Support the GITP forums on Patreon
Help support GITP's forums (and ongoing server maintenance) via Patreon
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 67
  1. - Top - End - #1
    Pixie in the Playground
     
    SwashbucklerGuy

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sheffield, UK
    Gender
    Male

    Question A question of economics and diamonds

    I'ma fairly long time Lurker, and have only just decided to join in. I apologise for my first post being so random, but I can't find another thread that covers these topics, so I thought I'd enquire.

    While bantering in my regular Monday Night D&D game, someone randomly came up with the idea of economics, and it's link to life restoration.

    To whit, how big is a diamond worth 5k(such as one might use for raise dead), and does local economics affect that?

    For instance, Let's say I'm in the capital of the Holy City of Awesome Lawful and Goodness, where King Fantastical has ruled for the the Land of Milk and Honey for the last twenty years, and the land is bountiful under his reign, and diamonds are easily imported from the Dwarven Mines of Khazad O Rly. A diamond would have to be fairly hefty to cost 5k.

    The converse of that is also true. Let's say I'm hiding out in the Holy City of Awesome Lawful and Goodness, after King Fantastical's jealous elder brother, Prince Far Too Sneaky For His Own Good has deposed his brother by summoning a demon army and taking over. He then proceeded to install martial law, curfews, demons patrolling the streets, etc. Since the cost of smuggling anything at all into the city is going to be exorbitant, and the dwarves aren't trading with the new boss, a 5k diamond isn't going to be that big.

    So here's a question.

    If I bought a diamond before the return of Prince Far Too Sneaky that was worth 2.5k, thinking I'd eventually buy another one to ensure the survival of the party. Then the demons came, and the diamond I have would now cost 5k.

    Can I use it to cast Raise Dead? Despite the fact that I only paid 2.5k for it?

    If I can, does that mean it's worth buying diamonds in a place where they're common, and then going to an economic sinkhole before trying to cast my Ressurection?

    This concept caused a bit of debate, and a further concept came out. If peple became aware of this, in game, would this cause the existance of a group whose entire purpose was to buy diamonds for 5k, go to places where the same diamond costs 10k and offer to cast Res on people for 9k rather than 10? If the value of the diamond is set by the economy, rather than some guy handing me 9000gp, then you could make a cool 8k per day., until you ran out of diamonds.

    Then, when the rush of people wanting res spells started(since unless it costs a grand to get to you and back, it's worth it), and the local economy of the area that the group was based in improved, they could take the now less valuable diamonds, and relocate...

    Rinse and repeat.

    Also, could the value of diamonds depend on the value of diamonds? For instance, I have no diamonds, and I need to raise a dead comrade. It's clear that 4999gp worth of diamonds isn't worth nearly as much to me as a flat 5k, since one of those values can be used to raise a party member and the other can not. So how much more valuable is 5k of diamonds than 4.9k? Is it worth 0.1k more, or does the fact that I can use it for more stuff raise the value further? Is the life of one's tragically slain companion worth more than 100gp?

    We couldn't come up with concrete answers(though for the last part, it may have had something to do with not wanting to put a gp value on co-adventurers' lives ), so I thought I'd see what other people thought...

  2. - Top - End - #2
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Xuincherguixe's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Non Sequitoria
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    I think, diamonds are assumed to cost the same everywhere. Even when it doesn't make sense.

    You have a choice in the matter, as to if it's the size, or the cost of the diamond that matters.
    Spoiler
    Show

    Rizban: You could be all, "Today's Destruction is brought to you by the color green.... I HATE GREEN!" then fly off mumbling to yourself "Seven... seven bats... mwa ha ha ha..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Flickerdart View Post
    Everyone knows you can just parse XML with regex.
    Don't mind me. I'm just going to have some post traumatic flashbacks in the corner here and sob uncontrollably.


    Millenium Earl by Shmee

  3. - Top - End - #3
    Ogre in the Playground
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    the problem you have going on there is that your mixing the principle of sliding price scales against a system that objectively values things at a consistent price.

    D&D has always function on the premise that prices are set and pegged and things like inflation, recessions, and such simply do not happen.

    The reasoning, of course, is simple: it's a game balance decision. why? because the game designers at it's core wanted to put a bit of a constraint on the resurrection spells. Now, in a game that tries the standardize everything, the one thing that they must establish is an objective resource that they can use as a measuring unit.

    If, on the other hand, you've decided to let the D&D function like a real economy, the cost of spells would change from "must use a diamond of 5000 gp worth" (a price set within a world where prices don't shift) to something where a diamond is measured in some other fashion.

    Now, that would probably feel a bit more realistic, and you can certainly see a rise in magical entrepeneurs who focus on buying components at bulk prices and hten using them to fuel their spells services. But then you'd have a lot of work on your hands as your standard of measurement (which prior was fixed) has been thrown out the window.

  4. - Top - End - #4
    Pixie in the Playground
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Just over the Dutch border in Belgium
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    I'd say that the most 'reasonable' interpretation of this would be that you need a diamond (or collection of diamonds) which isn't defined in the spell description, but rather in the game world - the 'standard' price for the X amount of diamonds needed to cast a raise dead happens to be 5K. Therefore, as a DM, I could indeed consider allowing players to go off and look for somewhere where that quantity of diamonds is cheaper, or conversely I could choose to make that amount of diamonds cost more, if that would be 'reasonable' in the game world (large amounts of resurrections? Something that hit the diamond supply of the world? Severe trade disruptions where they can't mine them themselves?).

    Either one can be an opportunity for the players to do something and gain an advantage out of it - if they put the IC effort into it. But unless it comes up, it might be perfectly reasonable to just overlook the entire question ingame.

  5. - Top - End - #5
    Ogre in the Playground
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    think of it in terms of purchasing power.

    in D&D, currency does not undergo inflation or deflation. their value is consistent, as is the prices of all goods. The moment you start to assume any good can undergo price shifts, you introduce a whole different can of worms by implication.

    5000 gp in standard D&D will always be able to get you one diamond, or 3 suits of full plate mail (I think it's 1500 gp) with 500 gp left over, or 50000 days of service from an untrained laborer (making 1 sp per day).

    this functions entirely independant of concepts like supply and demand because the moment you introduce these concepts into a game, the game WILL fall apart or become far too complex to play easily. Suddenly, you have to consider how money is going to effect the local economy, or if by bring all this cash on you, you've automatically caused some kind of inflation, or a society, because of your actions, has an actual increase in purchasing power, etc.

  6. - Top - End - #6
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
    Emperor Tippy's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Earth

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    The amount or size of the diamonds doesn't matter. All that matters is that you payed 5K for them, and that if you found them then you would value them at 5K.

    A better idea would have been to do it by weight (1 gram of diamond dust for example) and then just had a note that the general cost for that amount is 5K.

  7. - Top - End - #7
    Ogre in the Playground
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by Emperor Tippy View Post
    The amount or size of the diamonds doesn't matter. All that matters is that you payed 5K for them, and that if you found them then you would value them at 5K.

    A better idea would have been to do it by weight (1 gram of diamond dust for example) and then just had a note that the general cost for that amount is 5K.
    but then we get into the question of the cut, clarity, carat weight, and color!

    I kid I kid.

  8. - Top - End - #8
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
    Emperor Tippy's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Earth

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by elliott20 View Post
    but then we get into the question of the cut, clarity, carat weight, and color!

    I kid I kid.
    *shrug*

    I honestly just give all my wizards a pouch, put in gold and you can draw out an expensive material component. Cost's 500 GP to buy and from then on I never have to worry about it again, makes book keeping so much easier.

  9. - Top - End - #9
    Orc in the Playground
     
    RedKnightGirl

    Join Date
    Dec 2006

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Moreover, diamonds are considered trade goods and not items in the system. They do not lose value on resale so they are just another form of currency. It's kind of like asking if you could buy 100 gold pieces for 500 silver. Is the gold worth 100 good or 500 silver?

  10. - Top - End - #10
    Banned
     
    nagora's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Norn Iron
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    It's about sacrifice. You have to sacrifice 5,000gp AND you use that sacrifice to purchase diamond(s) for the ritual.

    If you pay 4,000gp for the diamond then your sacrifice is 4,000gp no matter what the local price is where you are when the spell is cast.

  11. - Top - End - #11
    Orc in the Playground
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Denmark
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    The only way to go is to go with weight or some other measurement, otherwise these examples will crop up:

    1)
    Player A is given a diamond by the king. As a gift, it cost nothing and can therefore not be used. (value equals what you paid for the item)

    2)
    Player A finds a person in the marketplace willing to buy the diamond and suddenly it can be used (value equals price on open market)

    3)
    Player A, having learned from last time, buys a diamond for 1 GP and has player B SWEAR that he would buy it for 5K. Suddenly it is usable. (value as rules lawyering sthick to beat the DM with...)

    4)
    ???

    5)
    Nomatter what you end up with, this will end up with profit for the players somewhere along the line :)


    EDIT:
    "Ninjas - This picture contains 4 of them"
    Last edited by Blanks; 2008-06-03 at 11:21 AM.

  12. - Top - End - #12
    Orc in the Playground
     
    RedKnightGirl

    Join Date
    Dec 2006

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by Blanks View Post
    The only way to go is to go with weight or some other measurement, otherwise these examples will crop up:

    1)
    Player A is given a diamond by the king. As a gift, it cost nothing and can therefore not be used. (value equals what you paid for the item)

    2)
    Player A finds a person in the marketplace willing to buy the diamond and suddenly it can be used (value equals price on open market)

    3)
    Player A, having learned from last time, buys a diamond for 1 GP and has player B SWEAR that he would buy it for 5K. Suddenly it is usable. (value as rules lawyering sthick to beat the DM with...)

    4)
    ???

    5)
    Nomatter what you end up with, this will end up with profit for the players somewhere along the line :)
    Again, diamonds have intrinsic value in the D&D universe. If the king gave you diamonds for free that are worth 5000 gold then they can be used as a spell component worth 5000 gold.

  13. - Top - End - #13
    Banned
     
    nagora's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Norn Iron
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Tira View Post
    Again, diamonds have intrinsic value in the D&D universe.
    The only things with intrinsic worth are food and water. Diamonds, or anything you can't live off, having the same set worth everywhere is a convienient notion but not something that should be applied to every setting all the time. There is nothing wrong with a DM saying that diamonds in one place cost half what the cost somewhere else, or that all diamonds everywhere are so common that they are worthless.

  14. - Top - End - #14
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    Citizen Joe's Avatar

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    It isn't how much you pay for it, it is how much it is 'worth'. If you went by the OP logic, you couldn't use stolen diamonds.

    Think of it a bit as karats, so you need a certain number of karat weight of diamonds to use for your spell. Now there is an assumption here that spell components can be purchased from an alchemical supplier. So they are going to have 'spell grade' diamonds that are weighted out for various spells and will likely cost the stated amount. I'm sure they are getting their raw materials from elsewhere, like the chippings from a jeweler.

    Example: Lets say you need 50 karats weight of diamonds to do your spell. The gold standard for diamonds is 50 karats for 100 lbs of gold. Mr. DeBears has a diamond mine and mineral rights so he's getting raw diamonds for labor costs and taxes. By carefully cutting these raw diamonds, he turns them from gemstones into jewelry. So at the cost of maybe 20% of the weight, he can create jewelry that can sell for 10 times the material costs. The 'waste' material might be ground into a fine powder or used for other decorations, but mostly the market is for magic. So that 5000 gp by weight raw diamond becomes 1000 gp by weight diamond chips/dust and an 40,000 gp value ring. When he gets enough 'waste' together, he sells it as a at market value.

    Looking at the gold piece. 50 gps weigh 1 lbs. and 1 lb of gold is worth 50 gps. That may seem like simple math, but that isn't how currency is supposed to work. The coin is supposed to have more buying power than it's constituent inherent value. When an economy works based solely on the inherent value of the coin, that means there is no faith in the existing government. The coin is essentially bullion. So its value is exactly the value of the weight of gold (or silver) in the coin. Making this bullion into coins is merely an easy way to count the weight without a scale. You could just as easily have bars or ingots with the weight stamped on the surface. In any case, bullion was not intended for circulation.

  15. - Top - End - #15
    Orc in the Playground
     
    RedKnightGirl

    Join Date
    Dec 2006

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by nagora View Post
    The only things with intrinsic worth are food and water. Diamonds, or anything you can't live off, having the same set worth everywhere is a convienient notion but not something that should be applied to every setting all the time. There is nothing wrong with a DM saying that diamonds in one place cost half what the cost somewhere else, or that all diamonds everywhere are so common that they are worthless.
    Technically, food and water don't necessarily have any intrinsic value in D&D. There's nothing wrong with a DM manipulating diamond value from place to place but it goes against RAW and it certainly seems to make things more complicated.

  16. - Top - End - #16
    Orc in the Playground
     
    batsofchaos's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    From a purely adjudicative perspective, the ruling I would make as a DM is that the diamonds need to have a base value of 5000 gp, which is determined based on weight. Any price shifts dependent on availability and expenses incurred do not count towards the diamond's base value. This isn't perfect from a realistic economy perspective, but it does okay for a DnD game.
    The following statement is true.

    The previous statement is false.


    If you are a Sprint customer, please let me know if I can ever help you with your service. If you are not yet a Sprint customer, I would like to help you become one. Send me a PM!

  17. - Top - End - #17
    Orc in the Playground
     
    RedKnightGirl

    Join Date
    Dec 2006

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by batsofchaos View Post
    From a purely adjudicative perspective, the ruling I would make as a DM is that the diamonds need to have a base value of 5000 gp, which is determined based on weight. Any price shifts dependent on availability and expenses incurred do not count towards the diamond's base value. This isn't perfect from a realistic economy perspective, but it does okay for a DnD game.
    Actually, that's pretty much how the rules say it works.

  18. - Top - End - #18
    Orc in the Playground
     
    batsofchaos's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    I didn't think there was a defined rule, other than "price of items has the inherent idea of a static economy," and my take is just a logical step of static value placed in a dynamic economy.

    Honestly, none of it makes sense. It exists solely as a ding to inflict on the characters. "Yeah you can resurrect John, but you need to shell out 5000 smackers to do it." Economics doesn't, and shouldn't really enter the situation.

    It's not an uninteresting concept, though. If the players need to res someone and the place their in simply doesn't have diamonds for an affordable amount (like, they have 100 gp-valued diamonds marked up to 10000 gp), it presents and interesting adventure opportunity as a way to get ahold of the material components. It would be tedious for everyone if every time the players needed to cast fireball they needed to raid a cave for some bat guano, but used judiciously it can heighten the gaming experience.

    In a similar vein, playing with economies a party could make a decent hunk of money. If said town had a huge mark-up on diamonds the players could conceivably set up a smuggling operation to flood the black market with diamonds, reaping in huge profits in the process. There are plenty of adventure opportunities hidden in the idea.
    The following statement is true.

    The previous statement is false.


    If you are a Sprint customer, please let me know if I can ever help you with your service. If you are not yet a Sprint customer, I would like to help you become one. Send me a PM!

  19. - Top - End - #19
    Bugbear in the Playground
     
    FlyMolo's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2007

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by Emperor Tippy View Post
    *shrug*

    I honestly just give all my wizards a pouch, put in gold and you can draw out an expensive material component. Cost's 500 GP to buy and from then on I never have to worry about it again, makes book keeping so much easier.
    Ditto, but mine's magic, and also makes 10 foot poles and rowboats and such.
    Proud initiate ref for the Arena!
    Spoiler
    Show

    Llince 2-1
    Akhond 1-0
    Wolatifex 0-0


    Crimson Mageatar!
    Spoiler
    Show
    Ex-avatar/ists:
    The Chilli God
    Serpentine

  20. - Top - End - #20
    Orc in the Playground
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Denmark
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Tira View Post
    Again, diamonds have intrinsic value in the D&D universe. If the king gave you diamonds for free that are worth 5000 gold then they can be used as a spell component worth 5000 gold.
    That would be my take on it, but it also lessens the possibilities that the OP was exploring. I merely listed a series of good arguments why it has to be measured by weight (and as weight=price in DnD, it gives us base value)

  21. - Top - End - #21
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    GnomeWizardGuy

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    London
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Diamonds and Black Onyx are the two most clearly, unarguably magical materials, wizards and clerics are all after them. We now have a market including an elite group who all have the ability to shift planes, bind outsiders/elementals, contact any reputable dealer through sending and negotiate in any language you care to deal in.

    Demand can indeed alter prices but you've got to take into account that other magic users know that and are prepared to supply anywhere in all the multiverse on two minutes notice with all the gems you could want. Supply seems to be universal.
    Give them bread and circusses and the plebs wont rise against you. Give adventurers dungeons and trapped chests and they won't waste time looking to ransack your home and kill your wife.

  22. - Top - End - #22
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    puppyavenger's Avatar

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    GMT-5
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Tira View Post
    Again, diamonds have intrinsic value in the D&D universe. If the king gave you diamonds for free that are worth 5000 gold then they can be used as a spell component worth 5000 gold.
    So, in the D&D universe, diomonds have an intristic value but sapient life doesn't?
    seriosly, lookat the 10-minute duration example for PAO, now look at the caveat that says you can create anything intristiclyvlauable.
    also, ture creation, you no longer need to buy them.
    Spoiler
    Show

    played the Space Pope in Total War 2125
    ..and the Papal States of Luna in Total War 2260


    Playing
    The Gears Chosen in Total Way: Broken City

    The Spindleshanks Crusade in Total War: 40K

    Dragon Avatar by Serp

    Darkness Fell, and with it Light

  23. - Top - End - #23
    Barbarian in the Playground
     
    Hal's Avatar

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Baltimore
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    The only time I might mess with supply/demand issues would be as a plot device, or perhaps a GM tool.

    For example, you know the next phase of the adventure is going to be filled with death, of both the frequent and obscene varieties. You can thus make your setting in a town with an attached diamond mine, where the value of diamonds is so high, a Res costs something like 1000gp or less. Heck, you could make it free if you can get the players to pony something up to their supplier or NPC cleric.

    Alternative example: You don't want your players to spend weeks hauling out the dragon's hoard so they can buy whatever they want in the town nearby. Solution: The town is flush with gold, to the point that copper pieces have replaced them in value (Insert reasonable explanation here). It should convince them to move on.
    Halbert's Cubicle - Wherein I write about gaming and . . . you know . . . stuff.

  24. - Top - End - #24
    Titan in the Playground
     
    tyckspoon's Avatar

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Indianapolis
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by puppyavenger View Post
    So, in the D&D universe, diomonds have an intristic value but sapient life doesn't?
    seriosly, lookat the 10-minute duration example for PAO, now look at the caveat that says you can create anything intristiclyvlauable.
    also, ture creation, you no longer need to buy them.
    Sure. Diamonds are magical. Sapients aren't. Do humans value the lives of orcs, or vice versa? Typically no, but they're both intelligent races (and far more similar to each other than something like, say, mind flayers, which don't value any other form of sapience except as food..) Each group will value diamonds at roughly the same amount, however, thanks to their function as magical material. Once again, magic is worth more than almost any amount of non-magic. Very D&D.

  25. - Top - End - #25
    Titan in the Playground
     
    BlueWizardGirl

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Nope, can't go by weight either. On a low-gravity world, you'd have to spend more to bring someone back to life.

    Seriously - of all the sciences that D&D massacres, surely economics is the most mutilated. To pick at this one thread of unreason in a tapestry of gobbledegook is, itself, silly.
    Despair favours the status quo. It is a luxury we cannot afford. ~ Andrew Nikiforuk

    Quote Originally Posted by jakarta View Post
    I'm an English teacher. You are misapplying the concept of "singular they".
    If you want the full lecture we can do it in private.

  26. - Top - End - #26
    Orc in the Playground
     
    batsofchaos's Avatar

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Fine, the mass not the weight.
    The following statement is true.

    The previous statement is false.


    If you are a Sprint customer, please let me know if I can ever help you with your service. If you are not yet a Sprint customer, I would like to help you become one. Send me a PM!

  27. - Top - End - #27
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    GnomeWizardGuy

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    London
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by Toliudar View Post
    surely economics is the most mutilated
    I'd go with physics myself, and economists only rate their discipline as a science to create lucrative confidence in their half-assed half-informed guestamations anyway
    Give them bread and circusses and the plebs wont rise against you. Give adventurers dungeons and trapped chests and they won't waste time looking to ransack your home and kill your wife.

  28. - Top - End - #28
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    puppyavenger's Avatar

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    GMT-5
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by tyckspoon View Post
    Sure. Diamonds are magical. Sapients aren't. Do humans value the lives of orcs, or vice versa? Typically no, but they're both intelligent races (and far more similar to each other than something like, say, mind flayers, which don't value any other form of sapience except as food..) Each group will value diamonds at roughly the same amount, however, thanks to their function as magical material. Once again, magic is worth more than almost any amount of non-magic. Very D&D.
    an epic cleric with ignore materials values them less than a non-epic cleric...
    A member of a hunter-gatherer soicity in an area without diomonds doesn't value them, even if they are a powerfull spell-caster.
    Any god of death sure as hell doesn't value them...
    The rules don't state they're magical...
    you can create them with true creation.
    Spoiler
    Show

    played the Space Pope in Total War 2125
    ..and the Papal States of Luna in Total War 2260


    Playing
    The Gears Chosen in Total Way: Broken City

    The Spindleshanks Crusade in Total War: 40K

    Dragon Avatar by Serp

    Darkness Fell, and with it Light

  29. - Top - End - #29
    Ogre in the Playground
     
    Trog's Avatar

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Gender
    Male

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by Citizen Joe View Post
    Looking at the gold piece. 50 gps weigh 1 lbs. and 1 lb of gold is worth 50 gps. That may seem like simple math, but that isn't how currency is supposed to work. The coin is supposed to have more buying power than it's constituent inherent value. When an economy works based solely on the inherent value of the coin, that means there is no faith in the existing government. The coin is essentially bullion. So its value is exactly the value of the weight of gold (or silver) in the coin. Making this bullion into coins is merely an easy way to count the weight without a scale. You could just as easily have bars or ingots with the weight stamped on the surface. In any case, bullion was not intended for circulation.
    (Emphasis mine)
    Have you SEEN how many failed and toppled/evil empires there are?!? No faith in government is right.

    Bullion is not intended for circulation... nowadays. But back when, that's how they valued the coin. It was why people used to shave the edges of coins off... to get enough to melt down and sell without devaluing their coins. It's the reason that coins have raised, defined edges - to prevent this practice. Obviously it leads to other problems too which is why it is no longer done. But being as DnD is sort of Ye Olde Time-y they stick with the, as you put it, "bullion" system. Paper money just doesn't have the same feel to it somehow.

    The OP brings up a very good question. Basing any magical effect on the market value of a component is a bit silly if you look at it in real world economic terms. A more constant measurement would be needed. Volume, weight, etc. But am I going to use a system like that? No. I prefer my monies (gem or otherwise) to be constant. Like a gem with 1,000 GP stamped right on it.


  30. - Top - End - #30
    Firbolg in the Playground
     
    Emperor Tippy's Avatar

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Earth

    Default Re: A question of economics and diamonds

    Quote Originally Posted by Trog View Post
    Like a gem with 1,000 GP stamped right on it.
    That could actually be part of a quite fun, tongue in cheek, world. When the gods created the world all natural gods were given a GP value, which is stamped on them. Gold, silver, and copper come out of the ground pre formed as coins. etc.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •