge given that this does look like an earnest attempt at the material, but paired with some absolutely hilarious visuals (Moria Dance Party!)


    Quote Originally Posted by Fyraltari View Post
    I really wanna know if Aragorn still becomes king at the end.
    Looks like it just covers Fellowship of the Ring and ends with Frodo and Sam riding off to Mordor (one simply does not walk there after all).

  9. - Top - End - #9
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    Right. This covers Fellowship of the Ring, the first book, in which working-class heroes Merry and Pippin are being carried off by the Running Dog servants of Saruman and Sauron, while Frodo and Sam make their way into Mordor. I assume Aragorn Arathornovich will rouse an army of workers and peasants in the pass, rather than wights, distract the Enemy, and be elected General Secretary when all is done. Or at least get a nice, shiny Hero of Gondor medal to wear on his lapel.


    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

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    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    So I just watched part 1 and this will be a combination let's watch/review. I expect to get to Part 2 tomorrow or soon afterwards.

    I'm going to be very kind in this review, as I might be for a high school play. Of course this isn't a Peter Jackson epic -- they didn't have the technology, or the budget. So I'm going to be looking more for the effect they produce -- faithfulness to the story, portrayal of the characters, and so forth.


    I don't speak Russian or read it, so I'm going to be looking almost entirely at visuals, as well as the music.

    Spoiler: Part One
    Show

    Intro : Music. Seems kind of sad and melancholy,
    while we have a montage of the movie.
    Sort of a psychedelic effect around the ring. Hurts my eyes a bit.


    The Nazgul are riding piebald mounts? I'd want them to be black, per Tolkien lore.

    At 2:16 we get hit by a wall of text. I suppose this is a star wars-like crawl to catch up the viewer on the background we don't have time to show on-camera.

    At 2:39 we have a professor type pick up a large red book (probably the Red Book of Westmarch) and starts to read. I'm guessing these are the opening sentences of the book which segue into the show.

    This is the birthday party. A large woman in a white dress looks like she has some good dance moves, and what must be Pippin is stuffing his face.

    At 5:25 Bilbo comes out to give his speech.

    Then another guy jumps on and bumps with Bilbo. Maybe this is Frodo, who has his birthday on the same day?

    Bilbo kisses the woman hand? WUT? Bilbo, have you been holding out on us?

    Gandalf arrives, wearing an amazingly purple tunic. He kisses Bilbo. I think this is a Russian thing.

    We have the fireworks scene as Gandalf opens his cloak. Not Hollywood -- you have to use a lot of imagination while watching the show -- but it gets the point across.

    Cut to Bilbo and Gandalf in a quiet corner, looks like inside now. This is a flashback , as I gather from later clues.

    They look like they're in some shady nightclub discussing important secrets.

    Bilbo hands over a letter. These must be his will and documents.

    Gandalf presses him for the ring. Some good acting on Bilbo's part here -- it's in his pocket, and he is extremely reluctant. Raised voices, and I know what "nyet" means.

    Bilbo doesn't want to give up the ring.

    Gandalf starts waving his hands at him as s a disco number starts up. I guess this is supposed to represent magic.

    I don't like that part. The point of Bilbo giving up his ring of his own accord is important to the story and his character.

    An intercut picture of a guy in a hood with the ring, but this isn't explained.

    Back to the birthday party. Bilbo is making his speech and getting cheers.

    He introduces Frodo, who seems awfully active.

    He bangs sticks together, jumps up and gives Bilbo a hug.

    He says goodbye, we see him slip the ring on his finger and vanish. They are supposed to shock his guests, but it is under-acted. They don't seem very shocked.

    Next shot is of Bilbo walking off with a sack over his shoulder.

    He successfully puts the ring in the letter.

    Now Gandalf and Frodo meet in the house. Gandalf has what I think of as a Cardinal Richelieu-style beard and mustache.

    Gandalf starts filling in Frodo on the backstory.

    We have a FIGHT SCENE! I guess this is supposed to be the battle of Dagorlad, when Sauron was defeated by the Last Alliance. But it's obvious they didn't have a martial arts coordinator or a stuntperson-- the fight is a picture of many people intercut swinging swords. And if you look closely they aren't even cutting at each other, just swinging them wildly in space. A Bruce Lee movie this is not.

    Back to the Shire. What is this bright yellow light in the scene? It doesn't look like a candle, and electric lighting would be an anachronism. They must have a reason for it, as it wasn't edited out, but I don't know what they're trying to tell with it.

    Frodo tries to put the ring on but Gandalf talks him out of it. Again, a picture of guy in black robes cut in and out very quickly. Is this Sauron?

    Hey! Who knew Frodo whittled?

    Now Frodo's hiding under a pillow? Maybe his new plan is to hide from the Enemy?

    Cut to our narrator. I catch the word "Anduin" so when the next scene I see is two guys on a riverbank fishing, I know this must be Deagol and Smeagol recovering the ring. Oh goodie, murder time!

    Some editing would be good. We can see Deagol swimming underwater but it's obvious the actor is against a backdrop.

    But he gets the ring and comes out of the water. Smeagol helps him out and wipes him down. They look at the ring together.

    Smeagol wants the ring, Deagol tells him to **** off. Smeagol grabs the ring with one hand while choking Deagol with the other. Sound reminiscent of a heartbeat in the background as the life is choked out of him.

    Still -- choking a man one-handed? Dang, Smeagol was strong even back in the day.

    And now I know "Ne Pravne" means "My precious", from the way Smeagol gloats and repeats the words over and over.


    Narrator again. I wish they did more show, less tell, but I guess the budget dictates.

    Smeagol metamorphoses into Gollum in about three frames, which makes my eyes twitch a bit. I catch the word "Gorrum", so I guess that is how you say "Gollum" in Russian.

    Gollum in the mountains. Dang, but this actor is a ham.

    Now THERE'S a scene they wouldn't have the guts to show in the west: Gandalf interrogating Gollum by threatening him with a hot poker. In the original text it says Gandalf "put the fear of fire in him" but no one pursues that very far because Gandalf's supposed to be a good guy. This Gandalf's a bit more ruthless than the western version.

    Back to the Shire as Gandalf is still talking. Now I see that big yellow light is a candle, out of focus. I know we're low budget, but I think they could have put a little more attention into ensuring everything in shot is in focus and properly lighted.

    Frodo is rockin' a white tie with red polka dots. I question his fashion choices.

    I catch the word "Hobbiton". I think Gandalf is telling Frodo he needs to leave the town. Frodo doesn't seem to like this idea.

    The ring gets tossed into the fire. It's a pretty bad cut, as it is obvious the ring and the fire are in entirely separate pictures.

    Disco theme and psychedelic ring as it goes out of focus and reappears with engraved letters. So disco music=magic. Right, cue noted.

    A bunch of dudes riding past on horses. There are nine of them, so they must be the Nazgul, but they seem awfully colorful for Black Riders. The first rider is wearing a green cloak, and the horses are piebald or brown, not black.

    The very front of Gandalf's hair is colored purple while the rest is salt-and-pepperish grey. So Gandalf was a punk back in the day. Who knew?

    Next scene is the Hobbits in heavy winter clothing crossing the wilderness, probably walking in the shire. There's snow on the ground. The scene is played for laughs -- it looks like they have no idea what they're doing or where they're going.

    Narrator shows up to bridge to the next scene.

    As he speaks, we hear horse beats. The hunt is up!

    Two men on horses. Hobbits hiding behind trees trying to remain unseen. The effect is s a bit spoiled by the horse being just so blasted lovely. It's a really good-looking horse.

    The Nazgul are riding in. The riders look suitably intimidating but not the horses.

    The hobbits climb out of the snow, which is in all their faces. Yeah, I guess walking near St. Petersburg in September-October is no joke.

    Fast paced action music in the background.

    They arrive at a place with a sign out front. There are women eating inside as the hobbits enter. At first I think this is an inn, but clues later in the broadcast lead me to believe this is Farmer Maggot's farm, where they rested on their way to Bree.

    The four are eating at a table. A man (Farmer Maggot?) comes to join them and sits at their table.

    He speaks, the others look pensive and suspicious.

    The guy tells a story as we hear twilight zone sounds in the background. Something spooky, I suppose.

    Shot of a man in black robes on horse back
    carrying a torch.

    Whatever the new guy is saying, he's passionate about it.

    He slaps one of them on the shoulder. Are they friends? If this is Farmer Maggot, they must be.

    Back out in the woods, the hobbits talk.

    I suspect they're brushing off whatever Passionate Guy was saying.

    Here they are on a sled. I guess
    Passionate Guy was Farmer Cotton, and they ate at his house.

    Shadow figures on horseback pursue them. Okay, THIS is suitably spooky.

    Here we are in the old forest, which looks deep and dark. Spooky sounds. The hobbits look frightened, although Frodo seems unreasonably cheerful, as if he's playing this for laughs.

    The hobbits are getting sleepy.

    An intershot of some rather creepy people in costume. I guess these are supposed to be the tree spirits putting them to sleep.

    Frodo and company wakes up to find -- Sam? -- trapped in the tree.

    One of the hobbits -- the one I think of as "Pippin" -- tries to burn the tree with a flaming branch.

    At least three hobbits are outside the tree with one inside. I think it's Sam trapped inside, which is a departure from the original, when he was the only one to resist being enchanted by the Willow.

    Musical theme starts up .

    This must be Tom Bombadil, yellow hat, bright Red vast, completely unconcerned.


    I have a bit of argument with the costume: The books tell us "bright blue his jacket is, and his boots are yellow", but he looks suitably comical and the *effect* is right.

    The hobbits tell him the problem, and with some suitable grand gestures, he rebukes old man Willow. He then pulls Sam free. Perspective makes him look more than twice as tall as the Hobbits, like a giant, though I suspect he is supposed to be man-high.

    There is Fair Lady Goldberry! And she does indeed look fair, though that bright red dress doesn't really seem the thing the river-daughter would wear. It's still very elegant.

    Hey, Tom! Watch where you're putting your hand when you're hugging Goldberry while in shot!

    Later, Frodo and Tom speaking alone.

    Frodo says "spasiba", a word I know -- "Thank you."

    Frodo hands over the ring at Tom's request.

    Tom looks at it, hands it back , says "dasvidania", which I assume means "fare well". He seems almost mocking of the Ring, a trifle to him. This is done all with gestures and facial expression, since there are so few effects. Really well done.

    A shot of Gandalf holding a candle saying something important, though I can't understand it.

    Next Day Lady Goldberry wakes them up and sends them on their way.

    The character I think of as "Sam" eats some of the food (probably given him), and feeds some to his mount. Then they ride off on ponies. Again, this is another detail in the books which was omitted in western movies.

    Now here we are in the Burrow. Frodo is all alone inside, and there is some dude wearing really awful make up.

    And at that note -- inside the Barrow -- we cut! Great cliffhanger to end on to start part 2!




    Things that are well done:

    The basic story beats are in place. The costumes are pretty good. The special effects are low budget but allow suspension of disbelief.

    Deagol-Smeagol is well done and well told. The actor isn't Andy Serkis, but he still did pretty well. And, like Andy, he's got more ham than the entire rest of the cast combined.

    They put in stuff in this version that was cut from the western version, such as the scene where Gandalf interrogates Gollum with the aid of a red hot fiery poker.

    They put in Tom Bombadil and Fair Lady Goldberry, which were well done. They also added other details such as the Hobbits riding ponies , which showed up in the books but not the movies.

    Good use of perspective to give the illusion of the big people being taller and larger than the hobbits.


    Areas of improvement:

    Storytelling in the birthday party seems a bit choppy, too many cuts and flashbacks. There's also some "dead air", too much time people celebrating with not enough action. Given how pressed for air time they must have been, I'd have cut this short.

    They use the narrator a lot to bridge scenes and fill in the gaps. I suppose this is due to the low budget not giving them the money to film the scenes, but if I were in charge of the world I'd give them more budget for more filming, in the hope of eliminating him altogether. I really don't want to see him again after the original introduction of the story.

    I think the pacing is a little off. By the end of part one we're in the barrow downs trapped in a wight's cave, which means we're really going to have to ROCKET the story telling to get us to the end of the book by the end of part 2, which is only an hour away.

    NOTE:
    You have to use your imagination to really appreciate this viewing. If you expect something like an Avatar extravaganza which shows everything and leaves nothing to the imagination, you're going to be disappointed. But if you're willing to fill in the blanks with your imagination, it's not all that bad.


    And that's my impression! I wouldn't call it must-watch viewing or in any way comparable to modern movies, but it was definitely a valiant effort and compares well with the animated Bakshi version of the same time period, of which there is a suitably snarky overview.

    ETA: Scrolling through the comments, I see some suitably interesting (or snarky) comments.

    1)
    Serdce Danko
    2 days ago
    To the foreign people in the comments - It is a theater stage play recorded in the format of tv film. Such kind of format was popular in Soviet Union.

    2)
    Nollis
    1 day ago
    10:30 Gandalf uses the power of 70's porn soundtrack to make Bilbo give up the ring



    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    Last edited by pendell; 2021-04-06 at 06:18 PM.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  11. - Top - End - #11
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    And now for part 2!

    When we last saw Frodo he as in a wight's lair on the Barrow Downs, hamming it up magnificently. What will we see this time?

    Spoiler
    Show

    We're in a tomb with a lot of crosses, which seems anachronistic ; Middle-Earth is to take place well before the events of our first century, so crosses shouldn't be used. But I suppose that's how the audience knows this is a tomb?

    Frodo calling out for Sam, Pippin, Merry.

    There they are lying down with candles on their chests.

    The wight looks like a drag queen, enough makeup for a clown.

    Pull back to the hobbits and yes, we see a long naked sword laid across them, just like the book.

    Frodo says "nyet" repeatedly. I guess he's having an internal debate as to whether to run away, abandoning his friends, or try to save them.

    He calls out for Tom Bombadil, and Tom appears.

    Tom digs them out. A rather weird warping sequence, maybe indicating the passage of time?

    Back on our ponies, riding, presumably to Bree.

    Fast disco music. We see black figures on horses, the riders. Ironically, the hobbit's
    mounts look more like black rider horses than the actual nazgul's steeds do!

    They arrive in a building, presumably the inn at Bree. Frodo looks very fatigued.

    They are shown to a table. Shouldn't get them too close up -- the makeup on their faces is obvious at this close angle.

    And there's Strider in a corner, staring att our four friends!

    The hobbits get in an argument an dnow , Forodo
    is starting to get into a dance with a lady. They have a duet, then dance together.

    She's a good singer. She would have been a good addition to the movies, even if she's not in the book.

    Now other people are dancing as well.

    Frodo accidentally puts on the ring, drawing gasps from the crowd.

    Somehow he winds up at Strider's table. Strider
    doesn't seem happy about what just transpired.

    Barliman Butterbur comes in to speak to them. For some reason they're all the same size again.

    Frodo gets a letter from Gandalf. It's big enough to be a scroll.

    They read the poem. It's in Russian, but even I can recognize "All that glitters is not gold..."

    They put their hands together. Welcome to the team, Aragorn.

    Barliman Butterbur runs in. He looks extremely worried. Aragorn takes charge.

    The fast theme I've come to associate with the Nazgul starts up. And here come three riders down a snowy lane.

    Narrator cuts in to fill us in on the action.

    Weird sound effects. Is Frodo being tempted by the Ring?

    A rider wielding a flaming torch yelling something.

    Frodo takes out his sword and stabs. The Nazgul, still on horseback, stabs him with his sword. So that was a very quick skip over
    "Knife in the Dark" and "Flight to the Ford"

    Shot of a waterfall. I guess we just went through the Nazgul being swept away?

    And here's Gandalf. I guess we're Rivendell now.


    Frodo meets his companions and Gandalf again.

    And here's Bilbo!

    The Council starts. Elrond has a brilliant white outfit. People in costume file in to sit at a long, rectangular table lit by candles.

    Frodo brings out the ring to show them.

    Bilbo has a moment, though the actor in the movie did a better job.

    Gandalf talking to a person in a gold robe.
    I think this must be a flashback to Gandalf confronting Saruman and being imprisoned by him. Though Saruman looks more like a refuge from an SF show, being cleanshaven with silver bands around his forehead.

    Seen of fighting creatures in front of Saruman as he speaks. Is he warning of what will happen if they do not ally with the Enemy?

    Gandalf is not having it.

    Saruman points his finger down , probably condemning Gandalf to imprisonment.

    Gandalf wrestling with the bars of a door. I guess he's been imprisoned.

    Now we see Gandalf riding to freedom on an Eagle. It's not a very convincing eagle, but it does make the point.

    Now a man speaks wearing a red cloak and a chain, probably Boromir demanding they use the ring as a weapon in battle.

    The companions are chosen. Yep, the guy in the red cloak is Boromir. We are also introduced to Legolas (wearing bright white, just as Elrond is) and Gimli (who doesn't really look remarkable)

    They clasp hands.

    Intercut to narrator and back. Here they are on the mountains. They're looking at a mpa.

    Ironic that Caradhras is probably the place that looks most like Russia in winter, yet there is little snow in evidence.

    Howling of wolves, everyone draws swords.

    The "wolves" are human actors wearing wolf heads.

    A lot of confused movement which I guess is supposed to be a fight scene.

    And there are the riders again! I recognize their theme. Seems odd they're back on horses. They should have fell beasts by now.

    Next cut is our characters in front of a painting of a cavern. I guess this is Moria.

    Two of the hobbits go falling into a pit.

    Shot of a woman in white holding her hands in front of her face. Is this Galadriel watching?

    Everybody's holding candles as they're trying to get through the passage. A closeup of Boromir looking ominously at the camera.

    There's a woman with them ... is that supposed to be Legolas? Well played, Russian team, well played.

    And here come the orcs running in with swords.

    Again, a confused shot of people swinging weapons although never actually in the same shot.

    Boromir gets some good action scenes, fighting with both his sword and his feet. Sam flails around like a windmill. Legolas has a birght sword.

    Gandalf surrounded by orcs.

    Merry appears to be wounded, a departure from the books.

    And here's the bridge of Khazad-dum. It is very narrow, such that only one person can cross at a time. Aragorn stumbles a bit but makes it a cross. Having a hard time keeping his balance.

    The hobbits are crying. I guess Gandalf is dead. I didn't see the Balrog. Perhaps he was that man wearing red? But I didn't see Gandalf either stand up to him or fall into the abyss.

    Narrator cuts in . Leaves, people in white dancing. This must be Lorien.

    Gimli and Boromir seem cautious.

    It doesn't match my image. I always thought of the sentries in Lorien as wearing something akin to camouflage, blending in perfectly with the woods in grey elven-cloaks, shooting those who didn't belong without warning.

    Still, the gold leaves do bear a resemblance to the Mallorns as Tolkien described them.

    The other characters partake of food and fall asleep. Gimli and Boromir, however, remain aloof.

    A shot of a house. Is that an elven house?

    They are brought into the presence of the Lady Galadriel.


    She's holding two glowing things in her hand and gesturing. Is this the mirror?

    Frodo offers the ring.

    Legolas looks like she has a headache.

    She is actually holding the ring in her hand and cries. She says "Nyet", and hands it back looking very serious. I assume this is some variant of the "Instead of a dark lord you would have a queen" speech.

    We look down at a pool to see a red eye staring at us. This must be the mirror of Galadriel, and that is Sauron being his unpleasant self.

    Frodo attempting to pick a fruit. Boromir picks it -- he's taller -- and hands it to him.

    Boromir is monologuing. I assume this is his pitch to get the ring for his own.

    Frodo almost hands it over but says no.

    As Boromir speaks we hear a snare drum beating. The ring is tempting Boromir with
    visions of martial glory.

    Frodo runs. Boromir comes to himself.

    Sam catches up to Frodo.

    They set off together arm in arm.

    CREDITS.




    Well, that wasn't bad. Gandalf being rescued
    by the eagle is hilarious, as is Legolas as a girl. As said, they hit all the essentials and even included some stuff that didn't make it in the books. But, as expected, they really fast-forwarded everything from about the Prancing Pony onward. If there is just one thing they can do to make this better, I'd say get a real fight coordinator to make the actions scenes more believable. Low budget or not, they can do better.

    I'm going to give it a charitable three stars out of five for effort. As expected, certainly not a PJ masterpiece, and focuses much more heavily on set-piece scenes heavy in dialog such as the Council of Elrond than on action or the actual traveling part of the journey. I think that is the single largest thing PJ gave us -- New Zealand!

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  12. - Top - End - #12
    Barbarian in the Playground
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    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    Pendell, I'm impressed by your ability to understand what is happening in every scene!

  13. - Top - End - #13
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
    Planetar

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Raleigh NC
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    Quote Originally Posted by Murk View Post
    Pendell, I'm impressed by your ability to understand what is happening in every scene!
    It helps that I am thoroughly familiar with the original books. If I were a first time viewer who had never read Tolkien's work, I think I would have a lot of trouble.

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    "Every lie we tell incurs a debt to the truth. Sooner or later, that debt is paid."

    -Valery Legasov in Chernobyl

  14. - Top - End - #14
    Dwarf in the Playground
     
    Kobold

    Join Date
    Aug 2019

    Default Re: Fellowship of the Ring, as told in the USSR

    Haven't watched it yet, but I hope there's some good commentary as the real hero of the show -- Sam, hero of labor -- carries Frodo's fat plutocratic tuckus across half of middle earth, listening to him whine all the way

    Respectfully,

    Brian P.
    To be fair, Tolkien would agree that Sam is at least as much of a hero as Frodo is, if not more so.

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