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    Librarian in the Playground Moderator
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    Default Re: What are technologies that a time traveler could easily introduce to ancient time

    Quote Originally Posted by veti View Post
    The hard part of that formula is the screen. That's not something that would be readily available in ancient Sumer.
    The screen was nice, but not necessary. You could do the same with two planks, or flat rocks, letting the water run out the side. Might even work better, since it would make the paper flatter.
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  2. - Top - End - #302
    Ettin in the Playground
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    Default Re: What are technologies that a time traveler could easily introduce to ancient time

    Quote Originally Posted by warty goblin View Post
    One weird downside of early paper production is that archeologists would lose huge amounts of knowledge about ancient societies. We have, for instance, huge amounts of Hittite diplomatic correspondence because it was written or copied onto clay tablets for the state archive, and the tablets survive. Our knowlege of Egypt is heavily biased towards what made it onto monuments, or was carved into limestone as a rough draft of a papyrus final version, simply because the stone survives. An ancient world that ran on paper would be much more opaque to us.
    More durable forms of data storage would probably still be used even with cheap paper. Cheaper alternatives to parchment and stone existed at the time the records you're talking about were made, after all.

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